HISTORICAL MANUALS

 
 
          NOTICE!
 
          This is an old manual and contains much material that is
          dated.  Many of the functions of CMS are not covered and
          some details have changed.  This manual will be replaced
          by a new CMS User's Guide sometime in the future.
 
          If you have problems or questions check the online HELP
          for the latest information, use the new SUGGEST command
          to ask for more information, or talk to a consultant at
          your site.  On the Lexington campus consulting is
          available in 110 McVey Hall or call 606/257-2900 and ask
          for Consulting.
 
 
 
                                            UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
                                            COMPUTING CENTER
 
          Software Documentation            CJS User's Guide
 
                                            VM/SP 2.1
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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                                             UUU  KK   K  CCCC  CCCC
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
          Fourth Edition, Revision 0 (April 1983)
 
          This edition applies to the Conversational Job
          System using Release 2.1 of the IBM Virtual
          Machine System Product as implemented at the
          University of Kentucky Computing Center.
 
          Users of this manual are encouraged to report
          any errors or ambiguities, and to make
          suggestions for improvements.  Contact the
          authors at the address below.
 
          Technical changes made to the contents of this
          manual are indicated by a vertical bar to the
          left of the change.
 
          University of Kentucky
          Computing Center
          72 McVey Hall
          Lexington, KY  40506-0045
          Phone: 606/257-2900
 
          Processed April 18, 1983 with UW SCRIPT - Version 3.7 (11/23/81)
 
          Prepared by Dave Elbon and Nanci Unger
 
 
 
                                                                         PREFACE
 
 
             This manual  is a  general guide to  the Conversational  Job System
          (CJS)   provided  by  the University  of  Kentucky  Computing  Center.
          Detailed information  about commands described  in this manual  may be
          found in the following publications.  Note that the UKCC CJS Reference
          will reflect changes and additions made to VM/SP at the UKCC that will
          not be covered in the IBM documentation.
 
            University of Kentucky Computing Center CJS Reference
 
            IBM VM/SP: CMS Primer (Order No. SC24-5236)
 
            IBM VM/SP: CMS Command and Macro Reference (Order No. SC19-6209)
 
            IBM VM/SP: CP Command Reference for General Users
                (Order No. SC19-6211)
 
            IBM VM/SP: System Product Editor Command and Macro Reference
                (Order No. SC24-5221)
 
            IBM VM/SP: System Product Editor User's Guide (Order No. SC24-5220)
 
            IBM VM/SP: EXEC 2 Reference (Order No. SC24-5219)
 
            IBM VM/SP: SP Editor Command Language Reference Summary
                (XEDIT Reference Card, Order No. SX24-5122)
 
            IBM VM/SP: EXEC 2 Language Reference Summary
                (EXEC 2 Reference Card, Order No. SX24-5124)
 
            Waterloo SCRIPT Reference Manual
 
          The following manuals  contain more information which may  be of value
          to CJS users:
 
            IBM VM/SP: Introduction (Order No. SC19-6200)
 
            IBM VM/SP: System Messages and Codes (Order No. SC19-6204)
 
            IBM VM/SP: Terminal User's Guide (Order No. SC19-6206)
 
            IBM VM/SP: CMS User's Guide (Order No. SC19-6210)
 
            Waterloo SCRIPT User's Guide
 
            UKCC Plotting Manual
 
 
 
                                                                   Preface     i
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
                                                                        CONTENTS
 
 
          Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  i
 
          Section 1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  1
 
             1.A What is CJS? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  1
 
             1.B What is Virtual? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
 
             1.C CJS Charges  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
 
          Section 2.  The Terminal  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
 
             2.A Types of Terminals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
 
             2.B Connecting a 3270-Type Terminal  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7
 
             2.C Connecting an ASCII Terminal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7
 
             2.D Logging On . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
 
             2.E Logging Off  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
 
             2.F Failures, Disconnecting, and Reconnecting  . . . . . . . . . 12
 
          Section 3.  Using Your Terminal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
 
             3.A The Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
 
             3.B Terminal Modes and Commands  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
 
             3.C Retrieving and Reissuing Command Lines . . . . . . . . . . . 14
 
             3.D Editing Command Lines  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
 
             3.E 3270 Status Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
 
             3.F Halting Execution and Terminal Output  . . . . . . . . . . . 18
 
             3.G Terminal Line Size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
 
             3.H Console Spooling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
 
          Section 4.  The CMS File System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
 
             4.A Naming CMS Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
 
             4.B Creating CMS Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
 
                                                                 Contents     ii
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
             4.C Erasing CMS Files  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
 
             4.D Examining and Modifying CMS Disk Files . . . . . . . . . . . 22
 
             4.E Other CMS Disk Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
 
             4.F Making Efficient Use of CMS Disk Space . . . . . . . . . . . 24
 
             4.G When Your Disk is Full . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
 
             4.H Sharing Files with Other Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
 
          Section 5.  Editing CMS Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
 
             5.A Editing  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
 
             5.B XEDIT  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
 
                Basic XEDIT Subcommands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
 
                Targets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
 
                Column Subcommands  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
 
                Spelling Aids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
 
                Leaving XEDIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
 
                Other XEDIT Features  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
 
                XEDIT From A 3270-Type Terminal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
 
                XEDIT From An ASCII Terminal  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
 
          Section 6.  Printed Output  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
 
          Section 7.  Communicating with Other CJS Users  . . . . . . . . . . 53
 
          Section 8.  OS Batch Jobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
 
             8.A Submitting a Job . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
 
             8.B Job Status Messages  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
 
             8.C Canceling a Job  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
 
             8.D Examining Your Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
 
             8.E Claiming Your Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
 
             8.F Jobs From Card Readers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
 
             8.G Sending Messages to Other Users  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
 
 
                                                                Contents     iii
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
             8.H Checking OS JCL Under CMS  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
 
             8.I Using OS Data Sets from CMS  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
 
          Section 9.  Writing EXECs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
 
          Section 10.  Other Features of CJS  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
 
             10.A Suggestions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
 
             10.B Online Kentucky Register  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
 
             10.C Plotting  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
 
             10.D Backing Up Your Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
 
             10.E The PUBLIC Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
 
             10.F Punching a Real Card Deck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
 
             10.G Reading a Real Card Deck  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
 
          Appendix A.  The Terminal Environments  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
 
          Appendix B.  A Sample Terminal Session  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
 
          Appendix C.  3270 Program Function Key Template . . . . . . . . . . 84
 
          Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                                 Contents     iv
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          Section 1:  Introduction
 
 
 
 
          1.A What is CJS?
 
             CJS,  which  stands for Conversational  Job System,  is  a computer
          system  that  allows you  to  perform  many  useful functions  from  a
          computer terminal. You can create and manage a system of files; submit
          jobs to the batch system;  receive and examine output from batch jobs;
          and use SCRIPT, the Waterloo text processor, to format documents.   We
          could get really  technical here and tell  you that CJS is  a modified
          version of CMS (the Conversational Monitor  System),  which is part of
          IBM's VM/SP (Virtual Machine System  Product).   We could also mention
          that CJS lets you  use the interactive functions of CMS  and the batch
          processing functions of OS/MVT, the IBM 370 operating system.   But we
          want  you to  keep reading,   so we'll  just say  that CJS  is a  very
          versatile system.
 
             CJS lets you  access all of the  facilities (utilities,  languages,
          disk storage, tape storage)  of the UKCC batch system from a terminal.
          You'll find  the term "batch  system" used  often in this  manual.   A
          batch  computing system  takes  all of  your commands  at  once (in  a
          batch),  processes  them,  and gives you  a response later.    This is
          different from an interactive computing system,  which lets you give a
          command,   get a  response,  give  another command,   and get  another
          response immediately.   If you already use  the UKCC batch system with
          punched  cards,  the  transition to  CJS  should be  easy.   CJS  will
          eliminate card handling, card expenses,  unneeded printed output,  and
          trips to the Computing Center.
 
             To use CJS,  you  will need a userid;  this is  a unique identifier
          used by  VM/SP to  distinguish you and  your data  from all  other CJS
          users and  their data.    CJS userids  are assigned  by the  Computing
          Center and  generally consist  of three  letters,  which  identify the
          user's university department, and three digits,  which create a unique
          identifier.  You must have a userid to log on (connect) to the system.
          This may seem obvious, but we'll say it anyway: you do not have to log
          on to  the same  terminal every time,   and you cannot  log on  to two
          terminals at the same time using the same userid.
 
             After you log on,   you can use CJS to create,   change,  and erase
          files.   A file is a collection of records (units of data) stored on a
          disk.   Three kinds of files are  used with CJS:  "spool files," which
          are temporary,  "CMS  disk files," which are permanent,   and "OS disk
          data sets," which are used in conjunction with OS batch jobs.
 
                                                  Section 1:  Introduction     1
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
             If you're now trying  to understand why we use the  word "spool" to
          describe a  file,  don't  bother;  the  term's origins  are rooted  in
          computerese of  days gone  by.   Just  remember that  spool files  are
          temporary files.   They are stored by  the system in a special storage
          area on a disk and may represent  printed output or a card deck.   You
          can use spool files for temporary storage or to transfer data from one
          user to another, but not for permanent storage of data.
 
             Once a spool file has been created, it cannot be changed. It can be
          examined with  the RBROWSE  or PEEK commands,   sent to  another user,
          copied to  a permanent CMS  disk file,   or erased,  but  its contents
          cannot be changed.   (When a spool file  is copied to a CMS disk file,
          it becomes a permanent file that can be changed; more on this later.)
 
             Spool  files can  be routed  (sent)   to your  userid and  accessed
          through your "reader," a temporary place on  a disk where files can be
          kept until you decide what you want to do with them.   Your reader can
          receive up  to 10,000 lines  of output  per job.   Reader  spool files
          remain available for one week;  they  are then removed from the system
          to prevent the spool disk space from filling.
 
             You can use the spool mechanism  to submit jobs and receive output.
          The SUBMIT  command will send  the contents  of one or  more permanent
          (CMS disk)  files to the batch system.   The output,  both printed and
          punched, can then be sent back to your terminal as a temporary (spool)
          file.    You can  copy  the temporary  file to  a  permanent file  for
          examination and storage by using the ACCEPT command, and you can print
          the file by using the OUTPUT command.  You can also change the file by
          using XEDIT, the online editor.
 
             The permanent area of disk space rented  by each CJS user is called
          a minidisk.  Your minidisk is assigned to your userid.  Data stored on
          a minidisk is kept in CMS disk files, the permanent files we mentioned
          earlier.  Minidisk space is allocated by the Computing Center in units
          called "cylinders."   Each cylinder  contains about  200,000 bytes  of
          data.   To give you an idea of what this means,  the text on this page
          requires approximately 3,800 bytes of disk space.
 
             User minidisk space  is saved on magnetic tape once  every two days
          by the Computing Center,   to allow recovery of user files  in case of
          hardware error.    Files lost because of  user error will  be restored
          (when possible)  at the user's expense.    You should provide your own
          backup for important data; see the section on backup in this manual.
 
             CJS users  are charged  for the resources  they use.    Charges are
          divided into two categories:  disk space rental and terminal sessions.
          See the  write-up on  "CJS Charges"  at the  end of  this section  for
          details.   If you  cannot log on because  your account has run  out of
          money,  contact the Computing Center to have money added.   Be sure to
          specify that the account is used for CJS (it also helps if you tell us
          which userids are affected).   Most likely you will not be able to log
          on until  the next day,  after  the account is reactivated.    You can
          avoid this delay  by increasing your allocation before  your funds run
          out.
 
                                                  Section 1:  Introduction     2
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
             This manual  provides basic  information about  CJS.  The  UKCC CJS
          Reference contains detailed information on most of the commands needed
          by CJS users, including locally written and modified commands.   Other
          helpful manuals are listed in the Preface.  Detailed documentation for
          all commands and error messages may be obtained at a terminal with the
          HELP command.
 
 
          1.B What is Virtual?
 
             You will  often find the  word "virtual"  used in relation  to CJS.
          The dictionary defines virtual as "being  in essence or effect but not
          in fact."  Using CJS is like having your own personal computer,  so we
          say you  have a  "virtual machine."  This  virtual machine,   which is
          created by VM/SP,   simulates the functions of a  real computer.   But
          while a real computer has a system console with switches and lights, a
          virtual machine has a terminal and command languages.
 
             The two command languages available correspond  to the two parts of
          VM/SP:   CP (Control Program)  and CMS.   CP controls the resources of
          the real computing system and  manages communication among the virtual
          machines.   With CJS you  can use a subset of the  IBM CP commands,  a
          subset of the  IBM CMS commands,  and many  locally supplied commands.
          Usually there is no need to distinguish between CP and CMS commands.
 
             You also have  a number of resources  available,  including virtual
          processor storage,  a permanent disk area (the minidisk),  and several
          virtual  unit record  devices,  including  a virtual  card reader,   a
          virtual card punch,  and a virtual printer.   These virtual devices do
          not use physical input/output devices, but are simulated by VM/SP with
          spool files.
 
             Each spool file is associated with  a virtual device type (printer,
          reader,  or punch)  and a userid.   Each  file has a unique spool file
          number (from 1 to 9998) assigned by the system.  The userid associated
          with each file is called the "owner"  of the spool file,  and only the
          owner may manipulate the file.
 
             The virtual  processor storage (memory)   is similar to  the region
          used by a batch job,  although jobs do not use this space.   Each user
          has a separate virtual memory space,  which is used by CMS commands as
          a work  area to examine and  manipulate data.   This space  is created
          when you log on and is destroyed when you log off.
 
             Detailed information  about VM/SP  may be found  in the  IBM VM/SP:
          Introduction.
 
 
 
                                                  Section 1:  Introduction     3
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          1.C CJS Charges
 
             CJS charges are divided into two categories:  disk space rental and
          terminal sessions.
 
             Disk space  is allocated  in multiples  of one  cylinder and  costs
          $2.00 per cylinder per month ($4.00 for external users).   Charging is
          done on a daily basis and costs about 6.7 per cylinder per day (about
          13 for external users),  with a  $2.00 minimum monthly charge.   Disk
          rental must be charged to a  non-allocated account,  and students must
          pay for each semester in advance.
 
             Terminal session charges  are broken  down into  CPU time  and non-
          spooled Input/Output  operations (which  is almost  entirely CMS  disk
          file I/O).    CPU time  is charged at  the rate of  $750 per  CPU hour
          (about 21 per  second);  external users are charged  twice this rate.
          The CPU time  used is known as  the "virtual" CPU time,   which is the
          time used  directly by the user.    I/O operations are charged  at the
          rate of  50 per  1,000 ($1 per  1,000 for  external users).    An I/O
          operation is  required each time  a record is  read or written  from a
          disk file (for  editing,  etc.),  and each  time a command or  EXEC is
          executed.
 
             CJS terminal  sessions are charged to  accounts at the end  of each
          day (usually sometime  between midnight and 7:00  a.m.).   The account
          for terminal session billing  does not have to be the  same as the one
          used for disk rental billing, but it cannot be a deferred project.
 
             CJS users  are also charged for  batch jobs,  printed  output,  and
          spool files.   Batch  jobs submitted from CJS are charged  in the same
          way as  batch jobs submitted  on cards.    Each batch job  specifies a
          project number  (which does  not have to  be the  same as  the project
          number to which your CJS use is billed).  Printed output is charged as
          if it were output from a batch job: 50 per 1,000 lines printed at the
          Computing Center,  and 10 per 1,000 lines printed at a remote site or
          sent back to a terminal (external users pay twice this rate).  Printed
          output from CJS is charged to the account used for terminal sessions.
 
             Charges for spool files are based on  the number of 4K spool blocks
          used by the  file and the number  of minutes the file  remains in your
          reader.  The rate is $0.00000244 per block-minute.  Spool files of the
          size currently  used (approximately 1600  lines or 2000  cards)  incur
          very small charges  if kept for 24 hours.   For  example,  a 1600-line
          print file with full  132-byte lines spooled to a CJS  user would cost
          about 14 per day.  There is no charge for files which accumulate less
          than 1 in charges, so if you remove this file within one and one-half
          hours the  cost would be  less than a penny,   and no charge  would be
          accumulated.   You should  delete your spool files when  you no longer
          need them, since the system removes them only once a week.
 
 
 
                                                  Section 1:  Introduction     4
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          Section 2:  The Terminal
 
 
 
 
          2.A Types of Terminals
 
             You will  use CJS  from some  kind of  terminal,  and  the kind  of
          terminal you use will affect the way  you use CJS.   A terminal can be
          classified in  several ways:  local  or remote,  display  or printing,
          ASCII or EBCDIC, synchronous or asynchronous.  Each brand and model of
          terminal also has its own peculiar set of features.
 
             A  local terminal  is directly  attached to  the computing  system,
          using a  local controller and  channel connection.   This  is possible
          only  at relatively  short distances  from the  Computing Center.    A
          remote terminal  is usually attached  to the computing  system through
          switched  or  leased   telephone  lines,   although  other   kinds  of
          connections are sometimes used.   Remote doesn't necessarily mean that
          the terminal  is very  far from the  Computing Center  (some terminals
          using remote connections are located in McVey Hall, only a few hundred
          feet from the computer), but a remote terminal may be located anywhere
          that access to appropriate communication facilities is available.
 
             The main  distinction between  local and  remote terminals  is that
          connecting to the computing system with most remote terminals will use
          a switched communication line and  require dialing a telephone number.
          This is  called a "dial-up"  connection.   Dial-up  connections employ
          ordinary telephone facilities to make a temporary terminal-to-computer
          connection.    Terminals  using  switched  lines  can  use  a  special
          dataphone,  a  standard telephone  with an  acoustic coupler,   or may
          connect through a modem directly to the telephone line.  Communication
          over telephone lines is limited to  relatively low speeds,  so another
          difference between  local and remote terminals  is the speed  at which
          they transmit and receive data.  In general, the higher the speed, the
          easier the terminal is to use.
 
             At the UKCC,  all local  terminals are 3270-type display terminals.
          Remote terminals  may be 3270-type  display terminals,   ASCII display
          terminals, or ASCII printing terminals.
 
             Another way to classify a terminal is the method it uses to display
          data.  Some use a display screen (usually a Cathode Ray Tube, or CRT),
          others use some  kind of printing mechanism.    Printing terminals are
          most often used when a permanent  printed record is required,  or when
          producing letters and other documents.    Display terminals are easier
 
 
                                                  Section 2:  The Terminal     5
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          to  use when  creating  and editing  files.    VM/SP provides  special
          software support  for 3270-type display  terminals (and  ASCII display
          terminals  using the  S3270  Simulator  Facility)  which  makes  these
          terminals much more convenient to use.
 
             The S3270 Facility uses software simulation in combination with the
          functions provided by  the terminal hardware to give  an ASCII display
          most of  the functions of a  3270-type display terminal.   There  is a
          connection surcharge for this service,  to pay for the system overhead
          caused by the software simulation.   No ASCII terminal can support all
          3270 functions,  and support for various brands and models must differ
          to allow for  different keyboard arrangements and  control mechanisms.
          Special keys and  combinations of keys on the  terminal's keyboard are
          used to  simulate functions available on  the keyboard of  a 3270-type
          display terminal.    The specific keys  and sequences used  vary among
          different models of  ASCII terminals,  and you  should become familiar
          with the  way they  are used  before attempting  to use  S3270.   More
          information  about S3270  can  be found  in  the  UKCC CJS  Reference.
          Unless specified otherwise,  everything in this manual that applies to
          3270-type terminals also applies to ASCII terminals using S3270.
 
             A terminal may also be classified by  the character code it uses to
          communicate with the computer system.   The two codes used at the UKCC
          are Extended Binary  Coded Decimal Interchange Code  (EBCDIC)  and the
          American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII).   The code
          used by a  terminal is usually of  no consequence to the  user because
          VM/SP automatically  handles the translation of  data to and  from the
          appropriate code.  The only EBCDIC terminals at the UKCC are 3270-type
          display terminals.  All other terminals use ASCII.   Internally, VM/SP
          uses EBCDIC to represent data.
 
             Binary synchronous (or bisync) and asynchronous (or async or start-
          stop) refer to the communication protocol used with a remote terminal.
          This distinction  is seldom important to  the terminal user.    At the
          UKCC,  bisync  protocol is used by  remote 3270-type terminals  and by
          clusters  of ASCII  terminals sharing  a  communication line.    Async
          protocol is used by all other ASCII terminals.
 
             The way that  you use your terminal will depend  on its combination
          of attributes.    The initial connection  procedure that you  will use
          depends on  whether you  are using  a 3270-type  terminal or  an ASCII
          terminal.    Once you  have connected  to the  system,  the  important
          distinction is  between those terminals  treated by VM/SP  as displays
          (3270-type  terminals and  ASCII  terminals  using S3270)   and  those
          treated as printing (all others,  even  if the terminal actually has a
          display screen).
 
             Public  terminals are  available  at several  locations  on the  UK
          campus.   There  are 3270-type  display terminals  available in  McVey
          Hall,  and  ASCII terminals  are available in  McVey Hall  and several
          other locations.    The locations  and operating  hours of  the public
          terminal areas  are published periodically  in the  Kentucky Register,
          the Computing Center's monthly newsletter.
 
 
                                                  Section 2:  The Terminal     6
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
             A microcomputer can be used as an asynchronous ASCII terminal if it
          has the appropriate hardware and software.   With the proper software,
          it is also possible to exchange  files with microcomputers.   Refer to
          the UKCC CJS Reference for more information.
 
 
          2.B Connecting a 3270-Type Terminal
 
             Connecting to  the VM/SP  system with a  local or  remote 3270-type
          terminal is very simple.  Use this procedure:
 
           1.  Turn on the terminal if it is not already on.   Generally this is
               done by  pulling out on  a knob at the  lower left corner  of the
               display.  The terminal will require about a minute to warm up.
 
           2.  The display should have "VM/370 ONLINE" in the upper left corner,
               "RUNNING UKCC" in the lower right corner,  and the VM/370 logo in
               the center of the screen.  The cursor should be in the lower left
               and the SYSTEM AVAILABLE indicator should  be on.   If the screen
               is blank, press the CLEAR key.   If the screen is still blank, or
               if  someone  else  is  logged  on   and  has  left  the  terminal
               unattended, turn off the terminal,  wait a few seconds,  and turn
               it on  again.   Press the CLEAR  key when the terminal  warms up.
               The VM/370 logo should now be  displayed and the SYSTEM AVAILABLE
               indicator should be on.   If the screen is still blank,  get help
               from a consultant or an operator.
 
           3.  Once the logo is displayed, press the CLEAR key.  The screen will
               be cleared,  the message "CP READ  UKCC" will be displayed in the
               lower right,   and the cursor will  be in the lower  left.   This
               indicates that the VM/SP Control Program (CP)  is ready to accept
               commands.  You may now log on.
 
 
          2.C Connecting an ASCII Terminal
 
             The following  procedure is  for users in  Lexington.   If  you are
          connecting  through   the  Kentucky   Educational  Computing   Network
          (KECNET),  you will use a different  procedure and should contact your
          local consultant for  details.   There is no  standard ASCII terminal,
          and models  produced by  different manufacturers  will differ  in some
          details.   The following  general procedure will work  with most ASCII
          terminals:
 
 
                                                  Section 2:  The Terminal     7
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
           1.  The terminal must  be set to half-duplex,  seven  data bits,  and
               even parity (VM/SP  will accept either even or  mark parity,  but
               transmits only even parity).  The following combinations of speed
               and stop bits are accepted:
 
                    Line Speed   Stop
                      (Baud)     Bits
                        110       2
                        300       1
                       1200       1
 
               The method used to set these attributes  will depend on the model
               of the terminal that you are  using.   Public terminals on the UK
               campus should already be set correctly.
 
           2.  If it is  not already off,  turn  off your terminal,  wait  a few
               seconds,  and  turn it on  again.   If you  are using a  modem or
               coupler, turn it on also.
 
