HISTORICAL MANUALS

 
 
                                            UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
                                            COMPUTING CENTER
 
          Software Documentation            Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
                                            Version 3.7
 
                                            This  publication   provides  infor-
                                            mation on  the various  methods UKCC
                                            users have for  accessing the photo-
                                            typesetting equipment  at University
                                            Printing Services.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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          First Edition, Revision 0 (March 1982)
 
          This edition applies to the program UNIPOST
          and  the program  TTSTRAN.    UNIPOST is  a
          modification  of  the   VIP  post-processor
          written  at  the  University  of  Waterloo.
          Portions of this document  are adapted from
          University of Waterloo documentation.
 
          Technical changes  made to  the contents of
          this  manual  are indicated  by a  vertical
          bar to the left of the change.
 
          University of Kentucky
          Computing Center
          72 McVey Hall 00451
          Lexington, KY   40506
          Phone: 606/258-2914
 
          Processed March 22, 1982 with UW SCRIPT - Version 3.7 (11/23/81)
 
          Prepared by UK Computing Center and UK Printing Services
 
 
 
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
                                                                        CONTENTS
 
 
 
 
          Section 1.  INTRODUCTION  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  1
 
             1.A Phototypesetting Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  1
 
             1.B Phototypesetting Basics  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
 
                Ascenders and Descenders  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
 
                Picas and Points  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
 
                Leading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
 
                Character Spacing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
 
                Faces and Fonts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
 
                Which Typesetting System is Best for You? . . . . . . . . . .  5
 
          Section 2.  TYPESETTING WITH SCRIPT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
 
             2.A The SCRIPT Phototypesetting System . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
 
                Typesetting Limitations of SCRIPT . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7
 
                Fonts in PHOTO Mode (SYSCHARS)  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7
 
                Specifying Typefaces and Fonts  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
 
                Single and Double Quotation Marks . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9
 
                Occasional Oversetting of Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
 
                Defining the Page Environment for Typesetting . . . . . . . . 10
 
                Redefining the Fonts  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
 
                SCRIPT Set Symbols for Special Characters . . . . . . . . . . 12
 
             2.B Invoking SCRIPT and UNIPOST  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
 
                The PHOTO Option  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
 
                The CPI= Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
 
                The PSIZE= Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
 
                UNIPOST Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
 
 
                                                                 Contents     ii
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
                The TRNSL=1 Option  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
 
                Taking a Tape to Printing Services  . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
 
          Section 3.  TYPESETTING WITH TTSTRAN  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
 
                Creating SCRIPT Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
 
                Quotation Marks in TTSTRAN  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
 
                Writing the File onto a Tape  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
 
                Taking a Tape to Printing Services  . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
 
                Input Text Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
 
                Output Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
 
                TTSTRAN JCL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
 
                Basic Typesetting Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
 
                Setting Tabs in TTSTRAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
 
          Appendix A.  Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
 
          Appendix B.  Photo Escape Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
 
          Appendix C.  UNIPOST Datasets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
 
          Appendix D.  Sample Data  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
 
                Sample SCRIPT Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
 
                Sample SCRIPT Post-processor Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
 
                Sample TTSTRAN Input  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
 
                Sample TTSTRAN Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                                Contents     iii
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
          Section 1:  INTRODUCTION
 
 
 
          1.A Phototypesetting Systems
 
             University of Kentucky Computing Center users sometimes need output
          of a higher quality than that  produced by computer terminals and line
          printers.   Expanded character  sets and variable size  characters are
          also needed  sometimes.   These  needs can now  be met,   because text
          stored in files on  the IBM 370 computer can be  printed on phototype-
          setting  equipment  at  University Printing  Services.    This  manual
          describes the two methods available at the UKCC for converting IBM 370
          files into phototypeset copy.
 
             Phototypesetting offers many advantages.    Typeset text is legible
          and easy to  read.   It is attractive and  professional in appearance,
          adding polish  and credibility to  documents.   The ability  to change
          type styles  and sizes allows flexibility  and variety,  and  makes it
          possible to emphasize important information.  In addition, typesetting
          can save money  by reducing the number  of pages in a  document;  this
          means  fewer  pages to  reproduce,   collate,   staple or  bind,   and
          distribute.
 
             However, the typesetting process can sometimes be costly,  in terms
          of both  time and money,  because  it involves many steps.    You must
          first type the  text and take a  copy to Printing Services,   where it
          must be typed again ("keyboarded")  on  their equipment.   The text is
          then set into  type and a galley  (a long page of  type)  is produced,
          which you must proofread.   After marking corrections and changes, you
          return the galley  to Printing,  where the  portions requiring correc-
          tions are re-keyboarded and reset.    Another galley is produced,  and
          more proofreading is required.   The process takes time,  incurs labor
          costs,  and may have to be repeated  until the text is typeset exactly
          as you want it.
 
             Two phototypesetting  systems devised by  the Computing  Center and
          Printing Services are designed to reduce the cost of producing typeset
          text.  Both systems allow you to type and edit your text at a computer
          terminal,  proofread it,  make corrections,  and  then take a copy (on
          tape)   to Printing  Services.    Because you  have  already done  the
          keyboarding and proofreading,  all Printing  Services will have to do,
          ideally,  is  produce the  typeset text;   additional keyboarding  and
          proofreading should not be necessary.
 
             The cost of phototypesetting is  significantly reduced if you enter
          the text yourself at a computer terminal.  The cost is further reduced
          if you also enter the  typesetting commands ("codes")  yourself.   You
          can do  both by using  the SCRIPT PHOTO  system or the  TTSTRAN system
          available at  the UKCC.    It should  be noted  that the  SCRIPT PHOTO
          system is  a pagination system and  the TTSTRAN system is  not.   This
          means that  SCRIPT allows various components  of a page  (e.g.,  text,
 
 
                                                  Section 1:  INTRODUCTION     1
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
          page numbers,  and running headings and  footings)  to be assembled so
          that  the page  is complete  and appears  exactly  as it  will in  the
          document.
 
             To use the SCRIPT PHOTO system, you work at a computer terminal and
          enter your text along with SCRIPT commands ("control words").   SCRIPT
          is a  document-composition program  that formats  text;  it  justifies
          margins, centers headings,  indents blocks of copy,  and so on.   When
          finished,  you  use the  SCRIPT PHOTO  option to  produce output  that
          includes both text and command information ("escape codes").
 
             You then use a post-processing program  to further process the text
          and  escape codes.    The  SCRIPT  post-processor is  called  UNIPOST.
          Basically,  UNIPOST  converts the  escape codes  into the  typesetting
          codes required by the Compugraphic  Unisetter,  the phototypesetter at
          Printing Services.   UNIPOST then translates  the text and typesetting
          codes from EBCDIC code (which the IBM 370 computer recognizes)  to TTS
          code (which the Unisetter recognizes) and writes them onto a tape.  At
          Printing the text  is copied from the  tape onto a floppy  disk.   The
          Unisetter then  reads the  disk and  typesets the  text.   If  you are
          already familiar with SCRIPT, this system is probably the best one for
          you.
 
             To use  the TTSTRAN system,   you work  at a computer  terminal and
          enter  your  text  along  with  the  typesetting  codes  used  by  the
          Unisetter.   This system is called  TTSTRAN because it TRANSlates your
          text from EBCDIC code (used by the IBM 370 computer) to TTS code (used
          by the  Unisetter),  and  then writes  it onto  a tape.    At Printing
          Services the text  is copied from the  tape onto a floppy  disk.   The
          disk is  then read by  the Unisetter,   and typeset text  is produced.
          (NOTE:  You don't necessarily have to enter typesetting codes yourself
          with TTSTRAN; you can enter only text and have an operator at Printing
          Services add  the codes later.   You  save more money by  entering the
          codes yourself, however.)
 
             Whichever  system you  decide to  use,   it is  important that  you
          schedule  your typesetting  work  in  advance.   Please  let  Printing
          Services know several days  ahead of time when you will  be bringing a
          tape to them and when you will need the typeset text.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                  Section 1:  INTRODUCTION     2
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
          1.B Phototypesetting Basics
 
             Phototypesetting is a method of  setting type by using photographic
          materials and principles.  The equipment consists of a light source, a
          master image of characters, and photo-sensitive film or paper.   After
          a character is selected,  the light  shines through that character and
          is focused  onto the film  or paper by  several lenses.   Size  of the
          characters can be changed by moving the lenses.
 
             Like computer users,  typesetters have  their own jargon and termi-
          nology.   Since you  will be acting as your own  typesetter,  you will
          want to be familiar with the printing terms defined below.
 
 
          Ascenders and Descenders
 
             Uppercase characters  rest on an  imaginary horizontal  line called
          the baseline.    Lowercase characters  such as  "x" also  rest on  the
          baseline,  and do not  extend below the baseline or above  the body of
          the character.   The height of such lowercase characters is called the
          x-height.   Some lowercase characters extend  below the baseline;  the
          part of the  letter below the baseline is  the descender.   Characters
          with descenders are g, j, p, q, and y.   The part of a character which
          extends above the x-height is the ascender.  Characters with ascenders
          are b, d, f, h, k, l, and t.
 
 
          Picas and Points
 
             The basic  unit of  measurement used  in typesetting  is the  pica.
          There are six picas per inch,  so one pica is equal to 1/6 of an inch.
          Picas are  used to measure  line length  (the distance,  from  left to
          right, between two margins).
 