           3.  If you  are using  a terminal in  one of the  clusters on  the UK
               campus,  skip this step.   If you  are using a switched (dial-up)
               connection, you will need to dial one of the following numbers:
 
                    Off-Campus    On-Campus
                     257-3361      7-3361   (up to 300 baud)
                     257-4861      7-4861   (up to 1200 baud)
 
               If you are  using an acoustic  coupler,  wait for  a high-pitched
               tone.   If the number is busy or there is no answer,  hang up and
               try again.    When you hear the  tone,  place the handset  of the
               telephone face-down  in the  coupler.   Note  the end  designated
               "CORD".
 
           4.  You now have a connection to the UKCC port selector.  To identify
               yourself, you must type:
 
                    rs
 
               within about 15 seconds of  establishing the connection.   If you
               wait longer than  15 seconds,  try again after  about 45 seconds.
               The system should respond:
 
                    Request:
 
               If you get no response, reestablish the connection and try again.
               If you are unable to make a connection, call the Computing Center
               for assistance.
 
           5.  You are now communicating with the  port selector and may request
               a service.  Type:
 
                    cjs
 
               and press the RETURN key.  VM/SP should respond:
 
                                                  Section 2:  The Terminal     8
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
                    VM/370 ONLINE
 
               This message  may not  be transmitted  correctly  every time  you
               connect,  and occasionally  you will only receive  a few carriage
               returns and line feeds.
 
               If the  connection  cannot  be made  immediately,   you  will  be
               informed.   You have two chances  to correctly request a service.
               If your  second attempt fails,  the  port selector will  drop the
               connection  to  your terminal  and  you  must  return to  step  2
               (above).
 
           6.  Press the attention key on the terminal (usually labeled BREAK or
               ATTN).    The  system should  respond  with  a "!"  (to  indicate
               attention) and a ".".  The "." is a prompt from the VM/SP Control
               Program (CP) indicating that a command may now be entered.
 
           7.  If you are not using an ASCII display terminal,  or if you do not
               want to use the S3270 facility,  you  are now ready to log on and
               should skip the following steps.   S3270 will use various special
               keys  or combinations  of  keys on  your  terminal's keyboard  to
               simulate  functions available  on  the  keyboard of  a  3270-type
               display terminal.   Before attempting to use S3270, you should be
               familiar with its operation.  To access S3270, type:
 
                    dial s3270
 
               and press RETURN.  You should receive the following messages:
 
                    CONNECTED TO S3270 nnn
                    ENTER YOUR TERMINAL TYPE OR "?":
 
               If you receive  other messages,   call the  Computing Center  for
               assistance.   S3270  supports several  kinds of  terminals,  each
               identified by a number.  If you know the correct number, enter it
               and press RETURN.    Otherwise,  enter a question  mark and press
               RETURN to  see a list  of valid  terminal types.   When  you have
               entered  your terminal  type,   your  terminal's screen  will  be
               cleared and  the VM/370 logo will  be displayed.   If  the screen
               appears  garbled you  have probably  entered  the wrong  terminal
               type,  and you should immediately enter #### and press the RETURN
               key.  If you need further assistance, contact a UKCC consultant.
 
           8.  When the VM/370 logo has been displayed,  press the CLEAR key (or
               the  key or  keys used  to simulate  the CLEAR  function on  your
               terminal).    The  screen  should be  cleared,   "CP  READ  UKCC"
               displayed in the lower right corner of the screen, and the cursor
               moved to the lower left.   This  indicates that the VM/SP Control
               Program (CP) is ready to accept commands.  You may now log on.
 
             If you have  persistent difficulty connecting,  please  contact the
          Computing Center  to report the problem.    You may have  discovered a
          system  problem that  will affect  other  users also.    The sooner  a
          problem is reported, the sooner it can be fixed.
 
                                                  Section 2:  The Terminal     9
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          2.D Logging On
 
             Now that you  have established a connection to VM/SP,   you can log
          on.   Your userid may be logged on at only one terminal at a time, and
          a terminal may be  used by only one userid at a  time.   Use the LOGON
          command to  identify yourself to VM/SP  and begin a  terminal session.
          Type:
 
               logon userid
 
          (where  "userid" is  your user  identifier assigned  by the  Computing
          Center) and press ENTER or RETURN.  VM/SP will respond with:
 
               ENTER PASSWORD:
 
          and,  depending on the type of  terminal,  will either type a security
          mask to conceal the password or  inhibit the display of the characters
          as they are  typed.   Every userid has an associated  password that is
          selected by  the user and  set by  the Computing Center.    You should
          protect your  password to prevent  unauthorized access to  your userid
          and data.  Type your password and press ENTER or RETURN.
 
             If you make a mistake during the LOGON process,  you must enter the
          LOGON  command  again.    For  example,   if  you  type  the  password
          incorrectly, you will receive the following message:
 
               DMKLOGO50E PASSWORD INCORRECT - REINITIATE LOGON PROCEDURE
 
          Once the log on sequence has  been correctly completed,  the following
          will be displayed:
 
               LOGON AT hh:mm:ss timezone day mm/dd/yy
               CMS/CJS SP200    PRESS ENTER OR RETURN
 
          These messages indicate the current date and time,  and the version of
          the software being used.   Press the ENTER or RETURN key, and CMS will
          respond with:
 
               R;  $0.05 hh:mm:ss
 
          This is  the CMS ready  message.   It indicates  the cost of  the last
          command (in this case,  the cost of logging on)  and the current time.
          The ready message indicates that CMS is ready to accept commands.
 
             There are other messages that may be produced while you are logging
          on.  A message like this:
 
               FILES: 001 RDR,  NO PRT,  NO PUN
 
          indicates  that you  have a  reader  spool file  waiting.   These  are
          temporary files that are used to  exchange data with other users,  and
          to hold output from batch jobs.    (These topics are covered elsewhere
          in this manual.)
 
                                                 Section 2:  The Terminal     10
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
             You will occasionally see messages like this when you log on:
 
               LOGMSG - hh:mm:ss timezone day mm/dd/yy
               * mm/dd/yy MAN BYTES TERMINAL...ENTER "NEWS" FOR DETAILS...
 
          This  is called  a "log  message" and  is used  to inform  you of  new
          versions of  software,  changes in  the UKCC operating  schedule,  and
          other news.  The NEWS command will provide additional information.
 
             If you  have trouble logging on,   make sure that  you're correctly
          entering your userid and password.   Don't panic if you receive one of
          these messages:
 
               DMKLOG980E userid ACCOUNT CLOSED; LOGON NOT ALLOWED
               DMKLOG981E userid ACCOUNT BALANCE NEGATIVE; LOGON NOT ALLOWED
               DMKLOG982E userid ACCOUNT NOT ACTIVE; LOGON NOT ALLOWED
 
          This does not mean that your userid  has been deleted from the system!
          Your files are still intact, but you must contact the Computing Center
          Main Office (open from 8:00 a.m.  to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday)
          to have your userid enabled before you can log on again.
 
             Although it is  unlikely,  you could receive  the following message
          when you log on:
 
               DMKLOG116E userid xxx NOT LINKED; CP DIRECTORY IN USE
 
          This means that the system was unable to  provide a link to one of the
          minidisks that you normally use.  If you receive this message, log off
          immediately, and log on again.
 
 
          2.E Logging Off
 
             When you have finished a terminal  session,  use the LOGOFF command
          to terminate the session.  The system will respond:
 
               $n.nn (n.nn sec CPU, nn I/O op's) will be charged to nnnn-nnnnn.
               Balance for project nnnn-nnnnn is $n.nn (Allocation $n.nn).
               CONNECT=hh:mm:ss VIRTCPU=mmm:ss.nn TOTCPU=mmm:ss.nn
               LOGOFF AT hh:mm:ss timezone day mm/dd/yy
 
          LOGOFF  displays the  cost  of your  terminal  session,  your  account
          balance,  and other information.   Account balances are updated at the
          end of each day, so the balance will probably not be current.
 
             LOGOFF will also display a list of your temporary (spool) files and
          give you an opportunity to discard any  that you no longer need.   You
          are charged for these files, based on each file's size and age.  Spool
 
 
                                                 Section 2:  The Terminal     11
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          files are  not intended  to be  used for  long-term storage,   and the
          system will automatically purge any spool file more than a week old.
 
             If you are spooling your console log,  you will be asked if the log
          should be retained when you log off.  Console spooling is used to keep
          a record of  your terminal session and  is covered in detail  later in
          this manual.
 
 
          2.F Failures, Disconnecting, and Reconnecting
 
             Should a terminal or communication line failure occur,  your userid
          will be placed in a "disconnected" status for 15 minutes.  Turning the
          terminal off, or hanging up the phone when using a dial-up connection,
          will also cause you to be disconnected.    You then have 15 minutes to
          reestablish connection with the system before a forced log off occurs.
 
             You may disconnect yourself by issuing the command:
 
               disconnect
 
          This allows you to use your terminal for something else, or to move to
          another terminal.
 
             Reconnecting is accomplished with the LOGON command, just as in the
          initial log on.  The system responds:
 
               RECONNECTED AT hh:mm:ss zone weekday mm/dd/yy
 
          It will also  display any log messages  and the number of  spool files
          that you have,  as  during any log on.   Enter the  "BEGIN" command to
          resume operations.  Press ENTER or RETURN an additional time or two to
          receive the "CMS/CJS" identification message.
 
             Some terminal  characteristics are assumed  by VM/SP each  time you
          log on,  even  if you are reconnecting.     If you alter any  of these
          settings in a PROFILE  EXEC (refer to the section on  the PROFILE EXEC
          for more information),  you may want to issue the command "PROFILE" to
          reset  them.    More  serious  difficulties   can  arise  if  you  are
          disconnected while using a 3270-type terminal and then reconnect using
          an ASCII terminal.   Some CMS commands, such as BROWSE and FLIST, will
          function correctly only  on 3270-type terminals and will  fail if they
          were active  at the  time you  were disconnected.    Anytime that  you
          intend to log on using another terminal type, you should LOGOFF rather
          than DISCONNECT.
 
             You will also be disconnected if the  VM/SP system fails or is shut
          down by the  system operator.   In this case the  forced logoff occurs
          immediately,  and logging back on to the  system will be the same as a
          normal log on.
 
                                                 Section 2:  The Terminal     12
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          Section 3:  Using Your Terminal
 
 
 
 
          3.A The Keyboard
 
             While you are logged on you will  use the keyboard of your terminal
          to enter  commands and data.    The keyboard is  similar to that  of a
          typewriter,  with a  few special keys added.   When  you have finished
          typing a command you must press a  special key to signal the computer.
          On 3270-type terminals,  this key will be marked ENTER;  on most ASCII
          terminals the key  will be marked RETURN.   Some  ASCII terminals also
          have keys marked SEND or ENTER that generally should not be used.
 
             Another important  key is one  that is  used to get  the computer's
          attention.   When using  an ASCII terminal you cannot  enter a command
          until the  computer has issued a  prompt,  and in some  situations you
          will need  to use the  attention key to  request a prompt.    On ASCII
          terminals the attention key is usually  marked BREAK (it may be marked
          ATTN on some keyboards).   There are two  kinds of attention keys on a
          3270 keyboard.   One is marked PA1,  and  will put your terminal in CP
          mode (this  will be explained  later).   The  other is the  ENTER key.
          When you  are using a  3270-type terminal  (or an ASCII  terminal with
          S3270),  you will  seldom need the attention function  because you may
          enter commands without waiting for a prompt.
 
 
          3.B Terminal Modes and Commands
 
             You will be in CMS mode when  you finish the process of logging on;
          this means  that commands  that you  enter will  be processed  by CMS.
          This is the normal operating mode, and you will probably never need to
          use the other modes that are available.
 
             Commands entered while the terminal is in CMS mode are saved in the
          order that  they are  entered (this  is called  "stacking")  and  then
          executed when any currently executing command completes.   This allows
          several commands to be entered together.   CMS will pass commands that
          it does not recognize to CP for execution.  CP commands can be entered
          in CMS mode,  but CMS commands cannot be entered while the terminal is
          in CP mode.   If you stay in CMS mode,  the distinction between CP and
 
 
                                          Section 3:  Using Your Terminal     13
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          CMS  commands is  only important  if you  want  to put  a sequence  of
          commands in an EXEC  (covered in a later section),  or  if you want to
          use the HELP command to display online documentation for a command.
 
             When either a CP or a CMS command issued in CMS mode completes, CMS
          displays the CMS  ready message.   This will include  the current time
          and the cost of executing the command.   If the command encountered an
          error,  the  ready message will also  include a return code  (a number
          used to indicate the error) from the command.
 
             To leave CMS mode,  press the BREAK key twice on an ASCII terminal,
          or press  the PA1 key  once on a  3270-type terminal.   This  puts the
          terminal into CP mode.  The CMS command "CP" can also be used to enter
          the CP environment.  To return to CMS mode, enter the command "BEGIN".
          Pressing ENTER (or RETURN) twice will cause the system to identify the
          current environment:  it  will respond with either  "CP" or "CMS/CJS".
          The system cannot respond while a command is executing.
 
             The other mode that you may find  yourself in is called CMS Subset.
          CMS Subset allows only  a subset of CMS commands to  be entered and is
          used for specialized purposes.  Pressing ENTER (or RETURN) twice while
          in Subset will cause the system to respond "CMS/CJS Subset".  To leave
          this mode, enter the RETURN command (not the RETURN key!).
 
             Commands  may be  entered using  any combination  of uppercase  and
          lowercase  letters;  in  most cases,   VM/SP translates  the input  to
          uppercase.   Examples in this manual  will generally show user-entered
          lines in lowercase and system responses in uppercase.
 
 
          3.C Retrieving and Reissuing Command Lines
 
             CMS  provides special  functions  that allow  command  lines to  be
          recalled  and reused.    The ?   (recall)  function  will display  the
          previous command line.    If you are using a  3270-type terminal,  the
          command is displayed in  the input area,  where you may  modify it and
          re-enter it by pressing ENTER.   The  = (reuse)  function will reissue
          the  previous  command.    You  may follow  the  equal  sign  with  an
          additional command (including  another equal sign)  on  the same line.
          The additional command will be executed before the previous command is
          reissued.   Multiple  equal signs  on a line  will cause  the previous
          command to be repeated once for each equal sign.
 
             If you are using an IBM 3101  or a 3270-type terminal equipped with
          Program Function (PF)  keys,  you can use  a PF key to retrieve one of
          several  previously entered  lines.    First,  set  a  PF  key in  the
          following manner:
 
               set pf10 retrieve
 
 
                                          Section 3:  Using Your Terminal     14
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          Pressing the  RETRIEVE PF key  (PF10 in  our example)  will  cause the
          system to place the most recent input line in the input area, where it
          may be modified  and reused by pressing the ENTER  key.   Pressing the
          RETRIEVE PF key  again will cause the preceding line  to be retrieved.
          The system will save several input lines for retrieval.   A PF key can
          be set automatically to RETRIEVE from a  PROFILE EXEC when you log on.
          On local 3270-type display terminals  all otherwise unassigned PF keys
          are set automatically to RETRIEVE.
 
 
          3.D Editing Command Lines
 
             Correcting mistakes in a command line is  simple if you are using a
          3270-type keyboard.   If  you notice the error  before pressing ENTER,
          just use the cursor movement keys, the ERASE EOF key, the DEL key, and
          INS (insert) MODE to correct the mistake.   Pressing INS MODE will put
          the terminal in insert mode;  use the RESET key to cancel insert mode.
          Pressing the ERASE INPUT key will erase the entire command input area.
          After pressing ENTER,  you  can use a RETRIEVE PF key  to retrieve the
          line for correction.  This isn't as complicated as it seems.  The best
          way to learn to use the keyboard is to play with one for a while.
 
             The situation  is not  quite so simple  if you  are using  an ASCII
          terminal.   Although  many ASCII terminals  provide line  editing keys
          (cursor movement, backspace,  character delete,  etc.),  these are not
          supported by VM/SP unless you are  using S3270.   However,  VM/SP does
          provide  a  set of  line  editing  characters  that provide  the  same
          functions.  Each function has a default character:
 
               Symbol                       Character
               Character Delete (CHARDEL)    @
               Line End (LINEND)             #
               Line Delete (LINEDEL)          (3270)
               Line Delete  (LINEDEL)        [ (ASCII)
               Escape (ESCAPE)               "
 
          You can change the line editing characters for a terminal session with
          the CP command TERMINAL.   The CP  command QUERY TERMINAL will display
          the current settings.
 
             The character delete symbol (@)  allows the deletion of one or more
          of the previous characters entered.  The @ deletes one character per @
          entered.  For example:
 
               ABC#@@ results in AB
               ABC@D results in ABD
               A@DEF results in DEF
               ABC@@@ results in an empty line
 
 
                                          Section 3:  Using Your Terminal     15
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          If you use an ASCII terminal you may want to set your delete character
          to the BACKSPACE key, if one is available on your terminal.   This can
          be done with the command:
 
               terminal chardel <backspace>
 
          where <backspace> represents pressing the  BACKSPACE key.   If you are
          using a  3270-type terminal,   you will usually  not need  a character
          delete symbol,  since the 3270 keyboard provides hardware line editing
          facilities.    To disable  the character  delete  feature,  enter  the
          command:
 
               terminal chardel off
 
          This  will allow  the  "@" character  to  be used  as  a regular  data
          character.
 
             The line end symbol (#)  allows the keying of more than one command
          on the same line.   The # is  used to separate the line into "logical"
          lines.   CMS stacks the commands and  executes them in sequence.   For
          example:
 
               query time#query reader
 
          is executed in the same way as the entries:
 
               query time
               query reader
 
          Two # characters together or a # at  the end of a command line will be
          treated as a null (empty) line by VM/SP.
 
             The line end character has another use.  A command line that begins
          with:
 
               #cp
 
          will be  passed directly to  CP,  even if  a CMS command  is currently
          executing.   The command will be treated as  if it had been entered in
          CP mode.
 
             The line  delete symbol  ( for 3270-type  terminals,  [  for ASCII
          terminals)  deletes the entire line,  or  the logical line back to and
          including the previous line end character (#).  For example:
 
               ABC#DEF[ results in ABC
               ABC#[ results in ABC
               ABC[ results in an empty line
 
             The escape symbol (")  causes VM/SP  to consider the next character
          entered to be a data character,
 
 
                                          Section 3:  Using Your Terminal     16
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          even if it is one of the special line editing characters (@, [, ,  ",
          and #).  For example:
 
               ABC"[D] results in ABC[D]
               ""ABC"" results in "ABC"
 
 
          3.E 3270 Status Indicators
 
             Users of 3270-type  terminals have two important  status indicators
          not available  on ASCII terminals.   The  first is a cluster  of three
          indicators marked SYSTEM AVAILABLE, INSERT MODE,  and INPUT INHIBITED.
          (These indicators are only available on real 3270-type terminals,  not
          with S3270.)    Input is accepted from  the keyboard only  when SYSTEM
          AVAILABLE is on.   INSERT MODE is controlled by the INS MODE and RESET
          keys  and  is used  for  editing  input  lines,   along with  the  DEL
          (character delete)   key.   INPUT INHIBITED  means that the  system is
          working on your last command or that something is wrong.  In any case,
          keyboard entry  is not allowed.   This  often indicates that  you have
          tried to enter data  in an area of the screen where  data entry is not
          allowed (some terminals will sound an alarm  if you attempt to type in
          a protected area).   Press RESET and move  the cursor to a valid input
          area if this is the case.   If the INPUT INHIBITED condition persists,
          it may indicate a problem with your terminal or with the VM/SP system,
          and you should contact a consultant for assistance.
 
             The second important  indication is the system message  area in the
          lower right  corner of the screen.    (This is available both  on real
          3270-type terminals  and ASCII terminals  using S3270.)    The message
          area will  contain a status indicator  and the system  node identifier
          (the node will always be UKCC).  The status will be one of:
 
          RUNNING      Normal; CP and CMS commands may be entered.
 
          CP READ      CP command  is expected.   Enter  BEGIN to return  to CMS
                       mode.  CP READ is displayed before you log on.
 
          VM READ      CMS is waiting for input.
 
          NOT ACCEPTED CMS or CP was  busy when you tried to enter  a command or
                       data.  Wait a few seconds and try again.
 
          MORE...      The screen is full,  but  the system has more information
                       to  display.    Press  CLEAR  or   PA2  to  see  the  new
                       information.  Press ENTER to hold the current screen.  If
                       ENTER is not pressed within  60 seconds,  the system will
                       automatically clear the screen and continue.
 
          HOLDING      The screen is  full,  the system has  more information to
                       display, but the screen is being held.   You may hold the
 
                                          Section 3:  Using Your Terminal     17
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
                       screen by pressing ENTER in response to a MORE... prompt.
                       The system will hold the screen  if it contains a message
                       from  another user.    Press CLEAR  or PA2  to clear  the
                       screen and continue.
 
 
          3.F Halting Execution and Terminal Output
 
             You can  stop the  execution of  a CMS  command with  the HX  (halt
          execution) command.  On an ASCII terminal you must request a prompt by
          pressing the  BREAK key  before you  can enter  the HX  command.   The
          system should respond "CMS/CJS".
 
             You can  stop the terminal  output from  a command,  but  allow the
          command to continue executing, with the HT (halt typing) command.   On
          an ASCII  terminal,  you  will again use  the BREAK  key to  request a
          prompt.    On a  3270-type terminal  it may  be difficult  to enter  a
          command while the  screen is being updated,  so wait  until the screen
          fills and "MORE..." is displayed.   Then  enter the HT command.   When
          the  command completes,   the  CMS ready  message  will be  displayed.
          Before the command completes, you can start terminal output again with
          the RT  (resume typing)   command.   Any output  that would  have been
          displayed at the  terminal from the time  an HT is issued  until RT is
          issued is lost.
 
 
          3.G Terminal Line Size
 
             VM/SP assumes  that your terminal has  a capacity of  80 characters
          per line.  Any output to your terminal that exceeds 80 characters will
          be broken into additional lines.  Your terminal may allow lines longer
          or shorter  than 80  characters,  and for  some printing  and graphics
          applications you may not want lines  broken.   The CP command TERMINAL
          LINESIZE can be used to set the line length used by VM/SP:
 
               terminal linesize n
 
          where "n" is a number from 30 to 255.  To disable line length checking
          (used with the TPRINT and plotting commands), use:
 
               terminal linesize off
 
          You can  use the CP  command QUERY  TERMINAL to determine  the current
          setting.  Note that VM/SP will assume the default LINESIZE value every
          time that you log on,  even if you are reconnecting.   You may want to
          place the CP TERMINAL LINESIZE command in your PROFILE EXEC.
 
                                          Section 3:  Using Your Terminal     18
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          3.H Console Spooling
 
             A printed record of a terminal session can be obtained with console
          spooling.   This  can be particularly valuable  if you use  a terminal
          that doesn't produce printed output.   Spooling the console causes the
          system to save commands and responses in a spool (temporary)  file for
          later printing or examination.  This record is known as a console log.
          The console log will also include messages that you receive from other
          users,  even if you where disconnected when the message was sent.   To
          initiate console spooling, enter the CMS command:
 
               setcon to *
 
          To examine the console log, you can enter the command:
 
               setcon to * close
 
          A spool  file will appear in  your reader containing the  console log.
          The log can be examined with the  RBROWSE or PEEK command,  or printed
          with the OUTPUT command, just like any other spool file.
 
             If you  decide that  you don't  need a  console log,   you can  end
          console spooling and discard the log by entering the command:
 
               setcon end
 
             When you enter the LOGOFF command, it will determine if the console
          is being spooled.    If it is,  it will  ask if you want  to keep your
          console log.    Responding "NO"  will cause the  record to  be purged;
          "YES"  will  cause the  spool  file  to  be  sent to  the  destination
          specified on the SETCON command.
 
             Note  that console  log recording  is suppressed  or limited  while
          screen-oriented commands  (such as  XEDIT,  FLIST,   and BROWSE)   are
          executing on 3270-type terminals.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                          Section 3:  Using Your Terminal     19
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          Section 4:  The CMS File System
 
 
             When you use CMS, your programs, text, and other data are kept in a
          disk area called a minidisk that is reserved for your userid.   Unless
          authorized by you,   no other user has  access to this space  (more on
          this later).   Each program, document,  or other collection of data is
          kept in a  separate CMS disk file  on your minidisk.   Each  file is a
          group of lines (records) kept together in a form unique to CMS.   They
          cannot be  read or  written using  other operating  systems,  although
          there are mechanisms for transporting CMS disk files to other systems.
          CMS provides commands for creating new files, for examining,  editing,
          and printing existing files, for sending files to other users, and for
          erasing files when they are no longer needed.
 
             Regardless of  the format of  the data in  the file,  the  CMS file
          system keeps CMS files on disk in fixed-length physical blocks of 800,
          1024, 2048, or 4096 bytes.   CMS automatically performs the processing
          required to block and deblock records,  so  you will seldom need to be
          aware of this process.   The size of the physical blocks is determined
          when the minidisk is formatted; the default size is 1024 bytes.   Your
          minidisk is formatted for you when  your userid is assigned,  and most
          likely you will never need to use any other format.
 
 
          4.A Naming CMS Files
 
             When you create a CMS disk file,  you assign an identifier that you
          will use when later referring to  the file.   CMS file identifiers are
          in three parts (a filename, a filetype, and a filemode) that are known
          collectively as  a fileid.    When you  use a  CMS command  to modify,
          update,  or  otherwise reference a file,   you will specify  a fileid.
          Some CMS  commands require only that  the filename be  specified (they
          will assume  a filetype).    Very often the  filemode can  be omitted.
          Most commands require that a filename and filetype be specified.
 
             The filename and filetype can each  be from one to eight characters
          long, and may use letters, digits, $, #, -, _, +, ., and @.  (Remember
          that # and @ characters are  normally VM/SP line editing symbols,  and
          must be immediately preceded by the logical escape character " if they
          are used on  a command line.)   File identifiers  entered in lowercase
          will automatically be  translated to uppercase (unless  the fileid was
          specified on  a command  in an EXEC).    As long  as you  follow these
          rules, you may assign any filename and filetype to any file.
 
 
                                          Section 4:  The CMS File System     20
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
             Some  CMS commands  attach special  significance  to the  filetype.
          When XEDIT is used to create  a file,  various default characteristics
          for  the  file (such  as  record  length  and format,   tab  settings,
          translation to  uppercase,  truncation  column,  and  so on)   will be
          assumed based  on the filetype;  refer  to the UKCC CJS  Reference for
          details.  Some commands will only use files with a particular filetype
          (SCRIPT  will only  use  files with  a  filetype  of "SCRIPT"),   some
          commands will  assume a  filetype by default  (SUBMIT looks  for files
          with  filetypes  "JOB"  and  "JCL"),   and  some  commands  will  make
          assumptions about  the file  based on the  filetype (PRINT  and TPRINT
          assume  that  files with  a  filetype  of "LISTING"  contain  carriage
          control information).  However, nothing prevents the use of a filetype
          for files  that are not used  with the specific CMS  function normally
          associated with that filetype.
 
             The third part of the file  identifier,  the filemode,  consists of
          two characters:   the  filemode letter and the  filemode number.   The
          filemode letter  indicates the  mode letter  (A through  Z)  currently
          assigned by the ACCESS command to the minidisk on which the file is to
          reside.  When the CMS editors are used to create a file and this field
          is not specified,   the new file is  written on your A-disk  and has a
          filemode letter of  "A".   This minidisk is  automatically accessed by
          CMS when you  log on and generally  is the only minidisk  that will be
          available to you for storing files.   Some commands assume that a file
          is on  your A-disk unless you  specify otherwise;  some  commands will
          search all accessed minidisks for a file.  The filemode letter is more
          important when you are sharing files with other users.
 
             The filemode number is a number from  0 through 5 which is assigned
          to a file when it is created or renamed.   The default filemode number
          is 1.   Since these numbers have specific uses,  it is best to use the
          default  value.   (For  example,   files with  filemode  number 3  are
          automatically  erased after  they  have been  read  once.)   For  more
          information,  refer  to the description of  the RENAME command  in the
          UKCC CJS Reference.   When it is necessary to indicate a filemode in a
          command,  specify  only the letter,  and  the filemode number  will be
          assumed to be 1.   All examples in this manual will assume the default
          value.
 
 
          4.B Creating CMS Files
 
             There are  several ways  to create  CMS disk  files,  but  you will
          probably  create most  files by  manually  entering the  data at  your
          terminal keyboard.   XEDIT, the VM/SP editor command, is used for this
          purpose.   An editor is a program that allows you to create,  examine,
          and modify a file;  a later section  of this manual discusses XEDIT in
          more detail.
 
 
                                          Section 4:  The CMS File System     21
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
             Unlike many systems,   it is seldom necessary to  specify a logical
          record  length,  record  format,  or  block size  when a  CMS file  is
          created.   Most CMS files will use variable-length records, since this
          format almost always uses less disk space than fixed-length records.
 
             CMS files may also be created  by copying data from another source.
          Data can  be copied  from an OS  disk data set  with the  CMS commands
          FILEDEF and MOVEFILE.   These are discussed in the section on OS batch
          jobs.   The COPYFILE command can be used to create a new file from one
          or more existing CMS  files.   The ACCEPT command is used  to create a
          CMS disk file from a reader spool file.
 
 
          4.C Erasing CMS Files
 
             CMS disk  files can be  deleted with  the ERASE and  BURN commands.
          You can specify either a single file:
 
               erase test data
 
          or a group of files that have the same filename or filetype:
 
               erase test *
 
          This  erases all  files  with a  filename  of  "TEST",  regardless  of
          filetype.   In  both of these examples  the ERASE command  assumed the
          filemode "A".  The BURN command would be used in exactly the same way.
          Be  careful with  both of  these commands.    There is  no command  to
          recover a file that has been erased.
 
 
          4.D Examining and Modifying CMS Disk Files
 
             An existing CMS disk file can be modified with XEDIT.  COPYFILE can
          also be used to perform some simple modifications, such as translating
          characters  to uppercase  and  reordering  data columns.    The  SORTF
          command can be used to sort the records in a CMS disk file.
 
             The fileid  (filename,  filetype,   and filemode  number,  but  not
          filemode letter)   of an  existing CMS  file can  be changed  with the
          RENAME command.
 
             CMS disk  files may be  examined in  several ways,  but  most often
          XEDIT will be used.   If you are  using a 3270-type terminal,  you can
          also  use  the  BROWSE  command,   a  read-only  editor.    BROWSE  is
          particularly valuable for examining large files.
 
                                          Section 4:  The CMS File System     22
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
             The TYPE command  can be used to display  all or part of  a file at
          the terminal.   If you are using a printing terminal,  you can use the
          TPRINT command to  print a file at your terminal.    The PRINT command
          can be used to create a spool file  from a CMS disk file.   This spool
          file can then be printed on  a real printer.   Creating printed output
          is covered in a later section of this manual.
 
 
          4.E Other CMS Disk Functions
 
             Information about  currently accessed  minidisks and  files may  be
          obtained  in several  ways.   The  CMS QUERY  command can  be used  to
          display information about one or more accessed minidisks:
 
               query disk a
 
          will describe the A-disk, including the amount of space available.
 
             Information about specific files can be obtained with the LISTX and
          FLIST commands.    LISTX will list  the fileids and  other information
          about specified files.  For example, the command:
 
               listx
 
          will list the fileids of all files on your A-disk.  And the command:
 
               listx ( l
 
          will list  the fileids,   record counts,   creation dates,   and other
          information about all of the files on your A-disk.  The command:
 
               listx x* ( l
 
          will  list  information about  all  files  on  the A-disk  which  have
          filenames beginning with an "X".
 
             If you are using a 3270-type terminal, you may want to use FLIST, a
          screen-oriented command.   FLIST displays a menu of fileids, including
          a LISTX-type  description of  each file.   Other  CMS commands  may be
          entered  from  the menu,   using  the  listed fileids  as  parameters.
          Consult the UKCC CJS Reference for more information.
 
 
 
 
                                          Section 4:  The CMS File System     23
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          4.F Making Efficient Use of CMS Disk Space
 
             To most efficiently  use your available space you  should use files
          with variable-length  records as much  as possible.   This  is because
          variable-length records  are saved  on disk  with all  trailing blanks
          removed.   In many applications,  especially SCRIPT and program source
          files,  records will  often be more than 50% blanks.    Almost all CMS
          commands will accept  variable-length records (two exceptions  are the
          SYNONYM and UPDATE commands).
 
             If you have files in fixed-length format,  they may be converted to
          variable-length format with the COPYFILE command:
 
               copyfile data file a ( recfm v trunc
 
             CMS files can also be "packed"  to reduce their space requirements.
          Packing works by replacing all occurrences  of two or more blanks with
          one count  byte,  and  all occurrences of  four or  more of  any other
          character with a three-byte field.   This  can result in a substantial
          savings of disk space.   The PACK  command and the SET PACK subcommand
          of  XEDIT are  used for  this purpose.    A packed  file will  usually
          require less disk space than the same file unpacked, but the file must
          be unpacked  for most  processing.   XEDIT  is the  only command  that
          should be used to examine or modify packed files.  The command:
 
               pack program job
 
          compresses a file called PROGRAM JOB on the A-disk, and the command:
 
               unpack program job
 
          restores it to its original form.   Modifying a packed file improperly
          will make it  unreadable;  data cannot be recovered from  such a file.
          Converting a packed  file to variable-length format can  also make the
          file unreadable.
 
 
          4.G When Your Disk is Full
 
             When executing a command that writes a file to disk, it is possible
          that more disk  space will be required than is  available.   This will
          cause the  command to terminate with  an error message  indicating the
          problem.   To successfully  complete the command,  some  space must be
          made  available.   This  can be  done  by erasing  unneeded files  and
          packing existing files until enough space is available.   The SENDFILE
          command can  be used to  temporarily move some  of your files  to your
          reader.   Once they have been moved, they may be erased from your disk
          to  make more  space  available.    They can  be  moved  back to  your
 
 
                                          Section 4:  The CMS File System     24
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          permanent  minidisk with  the ACCEPT  command  later.   Remember  that
          reader spool files cannot be used for permanent data storage, and that
          spool  files more  than a  week old  are purged  automatically by  the
          system.
 
             A special case is  when XEDIT cannot SAVE or FILE  because of space
          limitations.   The  editor attempts to  write a  new copy of  the file
          being edited to  disk and then erase  the old copy.   This  is done to
          prevent loss of data if the system should fail while the file is being
          saved.   If you cannot SAVE or FILE, first erase any AUTOSAVE files on
          your disk.    These files have  a numeric  filename and a  filetype of
          "AUTOSAVE".    They  are created  by  XEDIT  to provide  a  checkpoint
          capability in case of  error.   You can also try packing  some of your
          files, or use SENDFILE to send some files to your reader.
 
             If all other methods of obtaining space have failed, it is possible
          to erase  the copy  on disk  of the   file that  you are  editing from
          within the editor with the ERASE  command and then immediately issue a
          SAVE or FILE command.  However, should the system fail before the SAVE
          or FILE completes, your file will be lost.  Use this procedure only as
          the last resort.
 
             If you find  that you need more disk space,   contact the Computing
          Center office to have your minidisk's size increased.
 
 
          4.H Sharing Files with Other Users
 
             You can use the AUTOLINK command to authorize other users to access
          your CMS disk files.  Once authorized by you, another user can use the
          LINK and ACCESS commands to gain  access to your files.   AUTOLINK can
          also be used to revoke authorizations,  examine existing authorization
          rules,  and assign another  user to act as a proxy  for you.   You can
          restrict other users  to read-only links to your  minidisk,  or permit
          write-access.
 
             CMS does not  allow write-access by more  than one user at  a time.
          If two or  more users simultaneously have write-access  to a minidisk,
          the file directory  on the minidisk will almost  certainly be damaged,
          and the files permanently lost.   This will happen even if none of the
          users intentionally modify a file on the shared disk.  Another problem
          with shared  access is that when  a user with write-access  modifies a
          file,  users with read-access will not be able to read the file unless
          they re-issue the  ACCESS command for the minidisk.   As  you can see,
          sharing files under CMS requires some care.
 
             For more information,   refer to the descriptions  of the AUTOLINK,
          LINK, and ACCESS commands in the UKCC CJS Reference.
 
 
                                          Section 4:  The CMS File System     25
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          Section 5:  Editing CMS Files
 
 
 
 
          5.A Editing
 
             You edit a file when you create, change, or examine a CMS disk file
          with an  online editing facility.   The  editor available from  CJS is
          called  XEDIT.   It  can  be  used both  as  a  full-screen editor  on
          3270-type display terminals  and as a line mode editor  on other types
          of terminals.   This is an introduction to XEDIT; more information may
          be found  in the UKCC CJS  Reference,  the IBM VM/SP:   System Product
          Editor User's Guide, the IBM VM/SP:  System Product Editor Command and
          Macro Reference,  and at a terminal from the HELP facility.   There is
          also an XEDIT reference card.
 
             XEDIT is primarily a context editor;  a specific line is located by
          the "context" of certain characters in it.  Most XEDIT commands act on
          the current line or a group of  lines beginning with the current line.
          You can move up  or down a specified number of  lines from the current
          line,  move to  the top or bottom of  a file,  and move  directly to a
          particular line.
 
             To FILE  means to write  the file you  are editing back  onto disk,
          making permanent any  changes made during the  editing session.   When
          the FILE command is issued to write  a file,  the terminal is returned
          to the CMS  environment.   You can write  a file to disk  and continue
          editing it by issuing the SAVE command.   XEDIT also has an "AUTOSAVE"
          facility  which will  cause  an  automatic SAVE  to  be  done after  a
          specified number of lines have been altered, added,  or deleted.   The
          user must  enable this  feature by issuing  the SET  AUTOSAVE command,
          described elsewhere in this section.
 
             An editing session starts when the  XEDIT command is issued and the
          editor responds,  and  ends when FILE,  CANCEL,  or QUIT  is issued to
          return to the  CMS command environment.   During an  editing session a
          copy of  the file being  edited is  in your virtual  storage;  changes
          become permanent when the file is placed on disk with the FILE or SAVE
          command.
 
 
 
 
                                            Section 5:  Editing CMS Files     26
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          5.B XEDIT
 
             XEDIT, the Virtual Machine System Product (VM/SP) Editor, is a very
          powerful  and efficient  online editor  used for  text processing  and
          program development.  Because it is both a full-screen and a line mode
          editor,   XEDIT  can  be  used  on  3270-type  display  terminals  and
          typewriter  terminals.    In   this  section  we  will   describe  the
          capabilities of XEDIT  as used on both types of  terminals,  with some
          differences noted.   Two later sections will differentiate between the
          types of  terminals in  more detail.   The  size of  an XEDIT  file is
          limited to about  156,000 characters,  which means that  the number of
          records that may be edited corresponds to approximately 2,000 cards or
          1,600 print lines.
 
             After you log on  to VM/SP and enter the CMS  environment,  you can
          enter the  edit environment and create  and change files.    Each file
          needs  its own  three-part  label,  or  fileid:    the filename,   the
          filetype, and the filemode.   The filename and filetype can each be up
          to eight  characters long and  can be  any combination of  letters and
          numbers.   The filemode is always a letter, usually "A";  you probably
          won't use the filemode as often as you will the filename and filetype.
 
             To create or edit a file,  enter  the command XEDIT followed by the
          fileid:
 
               xedit  filename  filetype
 
          and then press the ENTER key on 3270-type terminals, or the RETURN key
          on typewriter terminals.  XEDIT will search all accessed disks for the
          specified file (unless a filemode is  specified)  and,  if found,  the
          file will be read into storage for  processing.   If the file does not
          exist, a new one will be created.
 
             The XEDIT command puts you in edit  mode;  you must be in edit mode
          to enter XEDIT subcommands.   On a 3270-type terminal, subcommands are
          executed when you  type them on the  command line and press  the ENTER
          key.  On a typewriter terminal, subcommands are executed when you type
          them and press  the RETURN key.   XEDIT subcommands may  be entered in
          either uppercase or lowercase.
 
          Basic XEDIT Subcommands
 
             Once you are in edit mode,  you can use the INPUT subcommand to get
          into input mode and enter data into  a file.   To get into input mode,
          type the XEDIT subcommand:
 
               input
 
 
                                            Section 5:  Editing CMS Files     27
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          and press ENTER or RETURN.   On  a 3270-type terminal,  the input zone
          (the bottom  half of the  screen,  between  the scale and  the command
          line) will appear.  The screen changes in input mode: the prefix areas
          disappear,  the message line and status  area indicate that you are in
          input mode, and the command line says "INPUT ZONE",  to show you where
          the  input  zone  ends  and  to  remind  you  that  you  cannot  enter
          subcommands in  this mode  (see "XEDIT from  a 3270-type  Terminal" in
          this manual for more information on  the screen format).   You may now
          type in data.  To get back into edit mode, press ENTER twice.
 
             When you enter the INPUT subcommand  at a typewriter terminal,  the
          editor will respond:
 
               INPUT MODE :
 
          and you may type  in data.   Each line entered will  be written in the
          file.  Press RETURN to end a line.  When you finish entering data, you
          can return to edit mode by pressing the RETURN key on an empty line.
 
             When you leave  input mode from either type of  terminal,  the last
          line entered becomes the current line.  No line may be longer than the
          logical record length (LRECL) of a file; if you type a line containing
          more  characters than  the file's  logical record  length,  the  extra
          characters will be truncated (lopped off  and lost forever).   To find
          out  the  logical  record  length of  a  file,   enter  the  following
          subcommand in edit mode:
 
               query lrecl
 
          Truncation may also  occur at a column  before the end of  the logical
          record.  Enter:
 
               query trunc
 
          to see if this is the case.
 
             You can enter input mode at any time during an editing session; new
          lines will be inserted after the current line.  On 3270-type terminals
          the  current line  is highlighted  and appears  in the  middle of  the
          screen; on typewriter terminals the current line is generally the line
          most recently typed.   When the current line changes,  we say that the
          line pointer has moved.  The current line concept is important because
          many XEDIT subcommands (such as INPUT) begin their operations starting
          with  the  current line  and  move  the  line  pointer when  they  are
          finished.
 
             You can place data in specific columns  of a file with tabs.   On a
          3270-type terminal,   pressing the  TAB Program  Function key  (PF4 by
          default)  will move the cursor to the next tab column.   (There is one
          exception:  the  PF4 key cannot  be used  for tabbing in  power typing
          mode).  On an ASCII terminal the tab will be inserted in the file; use
          the  key marked  TAB.    Initial tab  settings  are  defined by  XEDIT
          according to filetype.  If you're editing a file and want to know what
          the tab settings are, use the QUERY TABS subcommand:
 
                                            Section 5:  Editing CMS Files     28
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
               q tabs
 
          You can  change these  settings one  or more  times during  an editing
          session with the SET TABS subcommand.  For example:
 
               set tabs 1 15
 
          The new tab settings are in effect for this editing session only.  The
          next time  you edit  the file,  you  will have to  enter the  SET TABS
          command again;  otherwise, the initial tab settings will be in effect.
          (There are  control words in the  SCRIPT text formatting  program that
          will set permanent tabs,  so if you're  using SCRIPT you may decide to
          set your tabs this way.)
 
             Let's  say  you've  created  a file  called  "newz  exports"  about
          products from New Zealand.    In the first line of the  input zone you
          type:
 
               wool
 
          You want to  type the source of  the export at tab  setting 15,  which
          you've  already set  with the  SET TABS  1  15 command  above.   At  a
          3270-type terminal,  press PF4 and the  cursor will move to column 15;
          at an ASCII terminal,  press the  TAB key.   Then type the information
          you want placed at that tab location:
 
               sheep
 
          To type the next entry,  press PF4 or  TAB and you'll be ready to type
          at column 1 on the next line.  When you've finished typing data, press
          ENTER or RETURN twice to get back into edit mode.
 
             As you create and  edit files,  you will want to  move through them
          and  examine  their  contents.    You  can  use  the  following  XEDIT
          subcommands to do this:
 
               top       move to Top-Of-File (TOF)
               bottom    move to last line before End-Of-File (EOF)
               forward   scroll forward to next screen (3270 terminals)
               backward  scroll backward to previous screen (3270 terminals)
               up        move up one line (toward the top of the file)
               down      move down one line (toward the bottom of the file)
               next      same as down
 
          More than one screen or line may be specified by typing a number after
          FORWARD, BACKWARD, UP, and DOWN.  For example:
 
               up 7
 
          moves  the  line  pointer  up seven  lines.    You  can  remember  the
          directions used by XEDIT  by thinking of the data as  being in a fixed
          position,  while the line pointer moves  up and down.   Another way to
          move the  line pointer  on a 3270-type  terminal is  by placing  a "/"
 
 
                                            Section 5:  Editing CMS Files     29
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          (diagonal) in the prefix area of a line;  this will cause that line to
          become the current line when ENTER is pressed.
 
             You can  use XEDIT subcommands  to delete,  recover,   copy,  move,
          locate,  and change lines.   Lines may be added at 3270-type terminals
          only,  by using the  ADD subcommand.   Enter "ADD n" to  add "n" lines
          after the current line (the default is  "1").   For example,  to add 7
          lines after the current line, enter:
 
               add 7
 
             Lines may be deleted from a file with the DELETE subcommand.  Enter
          "DEL n"  to delete "n"  lines beginning  with the current  line.   The
          subcommand:
 
               del 10
 
          would  delete the  current  line and  nine  lines  following it.    An
          asterisk (*) can be used to indicate that all lines to the end-of-file
          are to be deleted:
 
               del *
 
             If you find you have deleted lines that you meant to keep,  you can
          recover  them at  any  time during  an editing  session  by using  the
          RECOVER subcommand.  Enter the subcommand:
 
               recover n
 
          where "n" represents  the number of lines you want  to recover.   Note
          that recovered lines are inserted immediately before the current line;
          you'll have to move them if they were deleted from different places in
          the file.    If you wish  to recover all  lines deleted in  an editing
          session, enter:
 
               recover *
 
             Data lines may be copied and moved  within the file being edited by
          using  the  COPY  and  MOVE subcommands.    COPY  will  duplicate  the
          specified lines at a new location without changing the original source
          lines.  MOVE will delete the lines from their original location.  Both
          have the same form:
 
               COPY n destination
               MOVE n destination
 
          where  "n" represents  the  number  of lines  to  be  copied or  moved
          (beginning with the  current line),  and "destination"  represents the
          location to  which the  lines are  to be  copied or  moved (lines  are
          inserted after the destination line).   The destination operand may be
          specified as  either a number or  a character string.   The  last line
          copied or moved becomes the current line.
 
 
                                            Section 5:  Editing CMS Files     30
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
             Lines containing particular character strings may be found with the
          FIND  and  LOCATE subcommands.    FIND  accepts  one string  (with  no
          delimiters)  as an argument and searches forward,  from the line after
          the current line,   for a line beginning with the  string.   The first
          line in  which the  string is  found becomes  the current  line.   The
          FINDUP  subcommand searches  backward,  from  the  line preceding  the
          current line, for a line beginning with the string.   Again, the first
          line in which the string is found becomes the current line.
 
             The NFIND subcommand searches forward,  from the line following the
          current line,  for a line not beginning with the string.   The NFINDUP
          subcommand searches backward from the  line preceding the current line
          for a line not beginning with the string.  For both NFIND and NFINDUP,
          the first line  in which the string  is not found becomes  the current
          line.   FIND,  FINDUP,  NFIND,  and NFINDUP all begin searching at the
          first tab position, which is usually column 1.
 
             The LOCATE subcommand  also searches a file for  a specified target
          (see the  section on targets for  more information).   The  first line
          containing the target  becomes the new current line.    A diagonal (/)
          may  be substituted  for the  word  "LOCATE".   For  example,  if  the
          following subcommand was entered:
 
               /boomerang
 
          the editor would search for the string "boomerang."  If the string was
          found,  the line containing it would become the current line.   If the
          string was not found, the message:
 
               DATA NOT FOUND
 
          would be  displayed.   The  search begins after  the current  line and
          moves to the End-Of-File.   Use the SET WRAP ON subcommand to make the
          search  wraparound when  the  top  or end  of  the  file or  range  is
          encountered,  and stop at the line before the current line.   SET WRAP
          OFF is the initial setting, and will suppress wraparound.
 