             A pica can be divided into twelve points.   There are 72 points per
          inch,  so one point  equals 1/72 of an inch.   The  vertical height of
          characters on a typesetter is measured in points and is referred to as
          the  point  size.   The  point  size  must  include enough  space  for
          characters with  ascenders and descenders,   and for some  extra space
          above and below.   For example,  in 10-point type each character is no
          more than 10/72 of an inch high, and some are several points less than
          that.   In fact,  the actual size of any particular character will not
          be as large as the point size.
 
             The following point sizes are available on the Unisetter:  6, 7, 8,
          9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 18, 24, 30, and 36.
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                  Section 1:  INTRODUCTION     3
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
          Leading
 
             The vertical distance (spacing) between lines of type is called the
          leading (pronounced LED-ing).    Leading is measured in  points and is
          usually two or  three points larger than  the point size of  the type.
          This is so the  descenders on one line do not appear  too close to the
          ascenders on the  next line.   Some common combinations  of point size
          and leading are 8-point type on 10-point leading,  9 on 11,  and 10 on
          12.   (Computer output produced on a line  printer at 6 lines per inch
          is approximately  equivalent to  10-point type  on 12-point  leading.)
          When the leading is  equal to the point size,  the type  is said to be
          set solid.
 
 
          Character Spacing
 
             A blank space equal  in width to the point size of  the type in use
          is an em space.   A blank space equal  in width to the numerals in the
          typeface in use is an en space.  A blank space equal to the width of a
          period or a comma in the typeface in use is a thin space.
 
             The  spaceband  is an  expandable  space  placed between  words  to
          justify a  line.   The  spaceband has  a minimum  width and  a maximum
          width.  The minimum width is always 4 relative units.
 
             The width of a character is  measured in relative units,  which are
          fractional units of space in proportion to the type size (usually 1/18
          of an em space).    Characters can range in width from  0 units (e.g.,
          accents) to 18 units.  To arrange characters on a line in an aestheti-
          cally pleasing way,   the white space between words  must be balanced.
          The typesetter uses both fixed (em, en, thin) and variable (spaceband)
          spaces to do this.
 
 
          Faces and Fonts
 
             Typeset characters come in a variety of designs, styles,  and point
          sizes.   A specific type design is  known as a typeface;  for example,
          there is a typeface named Souvenir.   A typeface can usually be set in
          several different type styles, such as light, bold,  and italic.   For
          example, the Souvenir typeface may be set in Souvenir Light,  Souvenir
          Medium, Souvenir Medium Italic, Souvenir Bold, etc.  Two broad classi-
          fications of type style are those with  serifs (a light line or stroke
          projecting from the  ends of the main  stroke of a letter)   and those
          without serifs ("sans-serif" type).  The complete set of characters in
          a given type style and point size is called a font.
 
             Mixing  different typefaces  in a  document is  not generally  done
          because the  diversity can be distracting  to readers.   It's  best to
          choose a typeface and use it for  all type styles.   The decisions you
          make will depend  on what is most  appropriate for the layout  of your
          document.   The layout  will depend on the nature of  the document and
 
 
                                                  Section 1:  INTRODUCTION     4
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
          the way it will be used by its  readers.   If you are at all unsure of
          the  most appropriate  choices,  a  typesetting  operator at  Printing
          Services can advise you.
 
 
          Which Typesetting System is Best for You?
 
             Now you are ready to use either  SCRIPT PHOTO or TTSTRAN to prepare
          your text.   It's  a good idea to  look over the description  for each
          system before deciding which one to use.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                  Section 1:  INTRODUCTION     5
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
          Section 2:  TYPESETTING WITH SCRIPT
 
 
 
          2.A The SCRIPT Phototypesetting System
 
             The  SCRIPT phototypesetting  system  allows you  to  go from  line
          printer or  terminal to  phototypesetter without  changing your  input
          document  to any  significant  extent.   Text  lines  and most  SCRIPT
          commands that affect spacing, text positioning, and columns remain the
          same.   However,  the SCRIPT PHOTO system currently will not allow use
          of the tab  feature;  we are working to make  this function available.
          (See "Typesetting Limitations of SCRIPT" below  for a few other excep-
          tions.)  Macros should continue to work, though you may wish to change
          various parameters, depending on the output device (printer, terminal,
          or phototypesetter) you will be using at any given time.
 
             Typesetting with SCRIPT  requires you to use the  SCRIPT PHOTO mode
          and the UNIPOST post-processing program.  PHOTO mode is a special mode
          of  operation in  SCRIPT  which provides  support  for output  devices
          referred  to as  typesetters.   In  PHOTO mode,   SCRIPT encodes  text
          formatting  information  at  the  beginning  of  each  output  record.
          UNIPOST is  a post-processing program  that converts  this information
          into the typesetting codes used by the Unisetter at Printing Services.
 
             To use this system, you should have fairly good knowledge of SCRIPT
          and access to  the SCRIPT formatting program on the  IBM 370 computer.
          You will  also need  at least two  7" reels  of magnetic  tape (called
          mini-reels).   It's best to have two tapes  so that one can serve as a
          back-up.   These tapes  may be purchased at the  Computing Center Main
          Office (72 McVey Hall)  for $10 each;  office hours are from 8:00 a.m.
          to 4:30 p.m.,   Monday through Friday.   The tapes  must be unlabeled,
          1600 BPI, temporary tapes.
 
             In simplest  terms,  this is what  happens when you use  the SCRIPT
          PHOTO typesetting system:
 
              1.  You enter  your text  and control  words into  a SCRIPT  file,
                  including information  about typefaces and  fonts to  be used.
                  You proofread your text, correct errors, and determine that it
                  is ready to be typeset.
 
              2.  If you  are at a display  terminal,  you may SCRIPT  your file
                  using the PHOTO option:
 
                      script  filename(photo
 
                  This  produces an  intermediate file  containing Photo  Escape
                  Codes (see Appendix B)  and text.   This file can be viewed on
                  your terminal screen if you are at a display terminal.  It has
                  the same  filename as  your SCRIPT  file,  and  a filetype  of
                  PHOTO.  To view the file, simply enter the command:
 
 
                                       Section 2:  TYPESETTING WITH SCRIPT     6
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
                      xedit  filename  photo
 
                  The file  will show you exactly  where lines and  columns will
                  end when the text is typeset.    NOTE:  this file is used only
                  for proofreading purposes at a  display terminal.   You cannot
                  print a copy of this file.
 
              3.  If the PHOTO file appears to be all right,  you submit a batch
                  job to  OS to  execute the  post-processing procedure.    This
                  procedure  converts   SCRIPT  control  words   to  typesetting
                  commands  recognized by  the Unisetter  at Printing  Services,
                  converts the commands  and text from EBCDIC to  TTS code,  and
                  then writes them onto a magnetic tape.
 
              4.  You take  the tape  to Printing Services,   where the  text is
                  copied  onto a  floppy disk.    The  disk is  loaded onto  the
                  Unisetter, which produces your typeset text.
 
 
          Typesetting Limitations of SCRIPT
 
             Currently,  the SCRIPT  PHOTO system will not allow use  of the .tb
          (tab) control word, but we are working to make this feature available.
          Also, the control words .ad (adjust), .bx (box), .oo (output overlay),
          and .rc  (revision codes)   are not  currently handled  properly,  and
          SCRIPT will not give you any warning  messages if you try to use them.
          However,  .oo  can be achieved by  using a combination of  ".sk-1" and
          ".in."  We are working on a way to implement the .bx control word.
 
 
          Fonts in PHOTO Mode (SYSCHARS)
 
             When preparing text  for the SCRIPT PHOTO  typesetting system,  you
          simply enter text  and control words into  a SCRIPT file as  you would
          normally.  In addition, you must include some information about fonts.
 
             In  PHOTO mode,   SCRIPT control  words  indicate various  "logical
          fonts" (type  styles).   The  .bd (bold)   control word  overstrikes a
          character with itself,   and indicates that the  type is to be  set in
          boldface.   The .us (underscore)  control word overstrikes a character
          with an  underscore,  and  indicates that  the type  is to  be set  in
          italics.   The .bi (bold italic)  control word overstrikes a character
          with both itself and an underscore,  and indicates that the type is to
          be  set in  bold  italics.   (The  emphasized  words  in the  previous
          sentences were created with the .bd, .us, and .bi control words.)  All
          other character sequences will be set  in the normal type style (often
          called "roman").    This is  illustrated in  Table 1.    To use  these
          control words in PHOTO mode, simply enter them in your SCRIPT document
          as you would normally.
 
 
 
 
                                       Section 2:  TYPESETTING WITH SCRIPT     7
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
          +--------------------------------------------------------------------+
          |                                                                    |
          |               Table 1: Control Words for Type Faces                |
          |                                                                    |
          |--------------------------------------------------------------------|
          |  input                          |  output                          |
          |---------------------------------|----------------------------------|
          |                                 |                                  |
          |  This is roman.                 |  This is roman.                  |
          |  .us This is italic.            |  This is italic.                 |
          |  .bd This is bold.              |  This is bold.                   |
          |  .bi This is bold italic.       |  This is bold italic.            |
          +--------------------------------------------------------------------+
 
 
          Specifying Typefaces and Fonts
 
             Currently the SCRIPT  PHOTO system allows you to  use two typefaces
          provided by Printing Services: Baskerville and Souvenir.   Each may be
          set in the roman, italic, bold, and bold italic fonts.   Once you have
          decided on  the typeface,   you must tell  SCRIPT so  it can  load the
          appropriate character width tables when SCRIPT processing begins.
 