             The CHANGE subcommand can be used to replace one word with another.
          Enter  the following  form  of this  subcommand  to  change the  first
          occurrence of a word in the current line:
 
               change/oldword/newword/
 
          The LOCATE (/)  subcommand described earlier may be used to locate the
          string and  make the line containing  it the current line.    Then the
          CHANGE subcommand may be entered.  If the string occurs in the current
          line, there is no need to LOCATE it.
 
             To make  a global change  (change every occurrence  of a word  in a
          file),  be sure that  the first line of the file  is the current line;
          you can do this by entering the TOP subcommand.  Then enter the CHANGE
          subcommand in the following form:
 
               change/oldword/newword/ * *
 
                                            Section 5:  Editing CMS Files     31
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          If you  want to  make a global  change starting in  the middle  of the
          file,  make current that line where you want the change to begin.   To
          change only the first occurrence of a word in each line of a file, use
          the following form of CHANGE:
 
               change/oldword/newword/ *
 
          You can abbreviate "change" to one letter.
 
             Be careful  when making  global changes;  you  may alter  words you
          didn't mean to change.   For example,  if you enter "change/see/hear/*
          *" and the word "seek" occurs in  your file,  it's going to be changed
          to "heark."   In fact,  every word  containing "see" will  be changed.
          You can  avoid this problem by  inserting spaces before and  after the
          words in a global change:
 
               change/ see / hear /* *
 
             The GET subcommand is another useful XEDIT feature.  GET allows all
          or part of one file to be inserted  into another file.   A copy of the
          file you are "getting" will be inserted  after the current line in the
          file being edited.
 
             To insert all of a file into another file, enter:
 
               get filename filetype
 
          The message  "EOF REACHED"  indicates that  the entire  file has  been
          inserted, and the last line inserted becomes the current line.
 
             To insert only part of another file  into the file you are editing,
          use the GET subcommand in the following format:
 
               get filename filetype filemode first count
 
          where "first" is the line number of the first line to be inserted, and
          "count" is the number of lines to be inserted.
 
             The PUT subcommand may  be used to store lines to  be inserted into
          another file by a subsequent GET.   You  can do this while editing the
          first file  by entering the  XEDIT subcommand  to call out  the second
          file (on  3270-type terminals,   the second  file will  appear on  the
          screen).   PUT  can then  be used to  indicate which  lines are  to be
          inserted in the first file.   PUT  stores lines in a temporary holding
          area,  starting with the current line,  up to a target (ending)  line.
          Use the following form of this subcommand:
 
               put target
 
          where  "target"  identifies the  end  of  the  group  of lines  to  be
          inserted.   The target may be specified as  a number of lines,  a line
          number,  or a character string.   If  a character string is used,  the
          editor will store all the lines,  beginning with the current line,  up
          to (but not including) the line containing the string.
 
                                            Section 5:  Editing CMS Files     32
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
             After  PUT  executes,   enter the  QUIT  subcommand  (on  3270-type
          terminals,  the first  file will reappear on the  screen).   Make sure
          that the current line is the line  after which you want the lines from
          the second file to be inserted.  Then enter the following subcommand:
 
               get
 
          No operands are necessary.   The lines stored by PUT will be inserted,
          and the last line inserted will become the new current line.
 
          Targets
 
             One of XEDIT's most versatile functions  is the ability to locate a
          line with a target.  A target is used to identify a line for XEDIT, in
          order to change which line is the  current line or to define the scope
          of a subcommand's execution.
 
             A target may be entered by itself, before any XEDIT subcommand,  or
          as the operand of some XEDIT subcommands.  A target entered alone will
          cause  the target  line to  become the  new current  line.   A  target
          entered  before an  XEDIT subcommand  will  cause the  target line  to
          become the  new current  line before the  subcommand is  executed.   A
          target entered as  the operand of an XEDIT subcommand  will define the
          scope of that  subcommand's operation.   Most XEDIT  subcommands begin
          their  operation  with  the  current line,   and  the  target  operand
          specifies where the operation is to end.
 
             A target may  be expressed as an absolute line  number,  a relative
          displacement  from  the current  line,   a  line  name,  or  a  string
          expression.   One or all of these kinds  of targets may be used during
          an editing session, and different kinds of target operands may be used
          in the same subcommand.
 
             An absolute line number is represented  by a colon (:)  followed by
          the line  number.   For example,    :12  would  cause file line  12 to
          become the current line.   Line numbers may be displayed in the prefix
          area of a 3270-type terminal with the SET NUMBER ON subcommand.
 
             A relative  displacement from  the current  line is  the number  of
          lines (either forward or backward) separating the target line from the
          current line.   This number may be preceded by a plus (+) or minus (-)
          sign, indicating a forward (+)  or backward (-)  displacement from the
          current line.    Plus (+)  is  assumed if  the sign is  omitted.   For
          example:
 
               copy 5 :12
 
          copies five  lines (starting with the  current line)  and  places them
          after line number 12.  An asterisk (*) may be used to indicate top-of-
          file (-*)  or end-of-file (+* or *).   When an asterisk is used as the
 
 
                                            Section 5:  Editing CMS Files     33
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          target operand of a subcommand,  the subcommand executes to either the
          top or end of the file.  For example:
 
               delete *
 
          deletes all lines from the current line to the end of the file.
 
             A line name may be assigned to any line in a file.  The name may be
          one to eight characters,  preceded by  a period;  for example,  .PART3
          could be a line name.  Assigning a name to a line makes it unnecessary
          to look  up its  line number or  determine its  relative displacement.
          Although the absolute line number of a  file line may change during an
          editing session,  a line name does not;  it need only be assigned once
          to remain in effect throughout that session.
 
             The SET POINT subcommand  may be used to assign a  line name.   SET
          POINT assigns a name of one to eight characters, preceded by a period,
          to the current line.  For example:
 
               set point .part3
 
          assigns  the name  .PART3  to the  current  line.    The .xxxx  prefix
          subcommand may be used on 3270-type terminals; it allows you to assign
          a name to a line by typing the  name in that line's prefix area.   The
          name may be one to four characters, preceded by a period.
 
             A target may also be specified as  one or more characters (called a
          string) contained in a file line.  The editor looks for the string and
          causes the first line containing it  to become the current line.   The
          string must  be enclosed  in delimiters;  these  may be  any non-blank
          character that does not appear in the string itself.  The diagonal (/)
          is often used for this.  For example, the following string target:
 
               /marsupial/
 
          tells the  editor to start  with the line  after the current  line and
          search for the string "marsupial",  and to make the line that contains
          it the  new current line.    A string target may  also be used  as the
          operand of a subcommand.  For example:
 
               delete/marsupial/
 
          deletes all lines  from the current line down to,   but not including,
          the line that contains "marsupial."
 
             A plus (+)   sign in front of  a string target tells  the editor to
          start at the  current line and search  in a forward direction  for the
          string.   If the string is found,   the line containing it becomes the
          new current line.   A plus is assumed if the sign is omitted,  so both
          of the following subcommands produce the same result:
 
               /marsupial/
               +/marsupial/
 
 
                                            Section 5:  Editing CMS Files     34
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          To search backward in a file, type a minus (-)  sign before the string
          target.
 
             A not (¬)  sign may precede the  string target to indicate that the
          target is  a line that  does not  contain the specified  string.   For
          example:
 
               ¬/kangaroo/
 
          causes the  editor to start with  the line following the  current line
          and search  for a line  not containing  "kangaroo."  When the  line is
          found, it becomes the new current line.   An or (|) symbol can be used
          to further define a string.  The following subcommand:
 
               locate /koala/|/bear/|/bush/
 
          will cause  the editor  to locate  the first  line (starting  with the
          current line)  in which  any one of these strings appears  and make it
          the current line.
 
             A string expression may  be associated with one or more  of the SET
          subcommand options.   SET ARBCHAR lets  you specify only the beginning
          and end  of a string while  using an arbitrary character  to represent
          all characters in the middle.   The default arbitrary character is the
          dollar sign ($).   For example,  when SET  ARBCHAR ON is in effect and
          the following command is entered:
 
               /I$Aborigine/
 
          a line containing the string "I am studying the Aborigine" will become
          the current line.
 
             SET CASE  lets you  specify whether or  not the  difference between
          uppercase and  lowercase is significant  in locating a  string target.
          If the SET CASE MIXED RESPECT subcommand is entered, it indicates that
          uppercase and  lowercase representations of alphabetic  characters are
          to be respected.  For example:
 
               /Down Under/
 
          would not  locate the string  "down under" in  a file.   The  SET CASE
          MIXED  IGNORE subcommand  tells the  editor to  ignore the  difference
          between uppercase and  lowercase.   The default is  CASE MIXED RESPECT
          for SCRIPT and MEMO files; CASE UPPER RESPECT for all other filetypes.
 
             SET SPAN  lets you specify  if a string  target is included  in one
          file line or  if it may span  a specified number of  lines.   The line
          that contains  the beginning  of the  string becomes  the new  current
          line.   If a blank separates each file line (as in SCRIPT files),  the
          following subcommand may be used to  indicate that a string target may
          span two lines, separated from each other by a blank:
 
               set span on blank 2
 
 
                                            Section 5:  Editing CMS Files     35
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          SET SPAN OFF  requires that a string  be contained in one  line.   SET
          SPAN OFF BLANK 2 is the initial setting.
 
             SET VARBLANK  lets you control whether  or not the number  of blank
          characters between two  characters is significant in  a target search.
          SET VARBLANK ON tells the editor that the number of blanks between two
          words can vary,  so the number of  blanks specified in a string target
          need not be equal to the number in the file.  For example:
 
               /the sheep/
 
          would locate either of the following lines in the file:
 
               the       sheep
               the sheep
 
          SET VARBLANK OFF is the initial setting,  and requires that the number
          of blanks between words match.
 
             Refer to the UKCC CJS Reference  and the IBM VM/SP:  System Product
          Editor Command  and Macro  Reference for more  information on  the SET
          subcommand options.
 
          Column Subcommands
 
             XEDIT also makes use of a column pointer and column targets,  which
          are similar  in some respects  to the  current line and  line targets.
          Column pointer  movement is controlled  and used  by a set  of special
          column-oriented  subcommands.   On  a  3270-type  terminal the  column
          pointer position is  indicated in the header line and  the scale line.
          On  typewriter terminals  the  column pointer  position  is marked  by
          underscoring.    Column targets  may be  absolute  or relative  column
          numbers, or string expressions.
 
             The CLOCATE  subcommand can be used  to move the column  pointer to
          the column where  you want to insert,  delete,   or change characters.
          CLOCATE searches  a file  (starting at the  column pointer  within the
          current line) for a specified character string.  This subcommand takes
          the following form:
 
               clocate/string/
 
          The character string must be enclosed in delimiters,  which may be any
          non-blank character that  does not appear in the  string (the diagonal
          is used  in the above  example).   If the  string is found,   the line
          containing it becomes the new current line,  and the column pointer is
          placed under the first character of the string.
 
             The column  pointer may be  reset to the  beginning of the  line by
          entering the following subcommand:
 
 
                                            Section 5:  Editing CMS Files     36
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
               cfirst
 
             Use the  CINSERT subcommand to insert  characters in a  line.   The
          text typed  in the  operand of  CINSERT will  be inserted  immediately
          before the column  pointer.   For example,  if your  file contains the
          line "the book is long", and you want to insert the string "200 pages"
          before the word "long", you would move the column pointer to the first
          character   in    "long"   by   entering   the    CLOCATE   subcommand
          (clocate/long/).  After the line is displayed, you can enter:
 
               cinsert 200 pages
 
          and the string will be inserted.   Press  the space bar once after the
          word "pages"  so that a blank  will separate "pages" and  "long."  The
          new line will read "the book is 200 pages long."
 
             Use the  CDELETE subcommand to delete  one or more  characters from
          the current line (starting at the column pointer).  For example:
 
               cdelete 10
 
          deletes ten characters,  starting at the column pointer.   A character
          string column  target can  also be used  with the  CDELETE subcommand.
          For example:
 
               cdelete/string/
 
          deletes characters from  the column pointer to the  first character of
          the string.
 
             Use the CAPPEND subcommand  to add words to the end  of the current
          line.  Enter:
 
               cappend text
 
          where "text" represents the data to be added to the end of the line.
 
          Spelling Aids
 
             After you've  finished entering text and  editing a file,   you can
          check for  spelling errors  with any  of three  online spelling  aids:
          SPELLFIX, SPELL, and SPELLCHK.   These commands use a built-in list of
          words called a lexicon.   You can  also create your own lexicons;  see
          the UKCC CJS Reference for details.
 
             SPELLFIX will search a CMS disk file for misspelled words, and then
          edit the file (using XEDIT)   with possible misspellings indicated for
          correction.   SPELLFIX also  will flag words that occur  twice with no
          intervening word.   Currently  SPELLFIX can only be  used on 3270-type
          display terminals with PF keys.  Enter the command:
 
 
                                            Section 5:  Editing CMS Files     37
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
               spellfix  filename  filetype  filemode
 
          The default  filetype is  "SCRIPT" and  the default  filemode is  "*".
          SPELLFIX will  invoke XEDIT and indicate  the first possible  error by
          placing the  cursor under the word  and highlighting the  entire line.
          You can change the word if it is incorrect.  Press ENTER to proceed to
          the next possibly misspelled word.   SPELLFIX  also can be issued from
          XEDIT as  a subcommand while  you are  editing a file.    One warning:
          SPELLFIX will not work  correctly if you add or delete  lines while it
          is operating.
 
             SPELLFIX allows  you to  move through the  file,  stopping  at each
          misspelled word.   You  then have several options:    you can indicate
          that the word is to be accepted as  it is,  accept the word and add it
          to your  USER LEXICON file,   replace the word with  one of a  list of
          alternative spellings, or manually retype the word.   Two lines at the
          bottom of the screen describe use of the PF keys in SPELLFIX.   Either
          PF3 or  PF15 can  always be used  to stop  SPELLFIX and  resume normal
          editing.    For  more  information,  enter  "HELP  SPELLFIX"  at  your
          terminal.
 
             The SPELL command  helps if you are unsure of  the correct spelling
          of a  word.   SPELL checks  one or  more words entered  as parameters.
          Enter:
 
               spell words
 
          where "words" are  the words to be checked.   SPELL  will display each
          word on the terminal, indicating "correct" or "incorrect."
 
             SPELL may be used as a CMS  command or an XEDIT subcommand.   SPELL
          also may be  executed from a PF  key under XEDIT.   For  example,  the
          XEDIT subcommand:
 
               set  pf2  spell
 
          would set PF2 to issue the SPELL  subcommand.   You can place "SET PF2
          SPELL" in your PROFILE XEDIT file.   To use this key,  move the cursor
          to the first letter  of a word on the screen and  then press the SPELL
          PF key  (PF2 in  our example).   The  word you  have selected  will be
          checked, and "correct" or "incorrect" will be displayed on the message
          line.    Pressing  the same  PF  key  again  will  display a  list  of
          alternative  spellings  for the  word.    Pressing  it one  more  time
          replaces the misspelled word with  an alternative spelling.   For more
          information, enter "HELP SPELL" at your terminal.
 
             SPELLCHK can search  for misspelled words in CMS disk  files and in
          lines  entered  directly  from  a  terminal.    Words  are  considered
          misspelled if they do  not appear in the command's main  lexicon or in
          one  of  the  optional  user  lexicons.    SPELLCHK  has  options  for
          specifying such  things as  how case  affects the  search for  a word;
          checking  for word  "stutters" (consecutive  occurrences  of a  word);
          generating alternative spellings for  a word;  controlling recognition
 
 
                                            Section 5:  Editing CMS Files     38
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          of  slang  words;   generating   statistics  at  command  termination;
          appending user lexicons to the main lexicon; output routing (terminal,
          console stack,  or CMS disk file);  range of records to be examined in
          CMS files; allowing numerals (0-9) in words.  Enter "HELP SPELLCHK" at
          your terminal for more information.
 
          Leaving XEDIT
 
             When you  have finished editing  a file,   you can end  the editing
          session with a  FILE or QUIT subcommand.   Use the  FILE subcommand to
          permanently store (write to disk)  a  file.   (See the section "When a
          Disk is Full" for instructions on what to do when you want to FILE but
          your disk is full.)   Use the  QUIT subcommand to prevent changes made
          to an old file  from being written to disk (this  leaves the permanent
          copy of the file intact),  or to prevent a new file from being written
          to disk.   QUIT is used when you merely examine, but do not change,  a
          file, or if you decide not to keep the changes you have made.
 
             If you enter "QUIT" and the file is new or has been changed,  XEDIT
          will warn you with the following message:
 
               FILE HAS BEEN CHANGED.  USE QQUIT TO QUIT ANYWAY.
 
          If you  still do  not want  to save  the file,   enter "QQUIT"  on the
          command line.   If you mistakenly entered  "QUIT" the first time,  you
          can now enter "FILE" and save your changes.
 
             The SAVE subcommand may  be used to write the current  file to disk
          and continue  editing.   Any  changes made to  a file  up to  the time
          "SAVE" was entered will be permanent.   This can be done automatically
          with  the XEDIT  autosave facility,   which  issues a  "SAVE" after  a
          specified number  of lines  have been  altered.   Enter  the following
          subcommand:
 
               set autosave n
 
          where "n" specifies the number of  alterations (25 is generally a good
          choice).   This will  keep you from losing your changes  if the system
          malfunctions.   It's best to issue this command at the beginning of an
          editing session.
 
             The XEDIT  autosave facility  writes the  file to  disk with  a new
          fileid;  the filename is a number, and the filetype is AUTOSAVE (e.g.,
          1 AUTOSAVE A1).   If a system failure interrupts your editing session,
          when you log on  again the autosave file will contain  the most recent
          copy of  the file.   You  can edit the file  to see which  changes are
          present, and replace the original file with the autosave file by using
          the CMS commands ERASE and RENAME.  For example, if your autosave file
          is "1 AUTOSAVE A1" and the original file is "AUSTRALIA SCRIPT A1", you
          can use  the following commands to  erase the original and  rename the
          autosave file:
 
                                            Section 5:  Editing CMS Files     39
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
               erase australia script
               rename 1 autosave a1 australia script a1
 
          or you can erase the autosave file if it is not needed.  Use the XEDIT
          command to resume editing.   Note that  if you issue a QUIT subcommand
          the original file is not altered, but the autosave file is left on the
          disk.
 
          Other XEDIT Features
 
             XEDIT  can directly  manipulate files  that are  in packed  format.
          Packed files  are kept  on disk  in a  special compressed  format that
          requires less disk space than files  in normal format.   Files in this
          format may be created by using the CMS command PACK,  or with XEDIT by
          specifying SET PACK ON or SET RECFM  VP or FP.   Files can be restored
          to normal form with the CMS command UNPACK or with XEDIT.  Once a file
          has been packed,  it  can no longer be processed by  most CMS commands
          (such as SCRIPT, PRINT, etc.).   Only XEDIT should be used to modify a
          packed file.   Modifying  a packed file in  any other way may  make it
          impossible to unpack the file or recover the data.
 
             XEDIT will set  default attributes for a file  when editing begins.
          These attributes include  record format,  maximum record  length,  tab
          stops,  translation to uppercase,  and so on.   The default attributes
          are associated with a particular  filetype.   The appendix on filetype
          attributes in the  UKCC CJS Reference lists  the attributes associated
          with each filetype.
 
             When the XEDIT command (or subcommand) is entered,  a special XEDIT
          macro will be searched for,  and executed if found.   The default name
          of the macro is "PROFILE",  although an alternate name may be supplied
          as an option.   The  filetype must always be "XEDIT" (this  is true of
          all  XEDIT macros).    The profile  macro may  contain EXEC 2  control
          statements, CP commands, CMS commands and EXECs, and XEDIT subcommands
          and macros.   These statements and commands  can be used to tailor the
          XEDIT environment to your needs.   For example, the file format may be
          set, the PF keys on 3270-type terminals may be set, and so on.  A very
          simple profile might look like this:
 
               &TRACE OFF
               LOAD &ARGSTRING
               &IF &RC NE 0 &EXIT &RC
               SET AUTOSAVE 25
               SET CASE MIXED IGNORE
 
          Your profile should begin with a  LOAD subcommand and an &IF statement
          to check its return code.  This prevents the profile from executing in
          case  of an  error.    The other  subcommands  in  the example  enable
          automatic file saving after 25 changes (AUTOSAVE 25),  and allow mixed
          uppercase and lowercase characters in every file (CASE MIXED).  A more
          elaborate example can be found in the UKCC CJS Reference.
 
                                            Section 5:  Editing CMS Files     40
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
             More  documentation  for  XEDIT  is   available  in  the  UKCC  CJS
          Reference,   including a  complete  explanation of  all  of the  XEDIT
          subcommands.  An XEDIT reference card is also available.  Refer to the
          IBM VM/SP:  System Product Editor Reference  and User's Guide for more
          information.
 
             The CMS HELP facility can also  provide information about XEDIT and
          its subcommands.  Enter:
 
               help xedit                or
               help xedit menu           or
               help xedit <subcommand>   from CJS, or
               help menu                 or
               help <subcommand>         from XEDIT.
 
             Additional information on using XEDIT  from 3270-type terminals and
          from ASCII terminals may be found in the following sections.
 
          XEDIT From A 3270-Type Terminal
 
             After you enter the XEDIT command from a 3270-type terminal,  XEDIT
          will display a screen in the following format:
 
          +-----------------------------------------------------+
          | fn ft fm  V 80  TRUNC=n SIZE=n LINE=n COLUMN=n      |<--File Id Line
          |                                                     |<--Message Line
          |===== * * * TOP OF FILE * * *                        |
          |=====                                                |
          |=====                                                |
          |=====                                                |<--Current Line
          |      |...+....1....+....2... ... ...6....+....7..>  |<--Scale
          |=====                                                |
          |=====                                                |
          |===== * * * END OF FILE * * *                        |
          |                                                     |
          |===>                                                 |<--Command Line
          |                                  X E D I T  1 FILE  |<--Status Area
          +-----------------------------------------------------+
           |   | |                                             |
           +---+ +---------------------------------------------+
             |                         |
          Prefix Area              File Area
 
             At the top of the screen is the File Identification (File Id) Line,
          which contains the filename, filetype,  and filemode of the file being
          edited.  The next two items on this line indicate the record format (V
          for variable-length,   F for  fixed-length,  VP  for packed  variable-
          length, or FP for packed fixed-length)  and the maximum record length.
          Following are the  truncation column (TRUNC),  the number  of lines in
          the file  (SIZE),  the  current line  number (LINE),   and the  column
          pointer position (COLUMN).  You cannot type on this line.
 
                                            Section 5:  Editing CMS Files     41
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
             Following the  File Id  Line is the  Message Line,   which displays
          XEDIT error and informational messages.  You cannot type on this line.
 
             The lines following the Message Line make up the File Area.   These
          lines are used to  display and enter data.   You may  type directly in
          this area to enter  new lines or modify existing lines.    One line in
          the File Area  is designated the current line.   This  line appears in
          the middle of the  screen and is highlighted to make  it easy to find.
          The current line  is important because many  XEDIT subcommands perform
          their functions on the  current line or on a group  of lines beginning
          with the current line.
 
             Each line in  the File Area is  preceded by a special  command area
          called  the Prefix  Area (marked  with  five  equal  signs:  =====  ).
          Commands entered  in the  Prefix Area  are called  prefix subcommands;
          these  generally operate  on the  line  upon which  they are  entered.
          Prefix subcommands can be used to add, delete,  duplicate,  move,  and
          copy lines in  the file.   Use the  SET PREFIX ON RIGHT  subcommand to
          move the prefix area to the right of the screen; use SET PREFIX OFF to
          remove the area entirely.  The SET NUMBER ON subcommand may be used to
          display line numbers in the prefix area.
 
             The Command  Line is actually one  and three-quarters of a  line at
          the  bottom of  the screen  (indicated  by the  large arrow).    XEDIT
          subcommands are entered on this line.   These subcommands may be typed
          in either uppercase or lowercase,  or a combination of both,  and many
          can be abbreviated.   XEDIT macros, EXECs, and CP and CMS commands may
          also be entered on  this line.   This line can be moved  to the top of
          the screen with the SET CMDLINE TOP subcommand.   If this is done, the
          command line and message line will share the same space.
 
             The arrow  on the command  line and  the first blank  following the
          arrow are protected;  you cannot type over them.   Press RESET and use
          the keys with up, down, left, and right arrows to move the cursor to a
          non-protected column before typing.   Commands on the command line may
          be preceded by the "&" character in column one;  this will cause XEDIT
          to leave the command on the screen.   The command may then be repeated
          by pressing ENTER.  Multiple subcommands may be entered on the command
          line by separating them with a  line end character.   The default line
          end character is a pound sign (#).
 
             The  Status Area  is on  the right  at  the bottom  of the  screen,
          following the  command line.   The  status area indicates  the current
          operating status of the editing session (for example, XEDIT, COPY/MOVE
          PENDING,  BLOCK INCOMPLETE,   or INPUT MODE)   and the number of files
          currently being  edited.   Use of the  SET CMDLINE TOP or  SET CMDLINE
          BOTTOM subcommands will prevent the status area from being displayed.
 
             The Scale Line is much like the  margin scale on a typewriter.   It
          appears under the current line and  indicates the column numbers,  the
          position of the column pointer (marked  "|"),  the left and right zone
          columns (marked "<" and ">"),  and the truncation column (marked "T").
          The column under which the column  pointer is positioned is called the
 
 
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          current column.   (See the section  on column-oriented subcommands for
          more information.)   The scale line can  be repositioned on the screen
          and  placed  under  a  specified  line  with  the  SET  SCALE  ON  "n"
          subcommand;  the scale line can be removed entirely with the SET SCALE
          OFF subcommand.
 
             Several keyboard  functions are  available on  3270-type terminals.
          The ENTER  key will  cause XEDIT to  read the  screen and  analyze its
          contents.   The CLEAR key will clear  the screen and cause the display
          to be  rebuilt as it  was after the  last time ENTER  or a PF  key was
          pressed.   The ERASE INPUT key will  erase everything in the input and
          command areas  (WARNING:  Pressing  this key  by mistake  will destroy
          newly entered data).  The ERASE EOF key will erase all characters from
          the cursor to the end of the line.  In power input mode, this key will
          erase all characters from the cursor to the end of the screen.
 
             PA1 will transfer control to CP and clear the screen, and a CP READ
          status will be displayed;  enter BEGIN  to return to XEDIT.   PA2 will
          set nulls on for the line containing  the cursor.   The FIELD MARK key
          inserts a  logical tab character into  the data stream at  the current
          cursor  location (expansion  of the  tabs  will occur  only after  the
          screen  has been  rewritten).    DUP will  insert  a unique  character
          (hexadecimal 1C)  and  physically move the cursor to the  start of the
          next field (usually the start of the next line or prefix area).
 
             The INS MODE key is used to  insert characters,  and the DEL key is
          used to delete characters (more information on these keys may be found
          later in this section).
 
             Several keys may be used to move the cursor forward, backward,  up,
          and down on the screen.  A cluster of four keys marked with arrows are
          used to move the cursor one space at a time.  The new line key (marked
          with an  arrow pointing  down and to  the left)  is  used to  move the
          cursor to the beginning of the next line.
 
             The Program Function (PF)  keys will cause the data associated with
          them to be processed.   Each PF key can be set to an XEDIT subcommand,
          which is executed when the key  is pressed.   The initial settings are
          as follows:
 
               PF1   HELP MENU      Displays help files.
               PF2   SOS LINEADD    Adds a new line after the line containing
                                    the cursor.
               PF3   QUIT           Quits a file.
               PF4   TABKEY         Moves the cursor to the next tab column.
               PF5   SCHANGE6       Makes selective changes.
               PF6   ?              Redisplays the last subcommand.
               PF7   BACKWARD       Scrolls the screen backward.
               PF8   FORWARD        Scrolls the screen forward.
               PF9   =              Re-executes the last subcommand.
               PF10  SPLIT CURSOR   Splits lines at the cursor position.
               PF11  JOIN CURSOR    Joins lines at the cursor position.
                                    WARNING: This can be destructive.  Data
                                    following the cursor is written over
 
                                            Section 5:  Editing CMS Files     43
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
                                    with data from the next line.
               PF12  CURSOR COLUMN  Moves the cursor to the current line
                                    and column.
 
          You can use the  QUERY PF subcommand to display PF  key settings.   To
          change the settings, use the SET PF subcommand:
 
               set pfn subcommand
 
          where  "n"  is  a  PF  key number,   and  "subcommand"  is  any  XEDIT
          subcommand.   When you use SET PF,  the  new PF key setting remains in
          effect for that editing session only.
 
             You  can enter  data  into  a file  by  using  the INPUT  or  POWER
          subcommands.  You can use the INPUT subcommand to get into input mode.
          After you issue INPUT,  the input zone (the bottom half of the screen,
          between the  scale and  the command line)   will appear.    The screen
          changes in input mode:  the prefix  areas disappear,  the message line
          and status area indicate that you are  in input mode,  and the command
          line says "INPUT ZONE",  to show you  where the input zone ends and to
          remind you that you cannot enter subcommands in this mode.
 
             If the entire  input zone has been  filled and you want  to stay in
          input mode and type more data,  press  the ENTER key once.   The lines
          already typed will move to the top  half of the screen,  with the last
          line entered  becoming the new current  line.   The input zone  is now
          available for  more data.   When all  data has been typed,   press the
          ENTER key twice to get out of input mode and back into edit mode.  The
          display will  be restored  to the  edit mode  screen layout  described
          earlier, and the file will contain the data just typed.  You may enter
          input mode at any  time during an editing session to  insert new lines
          in the file;  XEDIT makes room for new lines of data after the current
          line.
 
             Power typing mode is useful for typing  a large amount of text;  it
          allows you to enter data as if the screen were one long line.  You can
          start typing a  word on one line  and finish it on  the next,  because
          when the end of a line is reached, XEDIT automatically wraps around to
          the beginning  of the next  line.   You can  type until the  screen is
          filled.   The LINEND  character (a pound sign "#" by  default)  can be
          used to mark the beginning of a new  line.   Note that the PF4 key may
          not be used for tabbing in power typing mode.
 
             To  enter power  typing mode,   type  the POWER  subcommand in  the
          command line and  press the ENTER key.    If you fill the  screen with
          data and  want to remain  in power typing  mode,  press the  ENTER key
          once.  The last line typed will be displayed at the top of the screen;
          the rest of the screen will be blank and ready for more typing.   When
          finished,  press the ENTER key twice  to enter edit mode.   XEDIT will
          automatically divide data into proper screen lines and reconstruct any
          split words.   You can use power typing  at any time during an editing
          session.  As with input mode, data is inserted after the current line.
 
 
                                            Section 5:  Editing CMS Files     44
 
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             The current  line concept  is an important  one because  many XEDIT
          subcommands (such as INPUT and POWER)  begin their operations starting
          with the  current line.   To  make any line  on the screen  become the
          current line,  type the diagonal (/)   character in the prefix area of
          the line and press ENTER.
 
             By default the current  line is the file line in  the middle of the
          screen  (above the  scale).    It is  "highlighted"  and thus  appears
          brighter than the other file lines.   The line that is current changes
          when you scroll the  screen or move up and down  through a file.   The
          position of  the current line  may be  redefined with the  SET CURLINE
          subcommand.   For  example,  SET  CURLINE ON 3  would cause  the first
          available screen  line to become the  current line.   By  changing the
          position of the current line, you can vary the size of the input zone.
          For a larger input zone,  move the  current line higher on the screen;
          for a smaller input zone, move it lower.
 
             Once you have  finished typing your data,  you may  want to perform
          some basic editing  functions on a particular line (or  lines)  in the
          file.  Prefix subcommands may be used for this; they allow you to add,
          delete, move, copy, and duplicate lines.  Prefix subcommands are typed
          directly into the prefix area on one  or more lines,  and are executed
          when the ENTER key is pressed.   They may be typed in either uppercase
          or lowercase.   Arguments may either  precede or follow the subcommand
          in the prefix area.  (This can cause problems when SET NUMBER ON is in
          effect,  because the line numbers in the prefix areas could be used as
          arguments by the  subcommands.   It's best to first use  the ERASE EOF
          key to erase the line numbers when entering prefix subcommands.)
 
             To add a line  to a file,  type the single character  "A" or "a" in
          the  prefix area  and press  ENTER.   A  blank line  will be  inserted
          immediately after the line containing the "A".   If more than one line
          is to be  added,  a number may  precede or follow the  "A" to indicate
          this;  for example, "A3", "3A", "a3", or "3a" will all add three blank
          lines.
 
             To delete  a line,   type the single  character "D"  or "d"  in the
          prefix area of the line to be  deleted,  and press the ENTER key.   If
          more than one line  is to be deleted,  a number  may precede or follow
          the "D" to indicate this;  for example, "D4", "4D", "d4", or "4d" will
          all delete four lines,  beginning with the line upon which the command
          is typed.
 
             To delete a block of consecutive lines,  enter the double character
          "DD" or "dd" in the prefix area of both the first and last lines to be
          deleted.   Press the ENTER key and the lines will be deleted;  there's
          no need to count them.   Also,  the  first and last lines of the block
          need not appear on the same screen;   you may scroll the screen before
          entering the second "DD".   When one "DD" has been typed in the prefix
          area and the ENTER key is pressed,  the status area of the screen will
          indicate "BLOCK  INCOMPLETE".   This means  that another "DD"  must be
          typed in the prefix area in order  for the command to execute.   After
          the second  "DD" has been  typed on the last  line of the  block,  the
 
 
                                            Section 5:  Editing CMS Files     45
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          ENTER  key should  be  pressed;  the  entire block  of  lines will  be
          deleted.
 
             If you find you have deleted lines that you meant to keep,  you can
          recover  them  during  an  editing  session  by  issuing  the  RECOVER
          subcommand (described earlier).   Note,  however,   that the number of
          lines RECOVER can keep is limited.
 
             To move a line,  type the single character "M" or "m" in the prefix
          area of the  line to be moved.   Indicate its  destination by entering
          the single character "F" (following) or "P" (preceding)  in the prefix
          area of another  line.   Press ENTER and the line  containing "M" will
          move from its original location  and be inserted immediately following
          the  line  containing the  "F",   or  immediately preceding  the  line
          containing the "P".   If more than one  line is to be moved,  a number
          may precede or follow the "M" to indicate this;  for example,  "M6" or
          "6M" will cause six lines to be moved.
 
             The line  to be moved  and its destination  need not appear  on the
          same screen.  When "M" or "F" or "P" has been typed and ENTER has been
          pressed,   the status  area  of the  screen  will indicate  "COPY/MOVE
          PENDING".   You may scroll the screen before entering the other prefix
          subcommand.  Press ENTER to cause the lines to be moved.
 
             To move a  block of consecutive lines,  enter  the double character
          "MM" in the prefix area of both the  first and last lines to be moved.
          These lines may  appear on different screens,  as  may the destination
          line (indicated by "F" or "P").
 
             You may copy lines the same way that  you move them,  with a "C" or
          "CC" prefix subcommand instead of "M" or "MM".   This procedure leaves
          the  original  line  or  lines  in place  and  makes  a  copy  at  the
          destination line, which is indicated by "F" or "P".
 
             To duplicate a line,  enter the  double quote (")  character in the
          prefix area of the line to be duplicated and press ENTER.  If you wish
          to duplicate a line more than one time, a number may precede or follow
          the ".   For  example,  3" or "3  would duplicate a line  three times.
          Duplicate  lines  will  be inserted  immediately  following  the  line
          duplicated.
 
             To duplicate a block of consecutive  lines,  type two double quotes
          ("")  in  the first  and last  lines of  the block.    If you  wish to
          duplicate a block more than one time,   a number may precede or follow
          the first double quote (for example,  4""  or ""4).   If you type only
          one "" and press  ENTER,  the status area of the  screen will indicate
          "BLOCK INCOMPLETE".   You may scroll  the screen before completing the
          block; press ENTER to cause the completed block to be duplicated.
 
             To cancel  prefix subcommands that  create a "BLOCK  INCOMPLETE" or
          "COPY/MOVE  PENDING" status,   type the  following  subcommand on  the
          command line:
 
               reset
 
                                            Section 5:  Editing CMS Files     46
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          and press ENTER.   All prefix  subcommands will disappear,  and prefix
          areas will  be restored  to their original  appearance.   If  you have
          typed  any  prefix  subcommands  (including   those  which  create  an
          incomplete or pending status)  but have  not pressed ENTER,  press the
          CLEAR key and the prefix subcommands will be removed.
 
             It is possible to insert and delete letters, spaces, and words in a
          file.   To insert, move the cursor to the place where the insertion is
          to be made, press the PA2 key,  press the INS MODE key,  then make the
          insertion.   The PA2 key must be pressed each time the cursor is moved
          to another line.   When all insertions have been made, press the RESET
          key.   Insert mode may be used in both edit and input modes;  in power
          typing mode, only the INS MODE key need be pressed.
 
             To  make  insertions   on  several  lines,   enter   the  following
          subcommand:
 
               set nulls on
 
          The INS MODE key  may now be used without pressing  PA2 for each line.
          When all insertions have been made, you can issue the subcommand:
 
               set nulls off
 
          SET NULLS ON is a useful subcommand to have in your PROFILE XEDIT; see
          "Other XEDIT Features" elsewhere in  this section for more information
          on PROFILE XEDIT.
 
             Use the DEL key to delete characters.   Data on the screen may also
          be changed by moving the cursor to the desired location and typing the
          new data.
 
             XEDIT subcommands, entered on the command line, are used to perform
          complex editing functions.    For example,  the SPLIT  subcommand will
          split the line containing the cursor at the cursor position.  The JOIN
          subcommand will join the line containing  the cursor and the following
          line, and delete the original lines from the file.   The new line will
          be truncated to fit within the current record length.   WARNING:  This
          subcommand  can  be  destructive if  used  improperly,   because  data
          following the cursor is written over with data from the next line.
 
             When  used  from  a  3270-type  terminal,   the  CHANGE  subcommand
          (described earlier)   has an additional  capability:   you can  make a
          selective change (change  one word to another only part  of the time).
          To do this,  first determine where you  want the search to begin,  and
          make  that  line  the  current  line.    Type  the  CHANGE  subcommand
          (change/oldword/newword/) in the command line, but do not press ENTER.
          Instead,   press the  PF5 key.    The cursor  will move  to the  first
          occurrence  of the  old  word,  and  the line  containing  it will  be
          highlighted.   If you wish to change the word, press the PF6 key.   To
          go on to the  next occurrence of the word,  press  the PF5 key.   This
          allows you to locate all occurrences of the old word, and to change it
          only when desired.
 
 
                                            Section 5:  Editing CMS Files     47
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
             XEDIT has  the capacity to  simultaneously edit several  CMS files,
          display more  than one file,  and  display multiple views of  a single
          file.   The XEDIT subcommand will cause a new edit level to be entered
          (each edit level contains a different file),  and will accept a fileid
          as an argument.   The specified file  will replace the current file on
          the screen.   Both files  are still in memory and a  FILE or QUIT will
          affect the current file and cause XEDIT to switch back to the previous
          edit level.  Using the XEDIT subcommand with no arguments causes XEDIT
          to switch the display to another existing edit level.  To see the data
          in more than one  file at a time,  or to edit  different portions of a
          file simultaneously,   use the  SCREEN subcommand  to define  multiple
          screens.  For example:
 
               set screen 2
 
          would divide the screen into two screens.  Each screen may display the
          data from one edit  level.   Note that to terminate XEDIT,   a FILE or
          QUIT must be entered for each edit level, or the CANCEL command may be
          used to QUIT all edit levels at once.
 
             More  documentation  for  XEDIT  is   available  in  the  UKCC  CJS
          Reference,   including a  complete  explanation of  all  of the  XEDIT
          subcommands.  An XEDIT reference card is also available.  Refer to the
          IBM VM/SP:  System Product Editor Reference  and User's Guide for more
          information.
 
          XEDIT From An ASCII Terminal
 
             XEDIT considers  all ASCII  terminals to  be typewriter  terminals,
          even those that actually have display screens.
 
             After you enter the XEDIT command  from a typewriter terminal,  you
          can enter  input mode  by issuing the  INPUT subcommand.    Every line
          entered is  then considered  a data  line.   After  you have  finished
          entering  data,   press the  RETURN  key  on  an  empty line  (a  line
          containing no data) to return to edit mode.
 
             You can enter input  mode at any time during an  editing session to
          insert new lines of data in a file.   If you have just created a file,
          the lines  are inserted  at the beginning  of the  file.   If  you are
          adding to an existing file,  the  lines are inserted after the current
          line.
 
             Many XEDIT subcommands operate on,   or starting with,  the current
          line.   When  the current line changes,   we say the line  pointer has
          moved.  When editing on a typewriter terminal, you must first position
          the line pointer at the line you want to change; change the line; then
          position the line pointer at the next line to be changed.   To display
          the current line, enter the TYPE subcommand:
 
               type
 
                                            Section 5:  Editing CMS Files     48
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          and press the RETURN key.
 
             To display more than one line,   enter the TYPE subcommand followed
          by the number of lines you wish to see.  For example:
 
               type 7
 
          displays seven lines, beginning with the current line.   The last line
          displayed then becomes the new current line.
 
             To display the lines in a file from the current line to the end-of-
          file, enter the following subcommand:
 
               type *
 
             You can  display all  of the  data in  a file  by entering  the TOP
          subcommand  and  then the  TYPE  *  subcommand,   or by  entering  the
          following single subcommand:
 
               :0 type *
 
          After TYPE is  executed,  the last line displayed  becomes the current
          line.
 
             You can also use the UP and DOWN subcommands to examine a file.  UP
          moves the line  pointer toward the beginning of the  file and displays
          the new current line.   DOWN moves the  line pointer toward the end of
          the file  and displays the  new current  line.   The format  for these
          subcommands is:
 
               up n
               down n
 
          where "n" is  the number of lines  you want to move  the line pointer.
          If the number is omitted, "1" is assumed.
 
             To insert new lines  of data after any file line,   issue the UP or
          DOWN subcommand  to move  to the line  after which  you want  the data
          inserted.   Then enter the INPUT subcommand.   To move to the null TOF
          line at the top of the file, enter the TOP subcommand.  To move to the
          last file line,  enter the BOTTOM  subcommand.   To enter new lines at
          the beginning or end of a file, enter:
 
               top (or bottom)
               input
 
          and enter your new data lines.
 
             When data is  displayed,  a character in each  line is underscored.
          The underscore  represents the  column pointer,   which indicates  the
          current column (generally,  column one).    The underscore (_)  is not
          contained in  the file and  will not appear on  a printed copy  of the
          file.   To suppress the typing of  this underscore,  SET COLPTR OFF in
 
 
                                            Section 5:  Editing CMS Files     49
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          your XEDIT  PROFILE.   The  column pointer can  be moved  to different
          column positions  with the  use of  certain XEDIT  subcommands;  these
          column subcommands are useful at an ASCII terminal (see the section on
          column subcommands for more information).
 
             You can insert a  line of data between existing lines  by using the
          INPUT subcommand  followed by the line  of data to be  inserted.   One
          blank  must separate  the subcommand  name  and the  data line.    For
          example:
 
               input here is the line
 
          inserts a single line following the current line, without leaving edit
          mode.   To insert a blank line,   enter the INPUT subcommand and press
          the SPACE bar twice,  then press the RETURN key.   To insert more than
          one line,   enter input mode by  issuing the INPUT subcommand  with no
          operand.
 
             In input mode on a typewriter terminal,  subcommands may be entered
          by beginning the line with an  escape character.   This character is a
          diagonal (/)  for all filetypes except JOB  and JCL,  which use a plus
          (+)  sign.   This  means that no data  line may begin with  the escape
          character.  This feature may be disabled by issuing the SET ESCAPE OFF
          subcommand.
 
             To replace a  line (delete the current  line and replace it  with a
          line you specify), enter the following:
 
               replace text
 
          where "text" is the text that is to replace the current line.   If you
          enter REPLACE with  no text,  the editor deletes the  current line and
          places you in input mode.
 
             More  documentation  for  XEDIT  is   available  in  the  UKCC  CJS
          Reference,   including a  complete  explanation of  all  of the  XEDIT
          subcommands.  An XEDIT reference card is also available.  Refer to the
          IBM VM/SP:  System Product Editor Reference  and User's Guide for more
          information.
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                            Section 5:  Editing CMS Files     50
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          Section 6:  Printed Output
 
 
             If you need a printed copy of  your work,  CJS provides a number of
          methods.   There are high-speed line printers  at the UKCC and at HASP
          remote sites, low-speed RSCS printers in a few locations,  and you can
          use an ASCII  printing terminal with a modem nearly  anywhere that has
          telephone service.
 
             You can print the  contents of a CMS disk file  by issuing a SETPRT
          command to select  a destination (any HASP or RSCS  printer)  and then
          issuing the PRINT command.  For example, the commands:
 
               setprt route hot
               print some data
 
          would print the file "SOME DATA" on the HOT (hands-on)  printer at the
          UKCC.   The SETPRT  command can route your printed output  to the UKCC
          Computer Room (CENTRAL), the HOT printer at the UKCC,  an RSCS printer
          (Pnnnn), or a HASP remote site (RMTnn).
 
             The SETPRT command is also used to  specify the kind of paper to be
          used when  your output is printed.    For output routed  CENTRAL,  the
          standard form is  14 x 11 inch  paper,  with all letters  converted to
          uppercase.    Printed output  routed  to the  UKCC  Computer Room  may
          request any of the following special forms:
 
               Form  Description
               LT    Labels (3 1/2 x 15/16), Mixed Case
               NT    Narrow Unlined Paper (8 1/2 x 11), Mixed Case
               STD.  Regular Paper (14 x 11), Uppercase
               T     Regular Paper (14 x 11), Mixed Case
               5106  Labels (3 1/2 x 15/16), Uppercase
               5162  Narrow Unlined Paper (8 1/2 x 11), Uppercase
 
          To specify T forms (regular paper with mixed case printing), you would
          use the following command:
 
               setprt route central forms t
 
          The  forms specification  is  ignored for  output  routed  to the  HOT
          printer or to  an RSCS printer.   HASP remote sites  control their own
          forms, so always consult someone at the site before requesting special
          forms.
 
             To produce output at a printing terminal,  use the TPRINT (Terminal
          PRINT)  command.   TPRINT uses standard ASCII Line Feed (LF)  and Form
          Feed (FF) characters to control the terminal, so the terminal that you
          use should support these functions.   Most terminals require some kind
 
 
                                               Section 6:  Printed Output     51
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          of forms alignment before they can be used with TPRINT.   This usually
          involves positioning the paper  at the first print line on  a page and
          pressing some  control keys to indicate  to the terminal that  this is
          the top of a page.   (Consult the manual for the terminal that you are
          using for details.)   TPRINT supports both continuous forms and single
          sheets.
 
             If you want to produce letters, memos, reports, or other documents,
          you should use SCRIPT,  a text  formatter.   You create CMS disk files
          containing your text and SCRIPT "control words" and SCRIPT will create
          an  output file  suitable  for printing.    SCRIPT  can handle  simple
          letters and memos,   and more complicated documents  that require page
          headings, indexes, and a table of contents.   This manual was produced
          using SCRIPT.
 
             SCRIPT can be  used with SETPRT to  send its output to  be printed.
          For example,  if you have a file named "AUCKLAND SCRIPT" you could use
          the following command:
 
               setprt route central doc
               script auckland ( prt
 
          to format and print the file.   (Note that files used with SCRIPT must
          always have a  filetype of SCRIPT.)   The DOC parameter  of the SETPRT
          command specifies  that narrow  unlined paper and  a mixed  (upper and
          lower) case print train be used when printing the output.
 