             All font definitions  in SCRIPT are specified  through tables which
          the user  can set up  with the .PH  (photo font)  control  word.   The
          construction of  these tables can  be both  tricky and tedious  to the
          user who knows little about a  phototypesetter and its fonts;  so,  to
          simplify the definition of a set of  four fonts in a document,  a font
          definition file named SYSCHARS is provided.
 
             You must specify SYSCHARS at the  beginning of your input file,  in
          the following form:
 
              .im SYSCHARS  name size  name size  name size  name size
 
          The first  "name size"  pair is used  for the  roman type  style,  the
          second for the italic  style,  the third for the bold  style,  and the
          fourth for the bold italic style.
 
             In its  simplest form,   you can  imbed SYSCHARS  with a  typestyle
          argument  of  four letters  ("bask"  for  Baskerville and  "souv"  for
          Souvenir).  For example, this command:
 
              .im SYSCHARS  bask
 
          brings in four  logical fonts for the Baskerville  type style:  roman,
          italic, bold, and bold italic.   Each is set to the default point size
          of the PSIZE= option (described elsewhere  in this document).   To set
          the same fonts with a point size of 8, you would enter:
 
              .im SYSCHARS  bask 8
 
 
 
                                       Section 2:  TYPESETTING WITH SCRIPT     8
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
             Up to four operands may be entered, one for each logical font.  For
          example, the following command:
 
              .im SYSCHARS  souv 8  souv 9  souv 12  souv 14
 
          would produce  8-point roman,   9-point italic,   12-point bold,   and
          14-point bold italic type, all in the Souvenir typeface.
 
             If you omit the "size" specification for any one of the four pairs,
          that size value will default to the value you specified for the PSIZE=
          option when you invoked SCRIPT.   If  you specify only the first "name
          and size" pair,  then the other three  pairs will default to that same
          name and size.  Acceptable point size values for the Unisetter are:
 
                6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 18, 24, 30, 36.
 
 
          Single and Double Quotation Marks
 
             The Unisetter  recognizes different  TTS character  codes for  both
          opening and closing quotation marks.   However, there is no difference
          between opening and closing quotes in the EBCDIC character code.   The
          solution is to define, in the logical fonts,  the double quote (")  as
          an opening single quote,  and the  apostrophe (')  as a closing single
          quote; this is done automatically by SYSCHARS.   Specify the quotation
          marks you want by doing the following:
 
              1.  For a single opening quote, use " (the double quotation mark).
 
              2.  For a single closing quote or an apostrophe, use ' (the single
                  quotation mark).
 
              3.  For  double opening  quotes,   use  "" (two  double  quotation
                  marks).
 
              4.  For  double closing  quotes,   use  '' (two  single  quotation
                  marks).
 
             The following  example creates  a double  opening quote  before the
          word "Let's," an apostrophe in the words "Let's" and "terminal's," and
          double closing quotes after the word "keyboard."
 
             Entered:  Sally said, ""Let's use the terminal's keyboard.''
 
             Result:   Sally said, "Let's use the terminal's keyboard."
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                       Section 2:  TYPESETTING WITH SCRIPT     9
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
          Occasional Oversetting of Lines
 
             A line  is overset if it  contains too many characters  and extends
          beyond the specified margin.   Because SCRIPT uses a different formula
          than the  Unisetter for  calculating interword  spacing,  occasionally
          SCRIPT will  put more  characters on  a line  than the  Unisetter will
          allow.  When this happens, the Unisetter takes the leftover characters
          and spreads  them across  one line.    You can  usually avoid  this by
          letting the UNIPOST  MINSP= option default to 5.   Because  you do not
          know if oversetting will occur until  your typeset galley is produced,
          the best  solution is to have  Printing Services reset lines  that are
          affected (the cost for this should be minimal).
 
 
          Defining the Page Environment for Typesetting
 
             Let's assume you know the physical  dimensions,  in inches,  of the
          output page, and the point size and leading to be used.   For example,
          you may wish  to produce a page that  is 11" long,  with  1/2" top and
          bottom margins, and page numbers at the bottom of each page.
 
             If the page is  11" long,  the page length in  points is 11"x72=792
          points.   To  determine the  number of  lines on  a page,   divide the
          leading into the  number of points on  the page.   In this  example we
          will use  10-point leading,  which  gives us  79 lines per  page.   To
          determine the number of lines per inch,  divide the number of lines on
          the page  by the  number of  inches (79  divided by  11=7.2 lines  per
          inch).   There are 7.2 lines per inch, so 1/2 " margins will equal 3.6
          SCRIPT lines  each.   To get the  proper page length,  top  and bottom
          margins, and page numbering,  you would define the vertical dimensions
          of the page with the following control words:
 
                .pl 79
                .hs 0;.hm 0;.tm 3
                .fs 1;.fm 1;.bm 4
 
             Let's also say  our text occupies 7 inches  horizontally across the
          page,  and is formatted in two  columns.   The following control words
          are used to achieve the desired result:
 
                .ll 7i
                .cd set 2
 
             The Unisetter has a maximum line length of 45 picas,  or 7.5 inches
          (.ll 7.5i).
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                      Section 2:  TYPESETTING WITH SCRIPT     10
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
          Redefining the Fonts
 
             You may sometimes wish to print the title of a document in a larger
          point size  than will  be used  for the  rest of  the document.    For
          example,  if you want to use Souvenir  type to print a newsletter that
          has the dimensions discussed earlier,  plus a "month and issue number"
          title line  set in 18-point  bold type,   you could use  the following
          sequence of SCRIPT control words:
 
                .ll 7i
                .im SYSCHARS souv 18
                .sk 18
                .bd March Newsletter
                .sk -1
                .ra;.bd;Issue 1982-03
                .sk 2
                .ph delete
                .im SYSCHARS souv 8 souv 8 souv 8 souv 10
                .cd set 2
 
             The ".ph delete " deletes the current font definitions (only needed
          for the  title line),  and the  subsequent ".im SYSCHARS"  defines the
          fonts for the body of the publication.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                      Section 2:  TYPESETTING WITH SCRIPT     11
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
          SCRIPT Set Symbols for Special Characters
 
             There are certain characters available  on the typesetter which are
          not in  the EBCDIC character set.    Set symbols have been  defined to
          allow you  to use these characters.    To use the set  symbols,  imbed
          PHOTOLIB (.im PHOTOLIB)  at the beginning of your document.   Each set
          symbol should then be preceded by an ampersand (&) when used (&$beta).
 
          +--------------------------------------------------------------------+
          |                                                                    |
          |                    Table 2: SCRIPT Set Symbols                     |
          |                                                                    |
          |--------------------------------------------------------------------|
          |          Set Symbol             | Special Character                |
          |---------------------------------|----------------------------------|
          |          $ballot                | ballot box                       |
          |          $beta                  | Greek beta                       |
          |          $check                 | check mark                       |
          |          $copyr                 | copyright sign                   |
          |          $dagger                | dagger                           |
          |          $degree                | degree sign                      |
          |          $divide                | division sign                    |
          |          $emdash                | em dash                          |
          |          $endash                | en dash (1/2 em dash)            |
          |          $emdot                 | em dot                           |
          |          $endot                 | en dot                           |
          |          $emsp                  | em space                         |
          |          $ensp                  | en space (1/2 em space)          |
          |          $lccedl                | lowercase c with cedilla accent  |
          |          $lcircum               | lowercase circumflex accent      |
          |          $lecute                | lowercase e with acute accent    |
          |          $lgrave                | lowercase grave accent           |
          |          $lntild                | lowercase n with tilde accent    |
          |          $lumlaut               | lowercase umlaut                 |
          |          $regstr                | registered sign                  |
          |          $shill                 | shilling                         |
          |          $spquest               | Latin question mark              |
          |          $spexclm               | Latin exclamation mark           |
          |          $supa                  | superscript a                    |
          |          $supo                  | superscript o                    |
          |          $thsp                  | thin space (1/3 em space)        |
          |          $uccedl                | uppercase C with cedilla accent  |
          |          $ucircum               | uppercase circumflex accent      |
          |          $ugrave                | uppercase grave accent           |
          |          $untild                | uppercase N with tilde accent    |
          |          $uumlaut               | uppercase umlaut accent          |
          +--------------------------------------------------------------------+
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                      Section 2:  TYPESETTING WITH SCRIPT     12
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
          2.B Invoking SCRIPT and UNIPOST
 
             After a  satisfactory PHOTO  file has  been produced  (as described
          elsewhere in this section), an OS batch job must be run on the IBM 370
          computer.   This job produces the TTS tape from the SCRIPT file.   Use
          the following Job Control Language:
 
               //jobname  JOB  9999-99999,'yourname'
               /*PASSWORD     password
               /*JOBPARM  T=(0,50),F=NT
               /*SETUP TAPE=(tapename,RINGIN)
               //STEP1   EXEC  SCRIPTUP,REGION=300K,
               //     OPTIONS='PHOTO,desired SCRIPT options',
               //     desired UNIPOST options
               //PREP.SYSIN DD *
               ..INC filename SCRIPT filemode (V
               /*
               //UNIPOST.UNIOUT DD DCB=(DEN=3,LRECL=1024,RECFM=F,BLKSIZE=1024),
               //        VOL=SER=tapename,UNIT=TAPE,DISP=(NEW,KEEP),LABEL=(1,NL)
 
 
          The PHOTO Option
 
             The PHOTO  option encodes SCRIPT  command information  and produces
          output that  includes text and escape  codes (see Appendix  B).   This
          option is both optional and mandatory,  depending on where it is used.
          It is optional to  use it to produce the PHOTO  file (the intermediate
          file) which you can view at your display terminal.  It is mandatory to
          include PHOTO in the UNIPOST batch job (see the JCL above).   PHOTO is
          used in place of the other  common SCRIPT output options (i.e.,  TERM,
          PRT, OFFLINE, ...) when text is to be formatted for a phototypesetting
          device.    The PHOTO  option must  be  specified when  SCRIPTing to  a
          typesetting device.
 