             SCRIPT can also print directly on your terminal.  For example,
 
               script auckland
 
          would format the "AUCKLAND SCRIPT" file and print it on your terminal.
 
             Printed  output routed  to  CENTRAL is  treated  much like  printed
          output from an OS  batch job.   You must go to the  Data Center at the
          UKCC to claim your  output,  and you must use the  "runid" assigned to
          your output when it was printed.   The  runid is sent to your terminal
          in a message when you route output to CENTRAL, HOT, or a HASP remote:
 
               hh:mm:ss name   runid   ON VIRTUAL WRITER
 
          The runid  will consist of  a letter and  four digits.   If  you route
          output to the  HOT printer,  you will receive another  message when it
          actually begins printing:
 
               hh:mm:ss name   runid   ON HOT PRINTER
 
             The commands used for producing printed output are described in the
          UKCC  CJS  Reference and  by  the  HELP  command.    You may  also  be
          interested in  the LABELS  command,  used  to produce  printed labels.
          SCRIPT is documented in several manuals.  The one to start with is the
          Waterloo SCRIPT  User's Guide.   Detailed  descriptions of  the SCRIPT
          control words can be found in the Waterloo SCRIPT Reference Manual.
 
 
                                               Section 6:  Printed Output     52
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          Section 7:  Communicating with Other CJS Users
 
 
             You can communicate  with other CJS users by  sending and receiving
          messages, notes, and files.
 
             To communicate with another CJS user, you need to know the person's
          userid (user identification).   You can create a special file called a
          "names file" that contains a list  of userids of those you communicate
          with.   Once you make an entry for a user in your names file,  you can
          refer to that user by name rather than by userid.
 
             A names file can also contain mailing addresses, phone numbers, and
          other information.    You can even assign  a nickname to  each person.
          Then,  when you send messages,  notes,  and  files to a user,  you can
          identify that person by using his or her nickname.
 
             You  can  use either  a  3270-type  display  terminal or  an  ASCII
          terminal  to communicate  with others,   but  with slightly  different
          procedures.   As we describe each command,   we'll also explain how to
          use it from each type of terminal.
 
             To assign  nicknames to  other users,   you must  first create  the
          "names file."  You do this by issuing the NAMES command, which creates
          a file  called "userid NAMES A"  where "userid" is your  userid.   You
          will then  enter specific  information,  called  an "entry,"  into the
          names file.   The  names file is a  collection of all the  entries you
          create.  The first entry should be for yourself; this information will
          be used for note headings, which are explained later in this section.
 
             To create a names  file at a 3270-type terminal,  log  on and enter
          the NAMES command:
 
               names
 
          and press the ENTER key.   The  terminal will display a special screen
          for data entry,  with blank spaces for the other user's userid,  name,
          phone number, and address.  Type the requested information directly on
          the screen.   You  can also enter a  list of names in  the NAMES file,
          giving a group of people the same nickname.  Enter this information in
          either uppercase or lowercase,  and do  not use commas to separate the
          names in the "List of Names" area:
 
               Nickname:  folks
               List of names:  usr244   usr245   usr246   johnny
 
          Now you can use  the name "folks" to refer to all of  the users on the
          list.   Notice that  the list may contain both  userids and nicknames.
          After filling in the information,  press the PF2 key to enter the data
 
 
                           Section 7:  Communicating with Other CJS Users     53
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          in the names file.    You will receive a message telling  you this has
          been done.  To type another entry, press the PF4 key.  This clears the
          blank spaces  and allows you to  type information for the  next entry.
          Press the PF3 key to exit from  the screen when you've finished adding
          entries.
 
             To create  a names file  on an ASCII  terminal,  you would  log on,
          enter the NAMES command, and then press the RETURN key.   The terminal
          will display the message "You are now editing your userid NAMES file",
          where  "userid" is  your userid,   and give  you a  prompt (a  period)
          indicating that you are to enter another command.  Get into INPUT mode
          by entering:
 
               input
 
          The system should respond:
 
               INPUT:
 
          You will receive  a prompt indicating that  it's all right to  type in
          the nickname.    If you  often communicate  with someone  named Johnny
          whose userid  is USR233,  you could  make the following entry  in your
          names file:
 
               :nick.johnny  :userid.usr233
 
          After doing so, press RETURN.   Now you can use the name "johnny" when
          referring to the userid "USR233".   You  can use the same procedure to
          type in the user's name, phone number, and address if you want.   When
          you've finished entering data, press RETURN twice to leave INPUT mode.
          Then file the names file by entering:
 
               file
 
          and pressing  RETURN.   Now you  can use  the nickname instead  of the
          userid when you send messages, notes, and files.  You can also enter a
          list of names  in the NAMES file,   giving a group of  people the same
          nickname.   Enter this  information in either uppercase  or lowercase,
          and do not use commas to separate the names in the list:
 
               :nick.folks   :list.usr234   usr235   usr236   johnny
 
          Now you can use  the name "folks" to refer to all of  the users on the
          list.  Notice that the list may contain both userids and nicknames.
 
             Enter "HELP NAMES" for more information on the NAMES command.
 
             You can  send a  short message to  a logged on  user with  the TELL
          command:
 
               tell johnny  Have you submitted that job yet?
 
 
                           Section 7:  Communicating with Other CJS Users     54
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          This would  send a  message to userid  USR233,  since  we gave  it the
          nickname "johnny."  You can also send a message to a group of users:
 
               tell folks  It's time to go home.
 
          The text is limited to around  120 characters.   The TELL command uses
          the CP MESSAGE command to send the  message,  so the receiving user or
          users must be  logged on and must  not have SET MSG  OFF.   The system
          will tell you if a message cannot be sent.
 
             TELL can only be used to send a  brief message to a logged on user.
          To send a longer  message,  or to send a message to a  user who is not
          logged on,  you can  use the NOTE command.   The simplest  form of the
          NOTE command requires only the name of a recipient:
 
               note  johnny
 
          You can also use a list of nicknames and userids:
 
               note  usr234   johnny   usr236
 
          NOTE will construct  a header for your message that  will include your
          userid and the  the names of the  recipients,  and then call  XEDIT to
          allow you to  enter the text of  your message.   Enter "INPUT"  to get
          into INPUT mode, and then type in your message.  When you've finished,
          press ENTER or  RETURN twice.   If you're using  a 3270-type terminal,
          press  the PF5  key  to send  the  message.   If  you're  at an  ASCII
          terminal, type the following:
 
               send
 
          and press RETURN.
 
             You'll receive  a message  at either type  of terminal  telling you
          that your note has been sent.   NOTE also has options to keep a log of
          the notes that you send and automatic acknowledgements when your notes
          are  received.    Enter   "HELP  NOTE"  at  your   terminal  for  more
          information.
 
             If you want to send a file to another user (or users),  you can use
          the SENDFILE command.   Both NOTE and SENDFILE transmit files as spool
          files in a special format called "NETDATA."
 
             Enter  the  SENDFILE  command  as  shown  below  from  a  3270-type
          terminal:
 
               sendfile
 
          This will produce a special screen for  data entry.   You can type the
          name of the file to be sent and the name of the recipient (you may use
          nicknames)  directly on the screen in the areas specified.   After you
          fill in the information,  press PF5 or PF10 to send the file.   You'll
          receive a message telling you the file has been sent.
 
 
                           Section 7:  Communicating with Other CJS Users     55
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
             You can issue the SENDFILE command in  the form below from either a
          3270-type or an ASCII terminal:
 
               sendfile  filename  filetype  to  userid
 
          where "userid" is  the recipient of the file (you  may use nicknames).
          You can send a file to more than one user.  For example, if you have a
          file named  "URGENT MEMO"  to be  sent to  a group  of users  with the
          nickname "folks", you could use the command:
 
               sendfile  urgent  memo  to  folks
 
          After entering the SENDFILE command,  press  the RETURN key and you'll
          get a message indicating that the file has been sent.
 
             SENDFILE can also send several files  in one transmission.   To use
          this feature,  you must first create a file containing the identifiers
          of the files  to be sent.   For  example,  suppose a file  named "TEST
          FILES" contains the following lines:
 
               &1  &2  SAMPLE  DATA  A1
               &1  &2  MORE    DATA  A1
               &1  &2  EXPLAIN MEMO  A1
 
          (Note the  "&1 &2".   These must  be present.)   Then,   the following
          command:
 
               sendfile  test  files  to  johnny
 
          will send the three files named in  "TEST FILES",  and a copy of "TEST
          FILES", to userid usr233   (nicknamed "johnny").
 
             You can abbreviate SENDFILE by  using "SF".   For more information,
          enter "HELP SENDFILE" at your terminal.
 
             Notes and  files that other  users send  you are delivered  to your
          "reader," a temporary  place on a disk where incoming  notes and files
          are kept until you decide what to do with them.  After you log on, you
          may get a message like this:
 
               FILES:  002 RDR, NO PRT, NO PUN
 
          This tells you that you have two files in your reader.   You might get
          a message to this effect while you're  editing a file;  if you're at a
          3270-type terminal, press the CLEAR key to get back to your file.   If
          you're printing  something at a hardcopy  terminal and you  don't want
          such messages  to appear,   issue the  SET MSG  OFF and  SET IMSG  OFF
          commands.   When you've finished printing, don't forget to set MSG and
          IMSG on again.
 
             When you have files in your reader,  you can issue the QUERY READER
          ALL command to find out the file names:
 
               q rdr all
 
                           Section 7:  Communicating with Other CJS Users     56
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          If you want to  look at a file in your reader  without first moving it
          to your  disk and making  it a permanent file,   you can use  the PEEK
          command.   PEEK works the same way  from both types of terminal.   For
          example,  let's say you issue the Q  RDR ALL command and there are two
          files in your reader.  You'll get a message like this:
 
          ORIGINID FILE CLASS RECORDS CPY HOLD DATE  TIME     NAME  TYPE  DIST
          USR355   9366 A PUN 0000012 001 NONE 03/11 09:03:16 TEST1 FILE  USR233
          USR444   9363 A PUN 0000010 001 NONE 03/11 09:03:16 SHEEP DATA  USR233
 
          To look  at the files without  making them permanent,  issue  the PEEK
          command and  the file number  given by "Q RDR  ALL".   To look  at the
          first file listed above at a 3270-type terminal, you would enter:
 
               peek
 
          The file will appear on the  terminal screen.   When you have finished
          viewing the file, issue the QUIT command.  From an ASCII terminal, you
          would enter:
 
               peek
 
          which would cause you to receive a message like this:
 
               FILE TEST1 FILE FROM USR355 AT UKCC.  FORMAT IS NETDATA.
 
          The file will appear on the ASCII  display screen or be printed on the
          ASCII hardcopy  terminal.   When you  have finished viewing  the file,
          issue the QUIT command.  PEEK uses XEDIT to display the file on either
          type of terminal, so any XEDIT command is allowed.
 
             PEEK can also be used to examine all  or part of a print file (such
          as output from a  batch job),  limited to about 1500  lines at a time.
          If the  file isn't  in NETDATA or  DISK DUMP  format,  PEEK  will only
          display  the first  200 lines  of the  file.   You  can specify  other
          starting points and line counts.   Enter  "HELP PEEK" at your terminal
          for more information.
 
             If you  want to make  the file permanent and  put it on  your disk,
          issue the ACCEPT command from either type of terminal:
 
               accept
 
          Provided that you have enough disk space, ACCEPT can receive a file of
          any size.  Both PEEK and ACCEPT can process spool files in any format,
          including NETDATA, DISK DUMP, print, and READCARD.
 
             But  what happens  if  a file  in  your reader  has  the same  file
          identifier as one you already have on your disk?  If you try to ACCEPT
          such a file, you'll get a message like this:
 
               FILE 'fn ft fm' ALREADY EXISTS -- SPECIFY 'REPLACE' OPTION.
 
 
                           Section 7:  Communicating with Other CJS Users     57
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          where "fn ft fm" is the filename,  filetype,  and filemode of both the
          file in your reader and the file on  your disk.   If you want the file
          in your  reader to replace  the file on  your disk,  issue  the ACCEPT
          command with the REPLACE option:
 
               accept  (replace
 
          This will  delete the  file on your  disk and cause  the file  in your
          reader to become permanent.
 
             If you want to  keep the file on your disk,  you can  give it a new
          file identifier with the RENAME command.   For example, if you want to
          change a file named "TEST DATA A" to "PAST DATA A",  you would use the
          RENAME command as shown below:
 
               rename  test data a   past data a
 
          This will change the file identifier of  the file on your disk.   Once
          this is done,  you  can ACCEPT the file in your  reader without losing
          the file already on your disk.
 
             You can produce  a list of your  reader spool files with  the RLIST
          command.   If you are using a  3270-type display terminal,  RLIST will
          produce a menu display in much the same way as the FLIST command.  You
          can issue the ACCEPT,  BURN (to  permanently delete a file),  and PEEK
          commands from the RLIST menu.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                           Section 7:  Communicating with Other CJS Users     58
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          Section 8:  OS Batch Jobs
 
 
             One of the  functions of CJS is  to provide a means  to prepare and
          submit OS  batch jobs from a  terminal.   Output from batch  jobs that
          would ordinarily be printed may be examined at your terminal,  sent to
          other users, or printed at the Computing Center or a remote site.   OS
          batch  jobs  are currently  processed  under  the  control of  an  IBM
          operating system called OS/MVT.
 
             The SUBMIT command  is used to submit OS batch  jobs.   SUBMIT will
          take one or more CMS disk  files containing JCL,  programs,  and data,
          and send  them to the  batch system  for processing.   Options  of the
          SUBMIT command control  the routing of the printed  and punched output
          from the job.  The batch system will send messages to your terminal to
          keep you informed of the job's progress.   You can also use the STATUS
          command to check  the status of a job  at any time.   You  can use the
          CANCEL command to  cancel a job after  it is accepted by  the OS batch
          system.
 
             Output from OS  batch jobs may be  routed to your userid  where you
          can process it in  several ways.   Batch job output is  sent to you in
          reader spool files and  can be treated in much the same  way as a file
          sent to  you by another  user.   You can  examine the output  with the
          PEEK,  RBROWSE,  and RXEDIT commands,  save it in a CMS disk file with
          the ACCEPT command, or print it with the OUTPUT command.
 
             If you  route the output  from your job  to the UKCC  Computer Room
          (CENTRAL),  you will need  the job's runid to claim the  output at the
          Data Center.   Status  messages from the OS batch  system will contain
          the runid,  and you can use the RUNID command to display the runids of
          OS batch jobs routed CENTRAL that you have submitted.
 
             OS jobs submitted through CJS are  not allowed operator replies and
          must have /*SETUP statements for tape  and disk mounts.   No more than
          three tapes are  allowed per job.   Users on the  Lexington campus are
          allowed to use  only 20000 and 17000 series tapes.    Remote users are
          allowed to use  only tapes with volume serial numbers  that start with
          the appropriate remote prefix (three letters),   or tapes in the 17000
          series.
 
 
 
 
 
                                                Section 8:  OS Batch Jobs     59
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          8.A Submitting a Job
 
             OS batch jobs  are submitted with the CMS  command SUBMIT.   SUBMIT
          accepts files containing fixed-length or variable-length records of up
          to 80 characters.
 
             Output (printed listings and punched cards)   can be routed back to
          your terminal as reader spool files, to the UKCC Computer Room, to the
          UKCC hands-on (HOT)   printer,  or to a remote  site.   Punched output
          cannot be produced  at the HOT printer,   and cannot be routed  to the
          UKCC Computer Room unless the printed output is also routed there.
 
             Output routed to the UKCC Computer Room  or a remote site will have
          the same  output limits  as jobs submitted  on punched  cards:  10,000
          lines and  2,000 cards.    These limits may  be changed  by specifying
          limits  on a  /*JOBPARM statement.    Output  routed to  the UKCC  HOT
          printer is limited to 1,600 lines.   Output routed back to your userid
          is limited to 1,600 lines and 2,000 cards unless you specify otherwise
          with a /*JOBPARM statement.  You cannot have more than 10,000 lines or
          10,000 cards routed to your userid.
 
             Printed output  routed to  the UKCC Computer  Room may  use several
          kinds of special forms (refer to the section in this manual on printed
          output for a  list of forms).   Special  forms are not allowed  on the
          UKCC HOT printer and should not be specified.   Special forms requests
          are ignored for output  routed back to the user.   Output  routed to a
          remote  site may  request  special forms,   but  the availability  and
          designation of special  forms is under the control  of each individual
          site.   Contact  the remote site  personnel before  requesting special
          forms at their location.
 
             Output routed back to your userid is sent in temporary files called
          "spool files" or  "reader files" or "reader spool  files."  You should
          process  such  files as  soon  as  you  can,   since spool  files  are
          automatically erased by the system when they are a week old.   This is
          done to  prevent the system spool  space from filling with  old files.
          You are charged for spool files, based on their size and how long they
          are kept.  Use the BURN or PURGE RDR command to discard a reader spool
          file when it is no longer needed.
 
             As your  job passes  through various  stages of  processing in  the
          batch system,  messages are sent to your userid.   These messages will
          contain the runid assigned by the batch system and the job name.   The
          runid will  consist of a letter  and a  four-digit job  number.   This
          runid is very important  because any output from a job  that is routed
          to the Computer  Room is filed by  the runid and cannot  be located in
          any other way.
 
             The following example illustrates how to  create a job,  submit it,
          and examine the results.  A file is created using XEDIT:
 
                //TEST  JOB 9999-99999,'A. USER'
                ..INCLUDE MY PASSWORD
 
                                                Section 8:  OS Batch Jobs     60
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
                //STEP1 EXEC WATFIV
                //GO.SYSIN DD *
                $JOB
                ..INCLUDE TEST FORTRAN
                $ENTRY
                ..INCLUDE TEST DATA
                /*
 
          A good name for the file would  be "TEST JOB".   The records beginning
          with  "..INCLUDE"  are  special instructions  to  the  SUBMIT  command
          indicating that the data  from another file is to be  inserted at that
          point.   INCLUDE statements must have  "..INC" starting in column one.
          The file "MY  PASSWORD" would contain the password  for account number
          9999-99999,  the file "TEST FORTRAN"  would contain a FORTRAN program,
          and the file "TEST DATA" would contain data for the program.
 
             The job will be submitted when you enter:
 
               submit test
 
          The SUBMIT command assumes  that a filetype of "JOB" or  "JCL" is used
          and will  locate and process  the file  "TEST JOB".   When  an INCLUDE
          statement is encountered,   the data from the specified  file is sent.
          The INCLUDE statement itself is not sent.
 
             The batch system will respond with the message:
 
               hh:mm:ss TEST  V0130 READ BY OS370
 
          where "hh:mm:ss"  is the  time-of-day,  "TEST" is  the job  name,  and
          "V0130" is the assigned runid.  If the job contains an invalid project
          number or password,  no further messages  are sent by the batch system
          and the output from  the job is sent to its  destination.   If the job
          has a valid project number and password,  it will go into the queue to
          await execution.  When the job begins execution, the message:
 
               hh:mm:ss TEST  V0130 IN EXECUTION
 
          will be sent by the batch  system.   When the job completes execution,
          the message:
 
               hh:mm:ss TEST  V0130 COMPLETED EXECUTION
 
          will  be sent  and the  job's output  will  be sent  to the  specified
          destination.  Since we did not specify any routing information in this
          example,  the output will be routed back in a reader spool file.   The
          message:
 
               PRT FILE 1029 FROM OS370 COPY 01 NOHOLD
 
          will be  received when the  file arrives.    If there was  any punched
          output, a second message will also be received:
 
               PUN FILE 1030 FROM OS370 COPY 01 NOHOLD
 
                                                Section 8:  OS Batch Jobs     61
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          The  numbers "1029"  and "1030"  in the  examples are  the spool  file
          numbers assigned to these files by the system.
 
             If the output had been routed to the hands-on (HOT)  printer at the
          UKCC, a message would have been sent when the job started printing:
 
               hh:mm:ss TEST  V0130 ON HANDS-ON PRINTER  134 LINES   50 CARDS
 
          Note that  the punched  output would  have gone  back to  your reader,
          since there is no HOT punch.
 
             The spool  files in your  reader can be  listed with the  QUERY RDR
          command:
 
          query rdr all
          ORIGINID FILE CLASS RECDS CPY DATE  TIME     NAME   TYPE    DIST
          OS370    1029 A PRT 00134  01 10/19 11:23:30 TEST   V0130   V0130
          OS370    1030 A PUN 00050  01 10/19 11:23:30 TEST   V0130   V0130
 
          Each file has associated with it the job name and runid.   The ACCEPT,
          OUTPUT,  PEEK,  RBROWSE and RXEDIT commands can now be used to process
          the reader  files.   It  is not  necessary to  remain logged  on after
          submitting a  job to the  batch system.    Output routed back  to your
          userid will  be available for  about a week,  and  you may log  on and
          examine it anytime within that period.
 
 
          8.B Job Status Messages
 
             As a job moves through the stages of batch processing, messages are
          sent to the submitting user.   If a  read is outstanding at a terminal
          (if  the  system  has  prompted  you for  input,   but  you  have  not
          responded), these messages will be held and not displayed until RETURN
          is  pressed.   Users  of ASCII  terminals may  want to  use the  SLEEP
          command to  place their userid  in a  dormant state,  but  still allow
          messages to be displayed:
 
               sleep
 
          Press RETURN to "wake" your userid and  make it active again.   No CPU
          time is used by your userid while it is sleeping.
 
             Use the STATUS command to get  information about a job submitted to
          the batch system.   STATUS may be  issued with either a particular job
          identifier (job name, job number, or runid) or with "ALL",  which will
          check all of the jobs submitted from your userid.
 
             The messages sent by the batch system will contain:
 
             · The job name of the selected job.
 
                                                Section 8:  OS Batch Jobs     62
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
             · The job step and procedure step names if the job is executing.
 
             · The queue the job is currently in (one of the following):
 
                    XEQn      Waiting for execution in class "n"
                    PRT       Waiting to print
                    PUN       Waiting to punch
                    <blank>   Between processing steps
 
             · The runid of the selected job.
 
             · The position in  the queue for class  A,  X,  or Z  jobs awaiting
               execution, and all print and punch jobs.  BUSY indicates that the
               job is active.
 
             · The cumulative CPU time for  jobs currently executing.   This may
               be blank if a job is between job steps.
 
             · The estimated line count for jobs awaiting execution,  the actual
               generated line count for jobs that are executing,  and the number
               of lines yet to be printed for jobs that are printing.
 
 
          8.C Canceling a Job
 
             The CANCEL command can be used to cancel a submitted job.   The job
          number of the job to be canceled  must be specified.   The job will be
          canceled at  whatever stage of  processing it  is in,  and  any output
          generated will be sent to the  specified destination.   The job number
          is the last three digits of the  runid;  e.g.,  to cancel the job with
          runid "V0130", use "130" for the job number.   The CANCEL command will
          only cancel the  current job activity.   For example,   a job canceled
          while executing or waiting to execute  will still produce some printed
          output.  This output may be canceled by repeating the CANCEL command.
 
 
          8.D Examining Your Results
 
             When the  reader spool file  containing the  output of your  job is
          available,  it may be processed in  several ways.   It may be examined
          directly with PEEK, RBROWSE (for 3270-type terminals), and RXEDIT.
 
             After examining  your output,   you may want  to produce  a printed
          copy.   The OUTPUT command  is used to print a reader  spool file at a
          HASP or RSCS printer.  For example:
 
 
                                                Section 8:  OS Batch Jobs     63
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
               output test ( route hot
 
          would print the output on the UKCC HOT printer.   You will get another
          message when the system receives the file for printing:
 
               hh:mm:ss TEST  V0130 ON VIRTUAL WRITER
 
          The system  will attempt to  use the same runid,   but if that  is not
          possible a new runid will be assigned and the message:
 
            hh:mm:ss JOB WITH RUNID V0130 HAS BEEN CHANGED TO RUNID V0256
 
          will be sent.    The printed output will  be filed by the  new number.
          The OUTPUT command  also has an option for  specifying special printer
          forms.
 
             The ACCEPT  command is  used to  copy a  reader spool  file into  a
          permanent CMS disk file.   The CMS disk  file is given a filename that
          is the same as  the job name,  and a filetype that is  the same as the
          runid.  Continuing our previous example from the SUBMIT command:
 
            accept test
            File 1029 PRT A 01/06/83 11:23:30 134 Records; TEST V0130
               102 CARDS READ --      134 LINES CREATED --     50 VARDS CREATED
            R; $0.02  11:35:43
 
          and the file "TEST V0130" would be written to disk.   The reader spool
          file  is purged.    The CC  option of  the ACCEPT  command causes  the
          original carriage control information to be retained:
 
            accept test ( cc
 
          This information is used by the PRINT command.
 
             Once copied  into a CMS  disk file,  the output  from a job  can be
          handled just like any other CMS disk file.
 
 
          8.E Claiming Your Output
 
             When output is printed in the UKCC Computer Room as a result of the
          CENTRAL option of the SUBMIT, SETPRT,  or OUTPUT commands,  it will be
          filed by  the runid assigned by  the system.   Status messages  to the
          user contain  this runid.   Should  you forget  the runid,  it  may be
          obtained by issuing the command:
 
               runid
 
 
                                                Section 8:  OS Batch Jobs     64
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          The  runid,  job  name,  and  time read  by  the system  for each  job
          submitted from the userid issuing the command will be displayed at the
          terminal.   This information is retained by the system for at least 24
          hours or through a weekend.
 
             When the RUNID command is issued, the job data is also written into
          a CMS disk  file named "RUNID FILE  A1".   This file may  be examined,
          erased, or modified by the user as desired (although it should be left
          in variable-length  format).   The  RUNID FILE  is under  the complete
          control of the user and may be kept as long as needed.
 
             Once the RUNID  command has displayed information about  a job,  it
          will not be displayed again unless the ALL parameter is specified:
 
               runid all
 
          Any jobs being displayed for the first  time will also be added to the
          RUNID FILE.
 
 
          8.F Jobs From Card Readers
 
             Printed and punched output from jobs submitted through card readers
          can be  routed to CJS  users with  using /*ROUTE cards.    This allows
          files which are already on batch-oriented media (such as cards)  to be
          transferred to CMS.    The /*ROUTE cards are placed in  the deck right
          after the job card and are in the following format:
 
               /*ROUTE  PRINT UKCC/userid  UKCC/userid
               /*ROUTE  PUNCH UKCC/userid  UKCC/userid
 
          The following restrictions apply:
 
           1.  Jobs submitted  through CJS  with the  SUBMIT command  cannot use
               ROUTE cards.  If any are present they will be ignored.
 
           2.  If a job  has punched or plotted output at  the Computing Center,
               then it must also have printed output routed there.
 
           3.  All jobs  turned in  at the  Data Center  must have  their output
               printed at the Computing Center (CENTRAL).
 
           4.  Hands-on jobs are not allowed punched output.   If a job is to be
               read on  the HOT  reader,  it must  be a  pick-up job  to produce
               punched output.
 
           5.  The normal limits on printed and punched output apply.
 
 
                                                Section 8:  OS Batch Jobs     65
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
             The following JCL  could be used to send  a deck of cards  to a CJS
          user from the HOT reader:
 
               <orange pick-up card>
               //TRANSMIT JOB 0000-00000,'A. USER'
               /*PASSWORD     password
               /*ROUTE  PRINT HOT
               /*ROUTE  PUNCH UKCC/userid  UKCC/userid
               //STEP1  EXEC PUNCH
               //SYSUT1 DD  DATA
               <data to be sent to CJS user "userid">
               /*
 
          Note that the data  must not contain any cards beginning  with "/*" in
          columns one and two.
 
 
          8.G Sending Messages to Other Users
 
             Messages can be sent from OS batch jobs to any logged on VM/SP user
          with the MESSAGE utility program.  Use the following JCL:
 
            //stepname  EXEC  MESSAGE,USERID=userid,TEXT='message-text'
 
              or
 
            //stepname  EXEC  PGM=MESSAGE,PARM='userid,message-text'
 
          The  message is  limited to  91 characters  and  will be  sent in  the
          following format:
 
            hh:mm:ss
 
            MSG FROM OS370: jobname stepname procstep message-text
 
          MESSAGE can be used  to inform several users that a  job has executed;
          or, in conjunction with the COND parameter of the EXEC card, it can be
          used to send a message only if a job ABENDs.  For example:
 
            //ENZ  JOB ...
            /*PASSWORD     password
            //S1 EXEC SOMEPROC
            //S2 EXEC MESSAGE,USERID=XYZ001,TEXT='MYPROC FAILED',COND=ONLY
 
          will send the message "MYPROC FAILED"  only if the program executed in
          step S1 terminates abnormally (ABENDs).
 
 
 
                                                Section 8:  OS Batch Jobs     66
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          8.H Checking OS JCL Under CMS
 
             The CMS command SCAN can be used to check the syntax of OS JCL in a
          job before it is submitted.   For example,  to check the syntax of the
          JCL in  a file named  "SAMPLE JOB",   the following commands  would be
          issued:
 
               osdisk
               scan sample ( type
 
          The OSDISK command is  issued first to access the OS  disks.   This is
          necessary because SCAN  will use the OS procedure  libraries which are
          located on OS disk volumes.   OSDISK need only be executed once during
          a terminal session.    The SCAN command must be given  the filename of
          the file containing the job to be  scanned.   A filetype of JOB or JCL
          is assumed.    The TYPE option  causes the  scanned JCL and  any error
          messages to be  typed at the terminal.   The  error messages generated
          are the same as  those generated by the batch system  and are found in
          the IBM System/360 OS:  Messages and  Codes manual.   SCAN will accept
          all OS  JCL and is  compatible with  the CMS SUBMIT  INCLUDE facility.
          Consult  the  UKCC CJS  Reference  for  more information  about  SCAN,
          including the steps required to access user PROCLIBs.
 
             SCAN checks  only the  syntax of JCL  statements.   There  are many
          other  JCL-related errors  that will  not  be caught,   and there  are
          several minor differences  between the results obtained  from SCAN and
          those obtained from the OS batch system:
 
             · The CLASS parameter on the JOB card will not be accepted as valid
               if it contains X or Z.
 
             · The  DLM parameter  on the  DD card  must be  enclosed in  single
               quotes if it contains special characters.
 
             · The  UKCC project  number  on the  job card  is  not checked  for
               validity.
 
             · Specifying a nonexistent program in the PGM parameter of the EXEC
               card will not be detected.
 
             · Specifying a nonexistent data set or volume will not be detected.
 
             · Specifying  a  nonexistent  or  inconsistent  unit  in  the  UNIT
               parameter of the DD card will not be detected.
 
 
 
 
                                                Section 8:  OS Batch Jobs     67
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          8.I Using OS Data Sets from CMS
 
             If you run OS batch jobs, you may keep programs and data in OS disk
          data sets.   Access to these OS data sets is available from CMS,  with
          the following restrictions:
 
             · The OS data set must reside on an online, rental disk volume.
 
             · OS data  sets are  available on a  read-only basis.    You cannot
               modify or erase an OS data set directly from CMS.
 
             · Only sequential  and partitioned  OS data sets  can be  used from
               CMS.  BDAM and ISAM data sets cannot be read.
 
             · Password protected data sets cannot be accessed by CMS.
 
             · Keys in data sets are ignored; only the data is read.
 
             · The data must  be copied to a CMS  file before it can  be used by
               most CMS commands.  This means that enough minidisk space must be
               available to contain the entire file if it is sequential,  or the
               desired members if it is partitioned.
 
             Before an OS data  set can be used,  the OS  rental volumes must be
          accessed with the OSDISK command.   The first OS volume is accessed as
          filemode H, and the remaining volumes use I, J, K, and so on.  Because
          the number of OS rental volumes changes,  and because the addresses of
          the volumes may  also change,  you should always use  OSDISK to access
          them instead of the ACCESS command.   The OSDISK command is updated to
          reflect any  changes in  the OS  rental volumes.    It should  only be
          necessary to issue the OSDISK command  once during a terminal session.
          The  CMS command  QUERY  DISK can  be used  to  display the  currently
          accessed disks and their access mode letters.
 
             You can list the data set names and other information describing OS
          disk data  sets with the LISTDS  command.   LISTDS is similar  in many
          ways to the LISTX command that performs similar functions for CMS disk
          files.   For example, to display the data set names and formats of all
          OS disk  data sets  beginning with  UKU.@XYZ01,  you  could enter  the
          commands:
 
               osdisk
               listds uku."@xyz01* * ( format
 
          The information displayed will be similar to that obtained from the OS
          MAPRENT or LITLMAP  utilities.   The PDS option of  the LISTDS command
          will list all of the members of a PDS (partitioned data set):
 
               listds uku."@xyz01.copylib * ( pds
 
             To copy an OS disk data set into  a CMS disk file,  use the FILEDEF
          and MOVEFILE  commands.   For example,  to  copy an OS data  set named
 
 
                                                Section 8:  OS Batch Jobs     68
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          UKU.@XYZ01.TESTDATA to a CMS disk file named TEST DATA on your A-disk,
          you could use the following sequence of commands:
 
               osdisk
               filedef input * dsn uku."@xyz01.testdata
               filedef output disk test data a1
               movefile input output
 
          FILEDEF assigns a name to the  defined file,  and the MOVEFILE command
          can reference this name to copy the data.  This example illustrates an
          important point  to remember when using  OS data set names  under CMS.
          The @   character that frequently  appears in OS  data set names  is a
          default VM/SP line editing character,  so it  must be preceded by a ",
          the logical escape character.
 
             The MEMBER option of  the FILEDEF command can be used  to specify a
          single member of a PDS to be copied.  For example:
 
               filedef input * dsn uku."@xyz01.library ( member number
               filedef output disk number member a
               movefile input output
 
          would copy the single member named "NUMBER" from the PDS.   It is also
          possible to copy an entire PDS and create a separate CMS disk file for
          each member.  For example:
 
               filedef input * dsn uku."@xyz01.copylib
               filedef output disk dummy copy a
               movefile input output ( pds
 
          would copy  each member from the  OS data set UKU.@XYZ01.COPYLIB  to a
          CMS disk file named "filename COPY A1", where "filename" is the member
          name from the PDS.
 
             The options  of the FILEDEF command  are similar to the  options of
          the OS DD statement.   For more information, use the HELP command,  or
          refer to the IBM VM/SP CMS Command and Macro Reference,  the IBM VM/SP
          CMS User's Guide, and the UKCC CJS Reference.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                Section 8:  OS Batch Jobs     69
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          Section 9:  Writing EXECs
 
 
             An EXEC is a file with a filename  of your choice and a filetype of
          EXEC.   The file contains a series  of commands that are executed when
          you enter the filename.   EXECs are time-savers because they allow you
          to  execute frequently-used  command  sequences  by issuing  just  one
          command.    An  EXEC  can  also  display  a  message  asking  you  for
          information that  the system needs to  finish a task you've  given it.
          EXECs may contain CMS commands and special EXEC 2 statements.
 
             For example,  let's say  that you want an EXEC that  will print six
          copies of a file.  First you would create the EXEC by entering:
 
               xedit copies exec
 
          Then  you would  enter  the INPUT  command and  type  the lines  below
          (substitute the filename and filetype of  one of your files for MYFILE
          SCRIPT in the PRINT command):
 
               &TRACE OFF
               SETPRT COPIES 6
               PRINT MYFILE SCRIPT
               SETPRT
 
          Then press the ENTER key twice to return to XEDIT mode.
 
             The first line  (&TRACE OFF)  is an EXEC 2  statement that prevents
          the lines in the EXEC from being  displayed as they are executed.   If
          you wanted the lines displayed, you would use &TRACE ALL.
 
             SETPRT COPIES  6 specifies  that six  copies of  a file  are to  be
          printed.
 
             The PRINT  MYFILE SCRIPT command  has the  same format as  when you
          enter it at a terminal.   This command gives the filename and filetype
          of the file to be printed.
 
             The SETPRT  command resets the  number of  copies to be  printed to
          one.
 
             After typing these lines you would  enter the FILE command to place
          the EXEC  on your disk.    To use your  new EXEC,  enter  the filename
          COPIES as you would  a command,  and press the ENTER  key.   A message
          will indicate that your file is being printed.
 
             You can see that  creating an EXEC is like creating  a new command.
          Each time  you want  to print six  copies of  the file,   simply enter
          COPIES.   But  suppose you want  to print  four copies of  a different
 
 
                                                Section 9:  Writing EXECs     70
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          file; does this mean you have to write another EXEC?   No, because you
          can make  a few changes to  your COPIES EXEC  and use it to  print any
          number of copies  of any file.   Simply enter "XEDIT  COPIES EXEC" and
          change the lines as shown below:
 
               &TRACE OFF
               SETPRT COPIES &1
               PRINT &2 &3
               SETPRT
 
          Enter the FILE  command to keep this  new version of your  EXEC.   The
          number of copies is now &1,  the  filename is &2,  and the filetype is
          &3.   Numbers preceded by an ampersand  (&)  signal the EXEC processor
          that they will be replaced by  values you specify.   (These are called
          parameters or arguments.)  This means that when you enter COPIES,  you
          will also supply real values to replace the &1, &2, and &3.  The first
          value must be  the number of copies  to be printed,  the  second value
          must be the filename, and the third value must be the filetype.
 
             For example, to print four copies of your file, you would enter:
 
               copies 4 myfile script
 
          The EXEC  processor takes the values  you specify and assigns  them to
          &1, &2, and &3, in that order.  SETPRT COPIES &1 becomes SETPRT COPIES
          4,  and PRINT &2 &3 becomes PRINT  MYFILE SCRIPT.   You can indicate a
          different number and  a different filename and filetype  each time you
          enter COPIES.   Remember, you must specify these values in the correct
          order; otherwise, your EXEC won't work.
 
             You can create a special EXEC,   called the PROFILE,  which will be
          executed automatically when CMS begins operation (when you log on).  A
          system PROFILE will be executed first.   The system PROFILE will issue
          the  SETPRT command  to direct  printed  output from  your userid  for
          printing at  the UKCC  Computer Room  (route CENTRAL).    Control then
          passes to  your PROFILE EXEC.    This EXEC can  be used to  tailor the
          CMS/CJS environment to your needs.
 
             For example, if you frequently use an ASCII terminal,  you may want
          to use the backspace character as the logical character delete symbol.
          It is always a good practice to change  the EMSG setting to ON so that
          error message codes will be displayed  with the message text.   All of
          this can be done in a PROFILE EXEC.   Create a file named PROFILE EXEC
          with XEDIT and place the following items in it:
 
               &TRACE OFF
               CP SET EMSG ON
               CP TERMINAL CHARDEL <backspace>
               SETCON TO *
 
          The first line (&TRACE OFF)  is an  EXEC 2 statement that prevents the
          lines in the EXEC from being displayed as they are executed.
 
 
                                                Section 9:  Writing EXECs     71
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
             The next  two lines are  CP commands and  must be prefixed  with CP
          when in an EXEC.   The backspace  character can be entered directly on
          an ASCII  terminal,  or created with  the XEDIT ALTER  subcommand,  or
          entered  in  hexadecimal  mode  (the  backspace  character  is  16  in
          hexadecimal).   The SETCON command will  begin console spooling.   The
          LOGOFF command will test  for this and ask whether or  not the spooled
          console log should  be retained.   This spooled console  record can be
          very valuable when  you are trying to diagnose an  error that occurred
          on a display-type terminal.
 
             If  you  use  a  PROFILE   EXEC  that  performs  terminal-dependent
          functions (like  setting the LINESIZE),  you  will want to  execute it
          when you are reconnecting after a disconnect.  This is accomplished by
          entering the "PROFILE" command.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                Section 9:  Writing EXECs     72
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          Section 10:  Other Features of CJS
 
 
             This  section  describes   some  other  features  of   CJS.    More
          information about these  and other topics can be found  in the manuals
          listed in the Preface.
 
 
          10.A Suggestions
 
             If you have suggestions,  questions,  or complaints about Computing
          Center services,   policies,  or procedures,  you  can let us  know by
          sending a note to the online suggestion box.   Suggestions need not be
          signed,  but they cannot be completely  anonymous since your userid is
          attached to the note by the system.    To send your comments,  use the
          NOTE command to send a note to userid UCC101:
 
               note ucc101
 
          The NOTE  command is  explained in the  "Communicating with  Other CJS
          Users" section elsewhere in this manual.
 
             Suggestions can  also be  deposited in  the Suggestion  Box on  the
          first floor of McVey Hall, or mailed to:
 
               Newsletter Editor
               UK Computing Center
               72 McVey Hall
               Lexington, KY  40506-0045
 
          Most suggestions are not answered directly,   but are published in The
          Kentucky Register, the Computing Center's monthly newsletter.
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                       Section 10:  Other Features of CJS     73
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          10.B Online Kentucky Register
 
             The text of the Computing Center's monthly newsletter, The Kentucky
          Register,  is  available under  CJS to  be viewed  or printed  at your
          terminal.  Enter the command:
 
               kyreg
 
          and  the latest  issue  will be  displayed  using  either BROWSE  (for
          3270-type terminals) or XEDIT (for other kinds of terminals).  You may
          then use  ordinary BROWSE or XEDIT  subcommands to scroll  through the
          text or search for specific items.
 
             You can  print a  copy of the  Register on  a printing  terminal by
          entering the command:
 
               kyreg print
 
 
          10.C Plotting
 
             A  number  of commands  are  available  for users  needing  plotted
          output.   The Computing Center provides  a high-speed Zeta pen plotter
          (available in a batch mode)  and  a VT100 graphics terminal (available
          in the Micro  Lab in 107 McVey Hall).   Packages  like SAS/GRAPH,  and
          user-written programs can  be used to produce  graphic output.   These
          programs are run  as ordinary OS batch jobs and  produce special files
          containing instructions for  a plotting device.   The  PLOT command is
          used to send such files to the Zeta plotter at the UKCC.   The PLOTTEK
          command uses  a plot  file to  produce output  on the  VT100 or  other
          Tektronix-compatible graphics terminals.   Commands are also available
          to produce output on Hewlett  Packard graphics terminals (PLOTHP)  and
          Anderson Jacobson printing terminals (PLOTAJ).
 
             The  plotting commands  are described  in  detail in  the UKCC  CJS
          Reference and  by the HELP  command.   More information  about writing
          your own plotting programs can be found in the UKCC Plotting Manual.
 
 
 
 
 
                                       Section 10:  Other Features of CJS     74
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          10.D Backing Up Your Files
 
             If you have CMS disk files that are particularly important or would
          be difficult to recreate, you may want to maintain additional machine-
          readable copies as backup.    One way to do this would  be to copy the
          files periodically to  tape with an OS batch job.    For example,  the
          following JCL could be used to copy two files to a tape:
 
            //BACKUP   JOB account,'A. USER'
            /*SETUP     TAPE=(volume,RINGIN)
            /*PASSWORD     password
            //STEP1    EXEC PGM=IEBGENER
            //SYSPRINT DD  SYSOUT=A
            //SYSIN    DD  DUMMY
            //SYSUT1   DD  DATA
            ..INCLUDE first file ( IGNORE
            /*
            //SYSUT2   DD  DSN=first.file,LABEL=1,VOL=SER=volume,UNIT=TAPE,
            //             DCB=(RECFM=FB,LRECL=80,BLKSIZE=8000),DISP=(NEW,PASS)
            //STEP2    EXEC PGM=IEBGENER
            //SYSPRINT DD  SYSOUT=A
            //SYSIN    DD  DUMMY
            //SYSUT1   DD  DATA
            ..INCLUDE second file ( IGNORE
            /*
            //SYSUT2   DD  DSN=second.file,LABEL=2,VOL=SER=volume,UNIT=TAPE,
            //             DCB=(RECFM=FB,LRECL=80,BLKSIZE=8000),DISP=(NEW,PASS)
 
          The IGNORE option  specified on the INCLUDE statements  will cause any
          imbedded INCLUDE statements to be ignored.  This will prevent any file
          but the one specified from being transmitted with the job.
 
             To recover files that have been saved  in this manner,  a batch job
          must be used to read from the tape  and punch the data to your userid.
          The following  JCL could be  used to retrieve  the second file  from a
          tape:
 
            //RECOVER  JOB account,'A. USER'
            /*SETUP     TAPE=volume
            /*PASSWORD     password
            //STEP1    EXEC PGM=IEBGENER
            //SYSPRINT DD  SYSOUT=A
            //SYSIN    DD  DUMMY
            //SYSUT1   DD  DSN=second.file,LABEL=2,VOL=SER=volume,UNIT=TAPE,
            //             DISP=OLD
            //SYSUT2   DD  SYSOUT=B,DCB=(RECFM=F,LRECL=80)
 
          The punched output from this job should  be routed back to your userid
          through use of the TERMINAL option of the SUBMIT command.   The ACCEPT
          command will  then be used  to read the output  into a CMS  disk file.
          The CMS disk file created in  this manner will contain variable-length
          records unless you specify the RECFM F option of the ACCEPT command.
 
 
                                       Section 10:  Other Features of CJS     75
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
             This method has a number of limitations.  You must buy a tape to be
          kept at the Computing Center and you  must somehow keep track of where
          each CMS file is  on the tape (the batch utility  program TAPEMAP will
          be of some help;   the TAPEMAP manual is available online  with use of
          the MANUAL command).    The files must not contain  any records longer
          than 80 characters (usually not a problem),  and the number of records
          in each file should be limited because only 2,000 punch records may be
          returned to your terminal  from any one batch job.   Using  the JCL in
          the example above,   the files must not contain  any records beginning
          with /* in column one.   This would include HASP /*PASSWORD,  /*SETUP,
          and /*MESSAGE control statements that may appear in OS batch jobs.
 
 
          10.E The PUBLIC Disk
 
             The PUBLIC  disk is  a minidisk  containing EXECs  and other  files
          contributed by  Computing Center users.    To access the  PUBLIC disk,
          simply issue the command "PUBLIC",  or place the command "EXEC PUBLIC"
          in your PROFILE EXEC.   HELP is available  for each item on the PUBLIC
          disk, and "HELP PUBLIC MENU" will give you a list of what is currently
          available.
 
             The Computing Center does not provide support or consulting for the
          items on the PUBLIC disk.   They have not been tested by the Computing
          Center, and you use them at your own risk.  If you have a complaint or
          suggestion about an item,  contact the person who submitted it.   (The
          HELP information  for an item will  identify the submitter.)    If you
          would  like to  contribute  an item  to the  PUBLIC  disk,  contact  a
          Computing Center consultant.
 
 
          10.F Punching a Real Card Deck
 
             Should you ever need a deck of  cards punched from a CMS file,  you
          must submit an  OS batch job.   The  output of the job  must be routed
          either  to CENTRAL  (the  UKCC Computer  Room)  or  to  a remote  site
          equipped with a card punch.
 
             For example,  the following job submitted through CJS would produce
          a punched deck of cards:
 
                //PUNCH   JOB  0000-00000,'A. USER'
                /*PASSWORD     password
                //STEP1   EXEC  PUNCH
                //SYSUT1  DD  DATA
                ..INCLUDE fn ft fm
 
                                       Section 10:  Other Features of CJS     76
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
                /*
 
          The contents of the file "fn ft fm" would be punched.   (The file must
          not contain any records with /* in columns one and two.)   If this job
          was in a file named "PUNCH JOB", the following command would submit it
          for punching at the UK Computing Center:
 
               submit punch(central
 
          Remember that the job's  runid is required to claim the  output from a
          batch job routed to CENTRAL.
 