 
          The CPI= Option
 
             When output goes to a line  printer or terminal,  each character is
          the same width as its neighbor (e.g.,  a lowercase "i" is just as wide
          as an  uppercase "M").    But a typesetter  has characters  of varying
          widths,  so SCRIPT uses width  information provided for each character
          and fills formatted lines with as much text as will fit.
 
             A  way had  to be  devised to  leave commands  that specify  column
          numbers intact;  this includes commands such as .ll (line length)  and
          .in (indent).   The solution is to treat the operands of such commands
          as en  spaces;  the  width of one  en space is  specified by  the CPI=
          (Characters Per  Inch)  option.    SCRIPT uses  the value  of CPI=  in
          converting the line length into points,  and also in converting indent
          and offset values into points.  The default is 10 if you don't specify
          the CPI= option and a value.
 
 
 
                                      Section 2:  TYPESETTING WITH SCRIPT     13
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
             For example,   if you  specified a value  of 18  for CPI=  when you
          invoked SCRIPT,  then an ".in 3" would  result in an indent of 3/18 of
          an inch  in the  typeset output.   If  you didn't  specify CPI=  and a
          value,  ".in  3" would result  in an indent of  3/10 of an  inch.   An
          indent of 5 at CPI=10 would allow an indent of one-half inch.   A line
          length of  60 at CPI=12  (12 characters per  inch)  would make  a line
          length of five inches (60 divided by 12).
 
             If  you specify  a  value  for CPI=,   you  must  indicate it  when
          producing the PHOTO file at your display terminal and when running the
          UNIPOST job.
 
 
          The PSIZE= Option
 
             The PSIZE= option sets the default point size used by logical fonts
          (the fonts  created with  SYSCHARS).   The default  PSIZE= value  is 9
          points.  Each point equals 1/72 of an inch.  Currently, the only valid
          point sizes are the following:
 
                6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 18, 24, 30, 36.
 
             If  you specify  a value  for PSIZE=,   you must  indicate it  when
          producing the PHOTO file at your display terminal and when running the
          UNIPOST job.
 
 
          UNIPOST Options
 
             The following options may be used  to control the UNIPOST post-pro-
          cessor.  The default value is indicated by an underscore.
 
          FROM=<1|n>
 
             Indicates the  page of the document  where processing is  to begin.
          This refers to the number of physical  pages in the document,  and has
          nothing to do with the way the pages are numbered by SCRIPT.
 
          TO=<9999|n>
 
             Indicates the page of the document where processing is to end.
 
          LEADING=<12|n>
 
             Indicates the leading value,  in points,  to be used throughout the
          document.
 
          MINSP=<;4|5|6|8>
 
             Indicates the  minimum value  of the  spaceband (interword  space),
          expressed in relative  units.   Only the values shown  are valid.   To
          avoid oversetting of lines,  we recommend  that you let MINSP= default
 
 
                                      Section 2:  TYPESETTING WITH SCRIPT     14
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
          to 5.   This option works in conjunction with the font tables,  and we
          have found that MINSP=5 produces the best results on the Unisetter.
 
          TRNLEN=&lt;80|n>
 
             Indicates the  length of  the output  line for  the translated  TTS
          code.   Lines longer  than this are broken into  multiple lines.   The
          value for this parameter may range from 80 to 132.
 
          TRNSL=&lt;0|1>
 
             Indicates whether or not the translated  version of the TTS code is
          to be printed; a 0 means don't print and a 1 means print.
 
 
          The TRNSL=1 Option
 
             If you specify  the UNIPOST option TRNSL=1 in your  batch job,  you
          will get printed output which shows  the translated version of the TTS
          codes.   The TTS  codes used by the Unisetter will  be translated into
          printable characters  which are a bit  easier to read  and understand.
          (See Appendix D for sample SCRIPT post-processor output.)
 
             Below are examples of the output symbols and their meanings:
 
          <EM>  EM SPACE - A blank space equal in width to the point size of the
                typeface in use.
 
          <EN>  EN SPACE - A  blank space equal in width to  the numerals in the
                typeface in use.
 
          <EP>  EM PRECEDENCE - A special code used to generate some typesetting
                commands and also some printable characters.
 
          <QC>  QUAD CENTER - Indicates that text is  to be centered on the line
                measure.
 
          <QL>  QUAD LEFT - Indicates that text is  to be positioned on the left
                margin of the line measure.
 
          <QR>  QUAD RIGHT  - Indicates  that text  is to  be positioned  on the
                right margin of the line measure.
 
          <RE>  RETURN - Indicates that the end of a line,  paragraph,  block of
                copy,  etc.  has been reached,   and that subsequent text should
                begin on a new line.
 
          <TS>  THIN SPACE - A  blank space equal to the width of  a period or a
                comma in the typeface in use.
 
          <.S>  SHIFT - Indicates that an uppercase character follows.
 
 
 
                                      Section 2:  TYPESETTING WITH SCRIPT     15
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
          <.U>  UNSHIFT -  Used after SHIFT  to revert to  lowercase characters;
                for   example,    the   word  "Washington"   would   appear   as
                <.S>W<.U>ashington.
 
          <.$>  SUPERSHIFT  -  A  delimiter  which   appears  before  and  after
                Unisetter  typesetting  commands;    for  example,   <.$>P09<.$>
                indicates that 9-point type is to be used.
 
          <..>  TAPE FEED - Dummy characters used to fill out a record.
 
          <>    BELL CODE  - Tells the typesetter  to stop;  this code  is found
                near the end of your output.
 
 
          Taking a Tape to Printing Services
 
             After you've run the post-processor batch job, you may pick up your
          tape  at the  UKCC  Data  Center.   You  may  then  take the  tape  to
          University Printing Services, 555 South Upper Street.  You should also
          take a  computer-produced copy of the  formatted SCRIPT file,   so the
          typesetting operator will know what is on your tape.   The typesetting
          operator  will transfer  your text  to a  floppy disk  (a device  that
          resembles a flexible phonograph record).  The floppy disk will be read
          by  the Unisetter  and  a galley  of typeset  copy  will be  produced.
          Printing Services will call you when your  typeset text is ready to be
          picked up.
 
             Don't forget the importance of scheduling work in advance.  Allow a
          day for writing the text onto tape  at the Computing Center,  and give
          Printing several days to prepare the typeset text.   Let Printing know
          in advance when you will be bringing a  tape to them and when you will
          need the typeset text.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                      Section 2:  TYPESETTING WITH SCRIPT     16
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
          Section 3:  TYPESETTING WITH TTSTRAN
 
 
 
             The TTSTRAN phototypesetting system was  created to reduce the cost
          of producing typeset text.   The system is designed to do a character-
          for-character translation  from the IBM  EBCDIC code to  the Unisetter
          TTS  code.   TTSTRAN  is  for users  who  have  very little  computing
          experience, but who want to save money on typesetting.
 
             Presently the system consists of the following steps:
 
              1.  You create a SCRIPT file at a computer terminal and enter text
                  to be typeset into the file.
 
              2.  You remove any SCRIPT control words you may have entered.
 
              3.  You insert typesetting codes (this is optional).
 
              4.  You submit a batch job at the Computing Center that translates
                  the SCRIPT file into TTS code and writes it onto a tape.
 
              5.  You take the tape to Printing Services, along with a computer-
                  printed copy of the text in the file;  if possible, you should
                  also take an example of the desired format.
 
              6.  Printing Services copies the text onto a floppy disk.
 
              7.  The  typesetting  operator  at  Printing  Services  makes  any
                  necessary  corrections  to  the  text  and  enters  additional
                  typesetting codes, if needed.
 
              8.  The disk is read by the Unisetter phototypesetter.
 
              9.  A galley of typeset text is produced.
 
             The cost of phototypesetting is  significantly reduced if,  instead
          of having a typesetting operator enter your text at Printing Services,
          you enter  the text  yourself at  a computer  terminal.   The  cost is
          further  reduced if  you also  enter the  typesetting codes  yourself.
          However,  this  is optional.    The typesetting  operator at  Printing
          Services can  add these codes  after the text  has been copied  onto a
          floppy disk.   If you decide to  enter the typesetting codes yourself,
          you will  need to learn  the codes used  by the Unisetter  at Printing
          Services; these codes are described later in this section.
 
             If you decide to use this system, it is important that you schedule
          your typesetting work in advance.    Please let Printing Services know
          several days ahead of  time when you will be bringing  them a tape and
          when you will need the typeset text.
 
 
 
                                     Section 3:  TYPESETTING WITH TTSTRAN     17
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
          Creating SCRIPT Files
 
             SCRIPT is  a text-processing  computer program  that allows  you to
          format documents;  for example, you can center, underline, indent, and
          justify lines with the  use of SCRIPT.   If you do  not already have a
          Computing Center account (a project number and a CJS userid), you will
          need to open one  in order to gain access to the  IBM 370 computer and
          the SCRIPT program.  Information on setting up an account may be found
          in the  Introduction to the UK  Computing Center,  a  free publication
          available in the UKCC Consulting Room, 110 McVey Hall.
 
             When you  have your project  number and  userid,  you are  ready to
          logon to a terminal and create  SCRIPT files.   It is generally easier
          to enter text at a display-type terminal with a screen, rather than at
          a printer-type  terminal.   If you do  not have access to  a terminal,
          public terminal  rooms are  located on the  UK (Lexington)   campus in
          McVey Hall,  King  Library,  Patterson Office Tower,   and the Student
          Center.
 
             You create  a SCRIPT file  by entering  a command in  the following
          format:
 
                xedit  filename  script
 
          where "filename"  is the name  you choose for  the file.   XEDIT  is a
          text-editing  program  that  can  be used  to  perform  basic  editing
          functions;  it allows you to add, delete,  move,  copy,  and duplicate
          lines, etc.
 
             If you don't already know how to enter and edit text at a terminal,
          you may  want to buy  a copy of the  IBM System Product  Editor User's
          Guide,  available at  the University Bookstore in  the Student Center;
          this guide explains XEDIT editing commands in detail.  You do not need
          to know much about SCRIPT to create SCRIPT files, since SCRIPT control
          words are not used  by TTSTRAN.   However,  if you want  to learn more
          about SCRIPT  and CJS,   the UKCC  SCRIPT User's  Guide,  UKCC  SCRIPT
          Reference, UKCC CJS User's Guide, and UKCC CJS Reference are available
          at  the University  Bookstore or  through  the MANUAL  command in  CJS
          (enter the HELP MANUAL command for more information).
 
             After you have created a SCRIPT file,  you can enter text by simply
          typing it at the keyboard of a  terminal.   If you wish,  you can also
          enter SCRIPT control  words (.ce to center text,  .fo  to format text,
          .us to  underscore,  and so on).    Insertion of SCRIPT  control words
          enables you  to produce  a computer-printed copy  of your  document in
          formatted form;   this makes  proofreading easier  and gives  Printing
          Services  a  better idea  of  how  you  want  your document  to  look.
          However, before you write the file to tape, you must remove all SCRIPT
          control  words.   This  is because  the Unisetter  does not  recognize
          SCRIPT control  words,  and will simply  typeset them along  with your
          text.
 
             When all control words have been removed, you may enter typesetting
          codes.   The Unisetter  recognizes typesetting codes because  they are
 
 
                                     Section 3:  TYPESETTING WITH TTSTRAN     18
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
          surrounded by delimiters called  "supershifts".   Supershifts are much
          like the period that precedes a  SCRIPT control word;  both indicate a
          command.   TTSTRAN  requires you to enter  a ¬ (not sign)   before and
          after typesetting codes.  The ¬ is translated to a supershift, and the
          next character is the code.   For  example,  entering ¬QC¬ in the file
          indicates QUAD CENTER (quad is a printing term used in several codes).
          ¬QC¬ is  inserted after a  line you  want centered.   ¬QR¬  means QUAD
          RIGHT,  and is  inserted after a line you want  positioned against the
          right margin.
 
             The QUAD  LEFT code is  inserted after  a line you  want positioned
          against  the left  margin;  for  example,  after  the last  line in  a
          paragraph.  Because QUAD LEFT is used so often, it is represented by a
          single character:  # (a pound  sign).   No supershifting is necessary.
          Using  one character  for this  function cuts  down on  the number  of
          keystrokes needed, and thus is more efficient.
 
             RETURN is  indicated with the  _ (underscore).   Again,   no super-
          shifting is necessary.    The RETURN code indicates that the  end of a
          line (or paragraph, heading,  block of copy,  etc.)  has been reached,
          and that any text following the underscore should start on a new line.
 
 
          Quotation Marks in TTSTRAN
 
             The Unisetter  recognizes different  TTS character  codes for  both
          opening and closing quotation marks.   However, there is no difference
          between opening and closing quotes in the EBCDIC character code.   The
          solution is  for TTSTRAN to  use the double  quote (")  as  an opening
          single quote, and the apostrophe (') as a closing single quote.
 
              1.  For a single opening quote, use " (the double quotation mark).
 
              2.  For a single closing quote or an apostrophe, use ' (the single
                  quotation mark).
 
              3.  For  double opening  quotes,   use  "" (two  double  quotation
                  marks).
 
              4.  For  double closing  quotes,   use  '' (two  single  quotation
                  marks).
 
             The following  example creates  a double  opening quote  before the
          word "Let's," an apostrophe in the words "Let's" and "terminal's," and
          double closing quotes after the word "keyboard."
 
             Entered:  Sally said, ""Let's use the terminal's keyboard.''
 
             Result:   Sally said, "Let's use the terminal's keyboard."
 
 
 
 
 
                                     Section 3:  TYPESETTING WITH TTSTRAN     19
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
          Writing the File onto a Tape
 
             Once you  have entered  your text  and inserted  typesetting codes,
          you're ready to have the file written onto a magnetic tape.   You will
          need at least two 7" reels  of magnetic tape (called mini-reels).   It
          is best to have two tapes so that  one can serve as a back-up.   These
          tapes may be  purchased at the Computing Center Main  Office (72 McVey
          Hall)  for $10 each.   Office hours are  from 8:00 a.m.  to 4:30 p.m.,
          Monday through Friday.
 
                After you've  obtained your tapes,   take them to  the Computing
          Center Data Center (61 McVey Hall).   Specify that the tapes are to be
          unlabeled, 1600 BPI tapes,  and that they are to be "temporary" tapes.
          This means you will always return to pick them up within 48 hours.
 
             The first time you  bring tapes to the Data Center,   you must fill
          out tape stickers listing your name, project number, and so on.   Each
          time you write text onto a tape you  will turn the tape in at the Data
          Center, where you will fill out a temporary tape sticker.
 
             You will  use a  special computer program  called TTSTRAN  to write
          your file onto  a tape.   The TTSTRAN program converts  your text from
          EBCDIC code  to TTS  code (which  the Unisetter  can read),   and then
          writes the output onto a magnetic tape.
 
             The section "TTSTRAN JCL" is very  important,  because it lists the
          Job Control Language  (JCL)  statements for TTSTRAN.    You must enter
          these statements into  a file before you can run  the TTSTRAN program.
          You  can name  the file  containing the  JCL anything  you want;   for
          example, you may call it TYPE JOB or TYPESET JOB, etc.
 
             Your job should be completed and your tape ready to be picked up at
          the Data Center about a day after the job was submitted.
 
 
          Taking a Tape to Printing Services
 
             After you've picked up your tape  at the Computing Center,  you can
          take it to Printing Services (555 South Upper Street).  Take a comput-
          er-produced copy of the file, also.  Indicate on the copy how you want
          the text formatted, where it needs special treatment,  etc.   Make the
          instructions as clear  as possible so the  typesetting operator under-
          stands what you want,  and so your text will be typeset exactly as you
          wish.  If possible, take a copy of the text in formatted form as well.
          If you haven't already decided on type styles and sizes,  discuss this
          with the typesetting operator.
 
             The typesetting operator  will transfer your text to  a floppy disk
          (a device that resembles a flexible  phonograph record),  which can be
          read by the  Unisetter.   The operator will  then scan your text  on a
          display  screen to  check for  possible  errors (missing  supershifts,
          incorrect codes).   These errors will be corrected and any typesetting
          codes you want but cannot enter (baseline rules, bullets,  etc.)  will
 
 
                                     Section 3:  TYPESETTING WITH TTSTRAN     20
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
          be added.   After  all additions and corrections have  been made,  the
          floppy disk will be read by the Unisetter and a galley of typeset copy
          will be produced.
 
             Printing Services will call you when  your typeset text is ready to
          be picked up.   Check your galley carefully for mistakes.   More often
          than not,  you'll find  that errors are your own,  so  be very careful
          when entering text  and typesetting codes.   It's easy to  leave out a
          supershift or a RETURN code.
 
             Don't forget the importance of scheduling work in advance.  Allow a
          day for writing the text onto tape  at the Computing Center,  and give
          Printing several days to prepare the typeset text.   Let Printing know
          in advance when you will be bringing a  tape to them and when you will
          need the  typeset text.    Do not expect  to drop a  tape off  with no
          advance notice and get your galley that same day.
 
 
          Input Text Requirements
 
             The TTSTRAN program accepts,  as input,  variable-length records of
          up to  80 characters.   Trailing blanks  are eliminated from  the text
          during translation.  The following are requirements for input text:
 
              1.  Record length of up to 80 bytes.
 
              2.  Input text must be unblocked.
 
              3.  No SCRIPT commands within text.  SCRIPT commands are processed
                  as text and will not supply the desired results.
 