 
          10.G Reading a Real Card Deck
 
             An OS batch job is required to  read a deck of punched cards.   The
          batch job must  read and punch the  data,  routing the output  to your
          userid.  Refer to the section in this manual on OS batch jobs for more
          information.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                       Section 10:  Other Features of CJS     77
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          APPENDIX A:   The Terminal Environments
 
 
          +--------------------------------------------------------------------+
          |                                                                    |
          | CP Mode       To return to CMS, enter BEGIN.                       |
          |                                                                    |
          | +-------------------------------------------------------------+    |
          | |                                                             |    |
          | | CMS                                                         |    |
          | | You enter CMS automatically when you log on.  To go to CP,  |    |
          | | press BREAK twice on an ASCII terminal, PA1 once on a 3270. |    |
          | |                                                             |    |
          | | +-----------------------------+                             |    |
          | | |                             |                             |    |
          | | | XEDIT                       |                             |    |
          | | | Use FILE, QUIT, or CANCEL   |                             |    |
          | | | to return to CMS; press PA1 |                             |    |
          | | | to go to CP mode; enter CMS |                             |    |
          | | | to go to CMS Subset; enter  |                             |    |
          | | | INPUT, REPLACE, or POW to   |                             |    |
          | | | go to Input mode.           |                             |    |
          | | |                             |                             |    |
          | | |                             |                             |    |
          | | | +-------------------+       |                             |    |
          | | | |                   |       |                             |    |
          | | | | INPUT MODE        |       |                             |    |
          | | | | Press ENTER twice |       |                             |    |
          | | | | to return to      |       |                             |    |
          | | | | XEDIT.            |       |                             |    |
          | | | +-------------------+       |                             |    |
          | | |                             |                             |    |
          | | | +-------------------+       |                             |    |
          | | | |                   |       |                             |    |
          | | | | CMS SUBSET        |       |                             |    |
          | | | | Enter RETURN to   |       |                             |    |
          | | | | return to XEDIT.  |       |                             |    |
          | | | +-------------------+       |                             |    |
          | | |                             |                             |    |
          | | | +-------------------+       |                             |    |
          | | | |                   |       |                             |    |
          | | | | All CP and CMS    |       |                             |    |
          | | | | commands can be   |       |                             |    |
          | | | | used from XEDIT.  |       |                             |    |
          | | | +-------------------+       |                             |    |
          | | +-----------------------------+                             |    |
          | +-------------------------------------------------------------+    |
          +--------------------------------------------------------------------+
 
 
                                   Appendix A:  The Terminal Environments     78
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          APPENDIX B:   A Sample Terminal Session
 
 
             The following  is a sample terminal  session on an  ASCII terminal.
          It demonstrates creating a job, submitting the job for execution,  and
          receiving and  examining the output  at the  terminal.   A few  of the
          longer lines have been reformatted to fit on the page.   Lines entered
          by the  user are shown in  lowercase characters,  system  responses in
          uppercase.   The "." preceding the input  lines is the prompt from the
          system and is not typed by the user.  Lines beginning with "--->|" are
          inserted comments  and should not be  considered part of  the terminal
          session.   Lines marked "[null line]" indicate that RETURN was pressed
          without typing any other characters.
 
                    --->|  After connecting to the system (by telephone,
                    --->|  etc.), the service must be requested.
          rs
          REQUEST:
          cjs
                    --->|  The system should respond with:
 
          VM/370 ONLINE
                    --->|  Press the Attention key (labeled BREAK, ATTN, etc.).
 
          !
                    --->|  VM/SP will respond with "!" and a prompt.
                    --->|  Begin the terminal session by logging on.
          .logon usr001
          ENTER PASSWORD:
          .********
                    --->|  After the  password is  entered,  CMS/CJS  is started
                    --->|  automatically.    The time  and  version  of CMS  are
                    --->|  displayed.   The message beginning "FILES:" indicates
                    --->|  that a spool  file is in the reader.    This might be
                    --->|  output from a batch job.
          LOGON AT 07:55:24 EST FRIDAY 01/06/83
          FILES: 001 RDR,  NO PRT,  NO PUN
          CMS/CJS SP201    PRESS ENTER OR RETURN
          .[null line]
          Y (19E) R/O
          R; $0.01  07:55:34
                    --->|  The program to be written is entered by editing a CMS
                    --->|  file.  In this example the CMS file has a filename of
                    --->|  "AREA",  a filetype of "JOB",  and a default filemode
                    --->|  of "A1".
          .xedit area job
                    --->|  The  next line  indicates  that the  CMS  file to  be
                    --->|  edited did not previously exist,   but that XEDIT has
                    --->|  created the  necessary file and  is ready  to perform
                    --->|  any edit functions desired.
 
                                   Appendix B:  A Sample Terminal Session     79
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          NEW FILE:
                    --->|  To enter data into the CMS  file,  get into the INPUT
                    --->|  mode of the editor.
          .input
          INPUT MODE:
                    --->|  The following lines are entered.  Note the use of the
                    --->|  character delete symbol (@) in the 7th line.
          .//area job 9999-99999,'a. user',class=x
          ./*password    password
          .//step1 exec watfiv
          .//go.sysin dd *
          .$job
          .      pi=atan(1.)*4.
          .    1 read, rsadius
          .      print, 're@adius',rsadius
          .      area=pi*r**2
          .      print,'area',area
          .      return
          .      end
          .$entry
          .1.0
          .$stop
          ./*
                    --->|  Exit from input mode by pressing RETURN twice.
          .[null line]
          .[null line]
          XEDIT:
                    --->|  After looking  over the  lines entered,   notice that
                    --->|  instead of  "RADIUS",  "RSADIUS" has been  entered in
                    --->|  two places.   To correct these,   first return to the
                    --->|  top  of  the file  and  then  issue a  global  CHANGE
                    --->|  command  to  change  all occurrences  of  the  error.
                    --->|  XEDIT responds with the corrected lines.
          .top
          TOF:
          .change /rsadius/radius/ *
              1 READ, RADIUS
                PRINT, 'RADIUS',RADIUS
          EOF:
                    --->|  Next  notice  that  line  5  has  "PI*R"  instead  of
                    --->|  "PI*RADIUS".    Return to  the top  of  the file  and
                    --->|  locate the line in error.
          .top
          TOF:
          ./area=
                AREA=PI*R**2
                    --->|  Omitting the  global operands,  change  the incorrect
                    --->|  character string.
          .c/*r/*radius/
                AREA=PI*RADIUS**2
                    --->|  The entire corrected program is now examined.
          .top
          TOF:
          .type *
 
                                   Appendix B:  A Sample Terminal Session     80
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          TOF:
          //AREA JOB 9999-99999,'A. USER',CLASS=X
          //STEP1 EXEC WATFIV
          //GO.SYSIN DD *
          $JOB
                PI=ATAN(1.)*4.
              1 READ, RADIUS
                PRINT, 'RADIUS',RADIUS
                AREA=PI*RADIUS**2
                PRINT,'AREA',AREA
                RETURN
                END
          $ENTRY
          1.0
          $STOP
          /*
          EOF:
                    --->|  Since there  are no more  mistakes,  the file  is now
                    --->|  stored on the user's minidisk for future use, and the
                    --->|  editor returns to the CMS environment.
          .file
          R; $0.05  09:51:25
                    --->|  The  program is  now  sent to  the  batch system  for
                    --->|  execution by  submitting the CMS  file "AREA  JOB A1"
                    --->|  containing the program.   In this case,  filetype and
                    --->|  filemode are  omitted because "JOB"  and "A"  are the
                    --->|  defaults.    The  default  routing  is  back  to  the
                    --->|  terminal.    The SLEEP  command  is  issued to  allow
                    --->|  messages to be displayed.
          .submit area
          R; $0.02  09:51:43
          .sleep
          09:52:43 AREA     V0136  READ BY OS370
          09:52:44 AREA     V0136  IN EXECUTION
          09:52:56 AREA     V0136  COMPLETED EXECUTION
          PRT FILE 1210 FROM OS370    COPY 01 NOHOLD
                    --->|  The program  output has been  returned to  the user's
                    --->|  virtual reader.   The  output can now be  made into a
                    --->|  CMS file with  the INPUT command and  can be examined
                    --->|  using the  editor.   First press  ATTN to  "wake" the
                    --->|  sleeping terminal.
          !
          .accept area
          FILE 1210 PRT A 01/06/83 09:51:56 131 RECORDS; AREA V0136
           17 CARDS READ --       89 LINES CREATED --     NO VARDS CREATED
          R; $0.02 09:53:00
          .xedit area v0136
          ./$job/
                   $JOB
          .type *
                   $JOB
               1         PI=ATAN(1.)*4.
               2       1 READ, RADIUS
               3         PRINT, 'RADIUS',RADIUS
 
                                   Appendix B:  A Sample Terminal Session     81
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
               4         AREA=PI*RADIUS**2
               5         PRINT,'AREA',AREA
               6         RETURN
               7         END
                   $ENTRY
          RADIUS    0.1000000E 01
          AREA    0.3141592E 01
          CORE USAGE       OBJECT CODE=     408 BYTES,
          ARRAY AREA=       0 BYTES,TOTAL AREA AVAILABLE=   36864  BYTES
          DIAGNOSTICS        NUMBER OF ERRORS=       0,
          NUMBER OF WARNINGS=       0, NUMBER OF EXTENSIONS=       0
          COMPILE TIME=     0.01 SEC,EXECUTION TIME=     0.00 SEC,
          WATFIV - JUL 1973 V1L4       9.54.56    THURSDAY     06 JAN 83
                   $STOP
 
           JOB COST --     $.03 --      NO EXCPS --     128 LINES SPOOLED
           .00003 HOURS CPU TIME --    NO VARDS SPOOLED --     7 PAGES -
          YEARLY TOTAL --    $125.96 ACCT BALANCE --   $2874.04
          EOF:
                    --->|  After examining the output,  QUIT is issued to return
                    --->|  to the CMS environment, and then SETPRT and PRINT are
                    --->|  used to produce hardcopy of the output.
          .quit
          R; $0.03  09:55:27
          .setprt
          R; $0.01  09:56:06
          .print area v0136
          R; $0.02  09:56:07
          09:56:07 AREA     V0136  ON VIRTUAL WRITER
                    --->|  The SETPRT/PRINT command combination  sends the spool
                    --->|  file to be printed.   The runid (V0136) of the output
                    --->|  is sent to the user in a message.  By default, SETPRT
                    --->|  routes the printed listing to  the UKCC Computer Room
                    --->|  (CENTRAL).   If the CMS file containing the output is
                    --->|  no longer needed, it can be erased.
          .erase area v0136
          R; $0.01  09:58:18
                    --->|  To verify the runid assigned  by the system (and have
                    --->|  it recorded  in your  RUNID FILE),   issue the  RUNID
                    --->|  command.
          .runid
          JOBNAME   DATE/TIME SENT      RUNID
          AREA      01/06/83  09:56:07  V0136
          R; $0.02  10:02:23
                    --->|  To end the terminal session, use the LOG command.  If
                    --->|  any  reader spool  files  are  present they  will  be
                    --->|  listed.   You may purge some, all, or none.   If more
                    --->|  information is needed, use the "L" or "?" response.
          .log
          Reader spool files are subject to charges. You have the following:
          File Typ Filename Filetype Date   Time Lines Est.Blk Est.Chg. Cost/Day
          0543 PRT WCSGENER MANUAL 04/18/83 14:07   73       1  $0.0000  $0.0035
          Enter its spool file number or ALL to PURGE, or press ENTER to keep:
          .all
 
                                   Appendix B:  A Sample Terminal Session     82
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          0001 FILE  PURGED
          $0.20 (0.289 sec CPU, 280 I/O op's) will be charged to 1234-56789.
          Balance for project 1234-56789 is $187.42 (Allocation $200.00).
          CONNECT= 02:40:04 VIRTCPU= 000:00.29 TOTCPU= 000:01.60
          LOGOFF AT 10:14:28 EST MONDAY 04/18/83
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                   Appendix B:  A Sample Terminal Session     83
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          APPENDIX C:   3270 Program Function Key Template
 
 
          Cut out the template, fold on the center vertical line,  and fasten it
          to a computer punch card (and  you thought they were obsolete!).   Cut
          out the space in  the center of the bottom half and  place over the PF
          keys on the 3270 keyboard.   One side is marked with the default XEDIT
          key settings, the other is for your own use.
 
          +---------------------------------------------------------------+
          |  XEDIT Program Function Keys  |                               |
          |+--------++--------++--------+ | +--------++--------++--------+|
          || PF1    || PF2    || PF3    | | | PF1    || PF2    || PF3    ||
          || Help   || Add    || Quit   | | |        ||        ||        ||
          |+--------++--------++--------+ | +--------++--------++--------+|
          |+--------++--------++--------+ | +--------++--------++--------+|
          || PF4    || PF5    || PF6    | | | PF4    || PF5    || PF6    ||
          || Tab    || SCHANGE|| ?      | | |        ||        ||        ||
          |+--------++--------++--------+ | +--------++--------++--------+|
          |+--------++--------++--------+ | +--------++--------++--------+|
          || PF7    || PF8    || PF9    | | | PF7    || PF8    || PF9    ||
          || BAck   || FOrward|| =      | | |        ||        ||        ||
          |+--------++--------++--------+ | +--------++--------++--------+|
          |+--------++--------++--------+ | +--------++--------++--------+|
          || PF10   || PF11   || PF12   | | | PF10   || PF11   || PF12   ||
          || Split  || Join   || Cursor | | |        ||        ||        ||
          |+--------++--------++--------+ | +--------++--------++--------+|
          |   +----------------------+    |    +----------------------+   |
          |   |                      |    |    |                      |   |
          |   |                      |    |    |                      |   |
          |   |                      |    |    |                      |   |
          |PA2|                      |    |    |                      |   |
          | N |                      |    |    |                      |   |
          | U |                      |    |    |                      |   |
          |<L |                      |    |    |                      |   |
          | L |     Cut Out This     |    |    |     And This, Too    |   |
          | S |        Space         |    |    |                      |   |
          |   |                      |    |    |                      |   |
          |   |                      |    |    |                      |   |
          |   |                      |    |    |                      |   |
          |   |                      |    |    |                      |   |
          |   |                      |    |    |                      |   |
          |   |                      |    |    |                      |   |
          |   |                      |    |    |                      |   |
          |   |                      |    |    |                      |   |
          |   |                      |    |    |                      |   |
          |   |                      |    |    |                      |   |
          |   |                      |    |    |                      |   |
          |   |                      |    |    |                      |   |
          |   +----------------------+    |    +----------------------+   |
          +---------------------------------------------------------------+
 
                          Appendix C:  3270 Program Function Key Template     84
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
                                                                           INDEX
 
 
          -/-                                  -C-
          /, 29, 31, 34, 45                    C, 46
          /*JOBPARM, 60                        CANCEL, 48
          /*ROUTE, 65                          CANCEL command, 63
          /*SETUP, 59                          CAPPEND, 37
                                               cards, 60, 76
          -?-                                  CASE, 35
          ?, 14                                cathode ray tube, 5
                                               CC, 46
          -#-                                  CDELETE, 37
          #CP, 16                              CFIRST, 37
                                               CHANGE, 31-32, 47
          -=-                                  character codes, 6
          =, 14                                character delete, 15
                                               CHARDEL, 15
          -"-                                  charges, 4
          ", 46                                CINSERT, 37
                                               CJS, 1
          -A-                                  CLEAR key, 17
          A, 45                                CLOCATE, 36
          ACCEPT command, 2, 22, 57-58, 64     CMDLINE, 42
          ACCESS command, 21, 25               CMS, 1
          acoustic coupler, 5                  CMS disk files, 1, 20
          ADD, 30                              CMS mode, 14
          ARBCHAR, 35                          CMS Subset, 14
          argument, 71                         COLPTR, 49
          ASCII, 6                             column pointer, 36, 42, 49
          asynchronous, 6                      column subcommands, 50
          attention, 13                        column target, 36
          AUTOLINK command, 25                 complaints, 73
          AUTOSAVE, 26, 39                     CONNECT, 11
                                               console log, 12, 19
          -B-                                  console spooling, 19
          backup, 2, 75                        COPY, 30
          BACKWARD, 29                         COPYFILE command, 22
          batch, 1                             cost, 4
          baud, 8                              CP, 3
          BDAM, 68                             CP mode, 14
          BEGIN command, 12, 14                CP READ, 17
          binary synchronous, 6                CRT, 5
          bisync, 6                            CURLINE, 45
          BOTTOM, 29, 49                       current column, 42, 49
          BREAK key, 13                        current line, 28, 42, 45, 48
          BROWSE command, 22                   cylinder, 2
          BURN command, 22, 58, 60
                                               -D-
                                               D, 45
                                               data bits, 7
 
                                                                    Index     85
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          data sets, 22, 68                    -G-
          dataphone, 5                         GET, 32-33
          DD, 45                               global change, 31-32
          DEL, 47                              graphics, 74
          DEL key, 15
          DELETE, 30                           -H-
          deleting files, 22                   half-duplex, 7
          dial-up, 5                           halt execution, 18
          disconnect, 12, 72                   halt typing, 18
          disk files, 20                       HELP, 3
          disk format, 20                         XEDIT, 41
          disk full, 24                        HOLDING, 17
          disk mounts, 59                      HT, 18
          disk rental, 4                       HX, 18
          display terminal, 5
          DOWN, 29, 49                         -I-
                                               INCLUDE statement, 60-61
          -E-                                  INPUT, 27, 44, 50
          EBCDIC, 6                            INPUT INHIBITED, 17
          EDIT, 26                             input mode, 27
          edit mode, 27                        INS MODE, 15, 47
          editing session, 26                  insert mode, 15, 17
          editor, 21                           ISAM, 68
          editors, 26
          empty line, 16                       -J-
          ENTER key, 13                        JCL, 67
          ERASE command, 22, 39                job, 1
          ERASE EOF key, 15                    JOIN, 47
          ERASE INPUT key, 15
          escape, 15, 50                       -K-
          EXEC, 70                             KECNET, 7
                                               Kentucky Register, 74
          -F-                                  KYREG command, 74
          F, 46
          failure, 12                          -L-
          FILE, 26, 39                         LABELS command, 52
          FILEDEF command, 22, 69              limits, 60
          fileid, 20                           line delete, 15
          filemode, 20                         line editing, 15
          filemode letter, 21                  line end, 15
          filemode number, 21                  line pointer, 28, 48
          filename, 20                         line speed, 8
          files, 20                            LINEDEL, 15
          filetype, 20                         LINEND, 15
          FIND, 31                             lines, 60
          FINDUP, 31                           LINESIZE, 18
          FLIST command, 23                    LINK command, 25
          format, 20                           LISTDS command, 68
          forms, 51                            LISTX command, 23
          FORWARD, 29                          LITLMAP utility, 68
          full disk, 24                        local terminal, 5
                                               LOCATE, 31
                                               log message, 11
                                               logging off, 11
 
                                                                    Index     86
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          logging on, 1, 10                    passwords, 10
          LOGMSG, 11                           PA1 key, 13
          LOGOFF, 11                           PA2, 47
          LOGON, 10                            PA2 key, 17
          LRECL, 28                            PDS, 69
                                               PEEK command, 2, 57-58, 63
          -M-                                  PF, 44
          M, 46                                PF keys, 14, 38, 43
          MAPRENT utility, 68                  physical blocks, 20
          MEMBER option, 69                    plotting, 74
          memory, 3                            POINT, 34
          MESSAGE utility, 66                  port selector, 8
          messages, 53, 62                     POWER, 44
          microcomputers, 7                    power typing, 44, 47
          minidisk, 2-3, 20                    PREFIX, 42
          MM, 46                               PRINT command, 51
          modem, 5                             printing, 51
          MORE, 17                             printing terminal, 5
          MOVE, 30                             PROFILE EXEC, 12, 71
          MOVEFILE command, 22, 69             PROFILE XEDIT, 38, 40
                                               Program Function keys, 14
          -N-                                  PUBLIC command, 76
          NAMES command, 53                    PUBLIC disk, 76
          names file, 53                       public terminals, 6
          NETDATA, 55                          punching, 76
          NEWS command, 11                     PURGE RDR command, 60
          newsletter, 74                       PUT, 32
          NEXT, 29
          NFIND, 31                            -Q-
          NFINDUP, 31                          q tabs, 29
          nickname, 53                         QQUIT, 39
          node identifier, 17                  QUERY DISK command, 23, 68
          NOT ACCEPTED, 17                     QUERY PF, 44
          NOTE command, 55                     QUERY RDR command, 62
          notes, 53                            QUERY READER ALL command, 56
          null line, 16                        QUERY TABS, 29
          NULLS, 47                            QUIT, 26, 39
          NUMBER, 33, 42, 45
                                               -R-
          -O-                                  RBROWSE command, 2, 63
          operator replies, 59                 reader, 2, 56
          OS data sets, 22, 68                 reader files, 60
          OS disk data sets, 1                 ready message, 10
          OS rental volumes, 68                recall function, 14
          OUTPUT command, 2                    RECFM, 40
                                               reconnect, 12, 72
          -P-                                  RECOVER, 30, 46
          P, 46                                recovery, 12
          PACK, 24                             remote terminal, 5
          PACK command, 24, 40                 RENAME command, 22, 39
          packed files, 24                     rental volumes, 68
          parameter, 71                        REPLACE, 50
          parity, 7                            replies, 59
          partitioned data sets, 69            RESET, 46
 
                                                                    Index     87
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          RESET key, 15                        SPELL command, 37
          resume typing, 18                    SPELLCHK command, 37-38
          RETRIEVE, 14                         SPELLFIX command, 37
          RETRIEVE PF key, 14                  spelling
          RETURN command, 14                      aids, 37
          RETURN key, 13                       SPLIT, 47
          reuse function, 14                   spool file, 3
          RLIST command, 58                    spool files, 1, 10-11, 60
          RT, 18                               spooling, 19
          RUNID, 64                            stacking, 13
          RUNNING, 17                          STATUS command, 62
          RXEDIT command, 63                   stop bits, 8
                                               storage, 3
          -S-                                  string, 34
          SAS/GRAPH, 74                        SUBMIT command, 2, 60
          SAVE, 26, 39                         Subset, 14
          SCALE, 43                            suggestions, 73
          SCAN command, 67                     switched line, 5
          SCREEN, 48                           synchronous, 6
          SCRIPT, 1                            SYSTEM AVAILABLE, 17
          SCRIPT command, 52                   S3270 Facility, 6
          selective change, 47
          SENDFILE command, 25, 55             -T-
          SET ARBCHAR, 35                      tabbing, 28
          SET AUTOSAVE, 39                     TABS, 29
          SET CASE, 35                         tape, 76
          SET CMDLINE, 42                      tape mounts, 59
          SET COLPTR, 49                       tapes, 60
          SET CURLINE, 45                      target, 31, 33
          SET ESCAPE, 50                       telephone numbers, 8
          SET IMSG command, 56                 TERMINAL command, 15
          SET MSG command, 56                  TERMINAL LINESIZE, 18
          SET NULLS, 47                        text formatting, 52
          SET NUMBER, 33, 42, 45               TOP, 29, 49
          SET PACK, 24, 40                     TOTCPU, 11
          SET PF, 44                           TPRINT command, 51
          SET POINT, 34                        TRUNC, 28
          SET PREFIX, 42                       TYPE, 48
          SET RECFM, 40
          SET SCALE, 43                        -U-
          SET SCREEN, 48                       UCC101, 73
          SET SPAN, 35                         UNPACK command, 24, 40
          SET TABS, 29                         UP, 29, 49
          SET VARBLANK, 36                     userid, 1
          SET WRAP, 31
          SETCON, 19                           -V-
          SETPRT command, 51                   VARBLANK, 36
          sharing files, 25                    variable-length records, 24
          simulator, 6                         VIRTCPU, 11
          SLEEP command, 62                    virtual, 3
          SORTF command, 22                    virtual machine, 3
          SPAN, 35                             VM READ, 17
          special forms, 51                    VM/SP, 1
          speed, 8                             VT100 graphics terminal, 74
 
                                                                    Index     88
 
          CJS User's Guide
 
 
 
          -W-
          WRAP, 31
 
          -X-
          XEDIT, 21, 26-27
             screen format, 41
 
          -Z-
          Zeta plotter, 74
 
          -3-
          3270 simulator, 6
          3270-type terminal, 6
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                                    Index     89