              4.  Uppercase and lowercase characters are allowed.
 
              5.  Input must be in EBCDIC code.
 
              6.  The PARM=TRANS  option may be used  on the EXEC card  to print
                  the EBCDIC text that is  translated.   This will allow verifi-
                  cation that the entire text is translated.
 
 
          Output Requirements
 
             Requirements for output are:
 
              1.  Unlabeled, mini-reel, 1600 BPI tape.
 
              2.  The tape records are 1K bytes long.
 
              3.  Output is written on tape as TTS code.
 
              4.  Output  can be  printed out  in EBCDIC  for verification,   if
                  desired.
 
 
                                     Section 3:  TYPESETTING WITH TTSTRAN     21
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
          TTSTRAN JCL
 
             The following Job  Control Language statements should  be used when
          submitting a  variable-length file  from CJS.    (Uppercase characters
          should appear exactly  as shown below;  lowercase  characters indicate
          items which should be specified by the user.)
 
               //jobname  JOB  9999-99999,'yourname'
               /*PASSWORD     password
               /*JOBPARM  T=(0,10)
               /*SETUP TAPE=(tapename,RINGIN)
               //STEP1 EXEC PGM=CJSPREP
               //SYSPRINT DD SYSOUT=A
               //SYSUT1 DD *
               ..INC fn ft fm (V
               //SYSUT2 DD DSN=&&TEMP,DISP=(NEW,PASS),UNIT=SYSDA,SPACE=(CYL,(5,1))
               //STEP2 EXEC PGM=TTSTRAN,PARM=TRANS
               //STEPLIB DD DISP=SHR,DSNAME=SYS1.FOTOLIB
               //VIPIN DD DSN=&&TEMP,DISP=(OLD,DELETE)
               //VIPOUT DD DCB=(DEN=3,LRECL=1024,RECFM=F,BLKSIZE=1024),
               //          VOL=SER=tapename,UNIT=TAPE,DISP=(NEW,KEEP),LABEL=(1,NL)
               //TRNSLT DD SYSOUT=A,DCB=(LRECL=81,RECFM=FA,BLKSIZE=81)
               /*
 
             Where: jobname     is the name you have given this job;
                                the jobname must begin in column 3.
                    9999-99999  is your Computing Center account number.
                    yourname    is your name.
                    password    is your password; the password must
                                begin in column 16.
                    T=(0,10)    is the time parameter; this must begin
                                in column 12.
                    tapename    is the name of the tape upon which your
                                file is to be written.
                    fn          is the filename of the file to be translated.
                    ft          is the filetype of the file to be translated;
                                this is generally SCRIPT.
                    fm          is the filemode of the file to be translated;
                                this is almost always A1.
 
             The "T=(0,10)" is the time parameter,  which tells the computer how
          long the job should be allowed to  run,  in minutes and seconds.   The
          example  indicates  that the  job  should  not  take longer  than  ten
          seconds;  this should be more than  enough time for most TTSTRAN users
          (it  takes  about  one  and  one-half  seconds  to  translate  a  file
          containing 800  lines).   However,   if the file  to be  translated is
          exceptionally long,  you may want to  increase the time parameter by a
          few seconds so the job isn't stopped before it has completed.
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                     Section 3:  TYPESETTING WITH TTSTRAN     22
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
          Basic Typesetting Codes
 
             The  following  are  basic  typesetting  codes  recognized  by  the
          Unisetter at  Printing Services.   Standard printing  measurements are
          used:  12 points equal one pica, six picas equal one inch.
 
             Before you enter any typesetting codes  for the first time,  it's a
          good idea to take a sample of your text (or better yet,  an example of
          how you want the formatted document to look) to Printing Services.  An
          operator can mark your copy with the codes you should insert.
 
             The four codes below specify line  length,  type style,  type size,
          and leading.    The selected values for  these codes remain  in effect
          until new values are specified.
 
             ¬SM4210¬  SET MEASURE.    Indicates line  length (how  wide the
                       text should be).   Consists of four digits,  with the
                       first two representing picas and  the last two repre-
                       senting points.    In the example  the measure  is 42
                       picas, 10 points.
 
             ¬F1¬      FONT or  FACE.   Indicates  the typeface  to be  used
                       (e.g., roman, bold, italic).  Consists of one digit.
 
             ¬P09¬     POINT SIZE.    Indicates the  type size,   in points.
                       Consists  of two  digits.    ¬P09¬ specifies  9-point
                       type, ¬P12¬ specifies 12-point type, and so on.
 
             ¬SL110¬   SET LEADING.    Indicates how many points  of leading
                       (white space)  are to be set between lines.   Leading
                       values from  0 to  99 may  be selected  in point  and
                       half-point increments,  with three  digits entered at
                       all times.   The  leading size should be  equal to or
                       greater than the point size;  a two-point increase is
                       generally adequate  (e.g.,  9-point  type works  well
                       with 11-point leading).   In the example, the leading
                       specified is 11 points.  Half-point increments may be
                       selected by entering  the digit one (1)   in place of
                       the zero (0)  value;  for example,  ¬SL111¬ would set
                       the leading at 11 1/2 points.
 
             You may enter  all four of the  above codes within the  same super-
          shifts:  ¬SM4210F1P09SL110¬
 
             Once values for the above codes have been specified,  the following
          codes may  be used to  position text,  to  end and begin  lines,  etc.
          These codes are to be entered directly after text; it is not necessary
          to leave a blank space between the text and the code.  (Note: the term
          "line measure" refers to the line  length specified by the SET MEASURE
          code described above.)
 
             #         QUAD LEFT.   Place after text to be positioned on the
                       left margin of the line measure.  No supershifting is
                       needed.  Must be followed by the RETURN code (#_)  to
 
 
                                     Section 3:  TYPESETTING WITH TTSTRAN     23
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
                       activate line space for the next line. Used after the
                       last line in a paragraph, after headings, etc.
 
             ¬QR¬      QUAD RIGHT.  Place after text to be positioned on the
                       right margin of the line measure. Must be followed by
                       the RETURN code  (¬QR¬_)  to activate line  space for
                       the next line.
 
             ¬QC¬      QUAD CENTER.   Place after text to be centered on the
                       line measure.   Must  be followed by the  RETURN code
                       (¬QC¬_) to activate line space for the next line.
 
             _         RETURN.    An  underscore indicates  RETURN.   RETURN
                       activates line  space for the  next line;   no super-
                       shifting is needed.   Used at the end of a paragraph,
                       heading, etc., to indicate that subsequent text is to
                       begin on  a new  line.  Normal text  does not  need a
                       RETURN code until a new paragraph is desired.
 
             ¬IS¬      INSERT SPACE.  Inserts blank space of various propor-
                       tions  at  any  position  in   a  line.   Useful  for
                       multi-part headings  to be spread  out evenly  on one
                       line.  INSERT SPACE is a  justifying function and all
                       lines must be ended with the RETURN code.
 
             ¬IL¬      INSERT LEADERS.    Inserts a line of  leaders (dots).
                       INSERT LEADERS is a justifying function and all lines
                       must be ended with the RETURN code.
 
             ¬IR¬      INSERT  RULE.   Inserts  a rule.   INSERT  RULE is  a
                       justifying function and all lines  must be ended with
                       the RETURN code.
 
             Some codes cannot be entered at your terminal,  but can be inserted
          by the typesetting operator; these include baseline rules and bullets.
          If you need  these codes,  simply indicate them  on your computer-pro-
          duced copy and the operator will insert them.
 
 
          Setting Tabs in TTSTRAN
 
             You can also set tab columns  with certain typesetting codes.   Tab
          columns are defined with the Tab Number  (TB),  Set Tab (ST),  and Set
          Tab Measure (SM) codes.   You may have up to eight Tab Numbers; if you
          need more than  eight tab columns,  the typesetting  operator can help
          you.   Set Tab  is the tab position,   defined in picas and  points in
          relation to  the left margin.    Tab Measure is  the width of  the tab
          column in picas and points.  For example:
 
                ¬TB1ST0000SM0700¬¬TB2ST0803SM0400¬
 
          would set Tab Number One (TB1)  at the left margin of the line measure
          (ST0000),  and  the tab measure  or width of  the tab column  at seven
 
 
                                     Section 3:  TYPESETTING WITH TTSTRAN     24
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
          picas and zero  points (SM0700).   Tab Number Two (TB2)   would be set
          eight picas and  three points from the left margin  (ST0803),  and the
          tab measure would be four picas wide (SM0400).
 
             Setting  tabs can  be tricky.    It's  best to  have a  typesetting
          operator help  you the first  time,  especially with  complex tabbing.
          Once you've  entered your tab  settings,  you  don't have to  type the
          numbers in again  unless you want to  change them.   When you  want to
          call a tab,  you simply type ¬TB1¬,  ¬TB2¬,  etc.  directly before the
          text to  be set at  that tab position.    The tab positions  remain in
          effect until you change them.
 
             IMPORTANT:   Use  the ¬CR¬  code (CARRIAGE  RESET)  to  restore the
          overall measure of the line.   It is very important to enter this code
          after you have finished tabbing;  otherwise, text following the tabbed
          data may not be formatted correctly.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                     Section 3:  TYPESETTING WITH TTSTRAN     25
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
          APPENDIX A:   Glossary
 
 
 
          NOTE: Some of the definitions use terms which are defined elsewhere in
          the glossary.
 
          ascender
             The vertical portion  of a lowercase character  which extends above
             the body or x-height of the character; the upper stroke.
 
          automatic font
             The logical font chosen automatically by SCRIPT,  based on the type
             of input;  a roman typeface is  chosen for normal text,  italic for
             underlined text, bold for text that is overstruck with itself,  and
             bold italic for text that is both overstruck and underlined.
 
          baseline
             An  imaginary line  on  which the  bottom  of  an uppercase  letter
             appears to rest.   Lowercase letters such  as "i" and "e" also rest
             on the baseline.
 
          condensed
             A typeface  in which  the height of  a character  is proportionally
             greater than its width.
 
          descender
             The part of a letter that extends below the baseline;  the downward
             stroke.
 
          EBCDIC
             An abbreviation for Extended Binary Coded Decimal Interchange Code,
             a  widely used  coding  system for  representing  data in  computer
             storage.
 
          em space
             A blank space equal  in width to the point size of  a font.   An em
             space is 18 relative units wide.    It is used for paragraph inden-
             tation and  alignment of  type columns.   (A  10-point em  space is
             really a  square that is  10 points wide  and 10 points  high.   In
             early fonts the letter M was usually  cast on a square body,  hence
             the name "em.")
 
          en space
             A blank space equal in width to the figures (numerals)  of the type
             in use.   It is usually 9 units wide,   but it can be 8,  9,  or 10
             units wide.  At one time the en space was one half the width of the
             em space.
 
          expanded
             A typeface  in which  the width  of a  character is  proportionally
             greater than its height.
 
 
                                                    Appendix A:  Glossary     26
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
          family of type
             All the variations of  a basic type design in every  point size and
             style.   Examples  of the variations  in type style  include light,
             medium, italic, bold, extra bold, condensed, and expanded.
 
          fixed space
             A blank space  of a fixed width.    The three fixed spaces  used in
             typesetting are the em space, en space, and thin space.
 
          flush left
             Type which is set even with the left margin; also called quad left.
 
          flush right
             Type which  is set even  with the  right margin;  also  called quad
             right.
 
          font
             The complete set of characters in a given typeface and point size.
 
          gutter
             The white space between columns of type.
 
          inferiors
             Characters smaller than the type size,   positioned on or below the
             baseline; subscripts.
 
          justification
             Spacing a line of type to fill the selected line length.
 
          leading
             (pronounced "LED-ing")  (1)  The blank space between lines of type,
             measured in points.   It is measured  from the baseline of one line
             of type to the baseline of the following line.   (2) A parameter of
             the UNIPOST program used to specify the leading of a document.
 
          logical font
             The font defined by a set of .PH control words,  specifying a table
             of characters for a specific  typeface.   Some examples are BASKROM
             (BASKerville ROMan)   and SOUVBDIT (SOUVenir BolD  ITalic).   These
             logical font tables are set up  through the SYSCHARS file which you
             imbed  one  or  more  times in  your  document.    The  first  four
             characters  of  the font  name  are  the  same  as the  first  four
             characters of the type style; e.g., BASK for Baskerville.  The last
             three or  four characters are one  of the following:    ROM,  ITAL,
             BOLD, BDIT.
 
          overset
             Type set in excess of the specified line length; more characters on
             a line than the line length will allow.
 
          pagination
             The assembly of the various components of a page of type; i.e., the
             assembly of text,  page numbers,  and running headings and footings
             into a complete page as it will appear in the publication.
 
 
                                                    Appendix A:  Glossary     27
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
          PHOTO
             The option which  you must specify in  SCRIPT to make it  produce a
             SYSPRINT file  containing escape codes  and text for  the Unisetter
             phototypesetter.
 
          phototypesetting
             Composing  type  by shining  a  light  source through  a  character
             matrix,  then  through a lens  onto photosensitive paper  or photo-
             graphic film.
 
          pi characters
             Miscellaneous characters  such as  bullets,  stars,   arrows,  etc.
             These characters are usually kept on a separate font.
 
          pica
             A printer's unit of measurement, used in measuring line lengths.  A
             pica is equal to 1/6 of an inch.    There are 12 points to one pica
             or 72 points  to one inch.   There  is a maximum line  length of 45
             picas (7.5 inches) on the Unisetter.
 
          point
             A division of the pica.  There are 12 points to a pica or 72 points
             to an inch,   so 1 point is 1/72  of an inch.   All  type sizes are
             measured in points.
 
          point size
             The  height  of  type  from the  highest  ascender  to  the  lowest
             descender, plus a small shoulder of extra space.
 
          relative units
             Fractional units of space that are  in proportion to the type size.
             A relative  unit is  1/18 of an  em space for  the type  size being
             used,  so a  relative unit for 12-point type is  bigger in absolute
             measurement than a relative unit for 8-point type.
 
          relative width
             (1) The width of a single character.   (2) One of the parameters of
             the .PH control word in SCRIPT.
 
          sans serif
             Type having  no serifs and little  contrast between thick  and thin
             strokes.
 
          serif
             A light line or stroke projecting from  the ends of the main stroke
             of a roman letter.
 
          set solid
             Type which is set with the leading equal to the type size; i.e., no
             extra white space between lines.
 
          spaceband
             The expandable  interword space placed  between words to  justify a
             line.   The  spaceband is  normally assigned a  minimum width  of 4
 
 
                                                    Appendix A:  Glossary     28
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
             units.
 
          superiors
             Characters smaller in size than  the regular text type,  positioned
             above the baseline; superscripts.
 
          thin space
             The width of a period or comma in a font; usually 6 units.
 
          TTS
             An abbreviation  for "teletypesetter."   TTS refers  to a  standard
             coding scheme widely used in  the typesetting industry.   The codes
             use a  maximum of six  binary bits,  so  there are 64  unique codes
             possible.
 
          TTSTRAN
             A program which  will translate EBCDIC code to TTS  code.   It also
             translates certain character sequences to typesetting commands.
 
          typeface
             A specific design of type; e.g., Baskerville Bold, Souvenir Italic.
 
          UNIPOST
             The post-processor program which converts a SCRIPT SYSPRINT file to
             the  TTS  characters and  commands  used  by the  Unisetter.    The
             SYSPRINT file must have been produced with the PHOTO option.
 
          Unisetter
             The phototypesetting  machine for which the  UNIPOST post-processor
             produces TTS code.   It is  manufactured by the Compugraphic Corpo-
             ration.
 
          units
             Another name for relative units.
 
          x-height
             The height of  a lowercase letter such  as the "x."  The  body of a
             lowercase letter which has  an ascender (such as "b" or  "d")  or a
             descender (such as "p" or "y").
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                    Appendix A:  Glossary     29
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
          APPENDIX B:   Photo Escape Codes
 
 
 
             The Photo Escape Codes listed below  are inserted into the interme-
          diate  PHOTO file  produced by  SCRIPT.   These  codes determine  what
          Unisetter typesetting  commands will  be produced  by UNIPOST.    They
          specify such parameters as photographic film movement,  the font to be
          used,  and  the point size of  the characters.   The  escape character
          X'27' (denoted by "*")  is used  with other characters to denote these
          special escape codes.    Some escape codes are followed  by a halfword
          value in binary;   this is denoted by  "nn."  In all cases  except the
          space escape code, the value "nn" indicates the number of "en spaces."
 
             The first record of each page, the Title Header (TH), also provides
          the number  of "en  spaces" that occur  per inch  horizontally.   Each
          record of output from SCRIPT is expected to start with an escape code.
 
             The following escape codes may be found in an output PHOTO file:
 
          *THnncc   (Title Heading)
               This  record  is  placed  in  the   PHOTO  file  every  time  the
               top-of-page in the user document  is reached.   Its normal effect
               is to draw a page separator line of  length nn on the film and to
               cause various  control parameters to be  reissued in case  a file
               must be backspaced or restarted.
               The  cc  value tells  how  many  "en  spaces"  there are  in  one
               horizontal inch.
 
          *TFnn     (Title Footing)
               This record is placed in the PHOTO  file every time the bottom of
               a page in the user document is reached.   Its normal effect is to
               draw a page separator line of length nn on the film.
 
          *JBnn     (Justify Both)
               The text  line which follows is  to be printed in  formatted mode
               with a line length of nn.
 
          *JCnn     (Justify Center)
               The  text line  which follows  is to  be centered  within a  line
               length of nn.
 
          *JLnn     (Justify Left)
               The text line which  follows is to be right ragged  format with a
               line length of nn.
 
          *JRnn     (Justify Right)
               The text  line which  follows is to  be right  aligned to  a line
               length of nn.
 
 
 
 
                                          Appendix B:  Photo Escape Codes     30
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
          *INnn     (Indent)
               The logical left  margin of text which follows is  to be indented
               nn.
 
          *ITnn     (Indent Mark Tab)
               The logical right margin of preceding  text is to be justified to
               nn.   The  logical left  margin of  text which  follows is  to be
               indented nn.
 
          *MCnn     (Multiple Column)
               This indicates the initial column  position where subsequent text
               in justify escapes is to begin.
 
          *SPnn     (Space)
               Indicates the number  of lines the film is to  be advanced.   The
               spacing between lines is determined by the current leading value.
 
          *LFnn     (Line Feed)
               Indicates a return  to the leftmost column with  no film advance.
               This simulates the  action of a terminal doing  a carriage return
               with  no  linefeed.   This  sequence  will  be generated  when  a
               ".SP-1" is encountered in the input stream.   The halfword value
               is currently  always set to  0 and  might be used  in conjunction
               with the reverse leading feature on models with this facility.
 
          *CM       (Comment)
               This causes the rest of the input to be ignored.  The rest of the
               line  could be  reflected  to the  user or  the  operator of  the
               phototypesetter.    Such comments  are  generated  by the  Output
               Comment (.OC) control word.
 
          *U        (Superscript)
               This escape  sequence provides the same  action as if  a negative
               half linefeed is entered at a  terminal.   The film will be moved
               up half the  current leading value and the current  point size is
               reduced by one-third.   This action will take place any time a *U
               is encountered.    The next occurrence of  *D will move  the film
               down half the  current leading value and increase  the point size
               by 1.5 times.
 
          *D        (Subscript)
               This  escape sequence  provides  the same  action  as  if a  half
               linefeed is entered at a terminal.    The film will be moved down
               half the  current leading  value and  the current  point size  is
               reduced by one-third.   This action will take place any time a *D
               is encountered.   The next occurrence of *U will move the film up
               half the  current leading value and  increase the point  size 1.5
               times.
 
          *PFnn     (Font Number)
               This escape sequence will select font number nn on the typesetter
               for subsequent text.   The font information came from the logical
               font definitions within SCRIPT.
 
 
 
                                          Appendix B:  Photo Escape Codes     31
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
          *PSnn     (Point Size)
               This escape  sequence will  select point  size nn  for subsequent
               text.   The  point size  information came  from the  logical font
               definitions within SCRIPT.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                          Appendix B:  Photo Escape Codes     32
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
               APPENDIX C:   UNIPOST Datasets
 
 
 
             The following  DD statements  are required  to access  UNIPOST data
          sets when running the UNIPOST post-processor.
 
          UNIIN
 
          This  is  the input  file  consisting  of  escape sequences  and  text
          produced  by  the  SCRIPT  SYSPRINT file  when  the  PHOTO  option  is
          specified.   The record format may be fixed or variable and the record
          length may range up to 504.
 
          SYSPRINT
 
          This is the output file used  for displaying font usage,  status,  and
          error messages.   The  record format may be variable or  fixed and the
          record length should be 132.
 
          UNICOM
 
          This is the  output file used for displaying text  associated with the
          comment escape  code (see  Appendix B).   SYSCHARS  uses this  file to
          display font information.   The record format may be variable or fixed
          and the record length should be 132.
 
          UNITRNL
 
          This output  file provides a translation  of the TTS codes  written to
          the UNIOUT file.  Each byte in the UNIOUT file is translated to one or
          more printable characters.   The record format is fixed and the record
          length should be 132.
 
          UNIOUT
 
          This is the primary output file  for the post processor.   It contains
          the TTS  control codes and  text that will  be read by  the Unisetter.
          The record format  for this file must  be fixed and the  record length
          must be 1024.   If printed,  it is  desirable but not necessary to use
          the TN print train.  (See Appendix D for sample output.)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                            Appendix C:  UNIPOST Datasets     33
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
          APPENDIX D:   Sample Data
 
 
 
          Sample SCRIPT Input
 
          .im SYSCHARS souv 9
          .rt top /Unisetter test/-%-/Document: STYPE/
          .pp This is your last chance to renew your subscription to
          .ul;The Kentucky Register.
          If you haven't already renewed, just return the form in this issue
          and you will continue to receive the newsletter each month, free of
          charge. Otherwise, your name will be deleted from the mailing list
          and this issue will be the last one you receive.
          .sk
          .pp Please supply a complete, legible mailing address to ensure
          delivery.
          Use a University of Kentucky campus address whenever possible, as this
          allows us to save on postage costs. When using a UK campus address,
          please be sure to include the Speed Sort Code.
 
 
          Sample SCRIPT Post-processor Output
 
          ** UNI VERSION 3.7
          FONT   1  IS  Souvenir Light Roman FontŸŸŸŸŸŸŸŸŸŸ
          FONT   2  IS  Souvenir Light Italic FontŸŸŸŸŸŸŸŸŸŸ
          FONT   3  IS  Souvenir Demi Bold FontŸŸŸŸŸŸŸŸŸŸ
          FONT   4  IS  UNUSED FONT
          UNI TERMINATED SUCCESSFULLY AFTER    56 INPUT RECORDS AND
               1 PAGES FROM PAGE     1.
          ** UNI VERSION 3.7
          *
          *FONT    1 Souvenir Light Roman FontŸŸŸŸŸŸŸŸŸŸ
          *FONT    2 Souvenir Light Italic FontŸŸŸŸŸŸŸŸŸŸ
          *FONT    3 Souvenir Demi Bold FontŸŸŸŸŸŸŸŸŸŸ
          *FONT    4 UNUSED FONT
          <€$>SM3600<€$><€$>SL120<€$><€$>F1<€$><€$>MN08<€$><€$>MX18<€$><€$
               >P12<.$><.$>IR<.$><RE>
          <RE>
          <RE>
          <RE>
          <RE>
          <€$>P09<€$><€S>U<€U>nisetter test<QL><RE>
          <€$>RL120<€$><€U>-<€S>1<€U>-<€$>QC<€$><RE>
          <€$>RL120<€$><€S>D<€U>ocument<€S>: STYPE<€$>QR<€$><RE>
          <RE>
          <RE>
          <EN><QL><RE><€$>RL120<€$><€$>TB1ST0110SM3402TB1<€$><€S>T<€U>his
               is your last chance to renew your subscription to <.$>F2<.
               $><€S>T<.U>he <€S>K<.U>entucky <.S>R<.U>egister<.$>F1<.
 
 
                                                 Appendix D:  Sample Data     34
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
               $>. <€S>I<.U>f you haven't already<RE>
          <€$>CR<€$>
          <€U>renewed, just return the form in this issue and you will con
               tinue to receive the newsletter each month,<RE>
          free of charge. <€S>O<€U>therwise, your name will be deleted fro
               m the mailing list and this issue will be the last<RE>
               one you receive.<QL><RE>
          <RE>
          <RE>
          <EN><QL><RE><€$>RL120<€$><€$>TB1ST0110SM3402TB1<€$><€S>P<€U>leas
               e supply a complete, legible mailing address to ensure delivery
               . <€S>U<.U>se a <€S>U<.U>niversity of <€S>K<€U>entucky<RE>
          <€$>CR<€$>
          <€U>campus address whenever possible, as this allows us to save
               on postage costs. <.S>W<€U>hen using a <.S>UK <.U>campus<RE>
          address, please be sure to include the <€S>S<€U>peed <€S>S<€U>or
               t <€S>C<.U>ode.<QL><RE>
          <RE>
          <RE>
          <RE>
          <RE>
          <RE>
          <RE>
          <RE>
          <€$>SM3600<€$><€$>SL120<€$><€$>F1<€$><€$>P12<€$><RE>
          <..><..><..><..><..><..><..><..><..><..><..><..><..><..><..><..>
               <..><..><..><..><..><..><..><..><..><..><..><..><..><..><..
               ><..>
          <><..><..><..><..><..><..><..><..><..><..><..><..><..><..><..>
 
 
          Sample TTSTRAN Input
 
          ¬SM2000F1P09SL110¬
             This is your last chance to renew your subscription to ¬F5¬The
          Kentucky Register¬F1¬. If you haven't already renewed,
          just return the form in this issue and you will continue
          to receive the newsletter each month, free of charge.
          Otherwise, your name will be deleted from the mailing list
          and this issue will be the last one you receive.#_
             Please supply a complete, legible mailing address to ensure delivery.
          Use a University of Kentucky campus address when possible, as this
          allows us to save on postage costs. When using a UK campus address,
          please be sure to include the Speed Sort Code.#___
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                 Appendix D:  Sample Data     35
 
 
          Guide to Typesetting at the UKCC
 
 
 
 
          Sample TTSTRAN Output
 
          ¬SM2000F1P09SL110¬  THIS IS YOUR LAST CHANCE TO RENEW YOUR SUBSCRIPTIO
          N TO ¬F5¬THE KENTUCKY REGISTER¬F1¬. IF YOU HAVEN'T ALREADY RENEWED, JU
          ST RETURN THE FORM IN THIS ISSUE AND YOU WILL CONTINUE TO RECEIVE THE
          NEWSLETTER EACH MONTH, FREE OF CHARGE. OTHERWISE, YOUR NAME WILL BE DE
          LETED FROM THE MAILING LIST AND THIS ISSUE WILL BE THE LAST ONE YOU RE
          CEIVE.#_ PLEASE SUPPLY A COMPLETE, LEGIBLE MAILING ADDRESS TO ENSURE D
          ELIVERY. USE A UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY CAMPUS ADDRESS WHEN POSSIBLE, AS
          THIS ALLOWS US TO SAVE ON POSTAGE COSTS. WHEN USING A UK CAMPUS ADDRES
          S, PLEASE BE SURE TO INCLUDE THE SPEED SORT CODE.#___
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                 Appendix D:  Sample Data     36